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Gulf War Syndrome clinical trials at UC Health
5 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

  • Alleviating Headache and Pain in GWI With Neuronavigation Guided rTMS

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study aims to assess the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on Gulf War illness related headaches and pain.

    at UCSD

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia for Gulf War Illness

    open to all eligible people

    Sleep disturbance is a common complaint of Veterans with Gulf War Illness (GWI). Because there is clinical evidence that sleep quality influences pain, fatigue, mood, cognition, and daily functioning, this study will investigate whether a type of behavioral sleep treatment called Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBTi) can help Gulf War Veterans with GWI. CBTi is a multicomponent treatment where patients learn about sleep and factors affecting sleep as well as how to alter habits that may impair or even prevent sleep. The investigators hypothesize that helping Gulf War Veterans learn how to achieve better sleep with CBTi may also help to alleviate their other non-sleep symptoms of GWI.

    at UCSF

  • Mitochondrial Cocktail for Gulf War Illness

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to develop preliminary evidence, such as effect size and variance estimates, to guide successful conduct of a properly-powered clinical trial to assess the benefit of a mitochondrial cocktail plus individualized correction of citric acid cycle (CAC) intermediates and amino acid (AA) abnormalities as part of a mitochondrial/oxidative stress treatment approach in Gulf War Illness (GWI).

    at UCSD

  • rTMS in Alleviating Pain and Co-Morbid Symptoms in Gulf War Veterans Illness (GWVI)

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study aims to look at the effectiveness of using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in relieving pain and other co-morbid symptoms of Gulf War Illness.

    at UCSD

  • Scalp Application of Red and Near-Infrared Light, From Light-Emitting Diodes (LED) to Improve Thinking and Memory in Veterans With Gulf War Illnesses

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to learn if an experimental treatment can help thinking ability, and memory in Veterans with Gulf War Veterans Illnesses (GWVI). The experimental treatment uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs), that are applied outside the skull, to the head using a helmet that is lined with near-infrared diodes. LEDs are also placed in the nostrils (one red diode: and one near-infrared diode), to possibly deliver photons to the deeper parts of the brain. A treatment takes about 30 minutes. The participants receive a series of LED treatments which take place as outpatient visits at the VA Boston Healthcare System, Jamaica Plain Campus. The LEDs contain red and near-infrared diodes. The FDA considers the LED device used here, to be a non-significant risk device. The LEDs do not produce heat.

    at UCSF

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