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HIV-Associated Dementia clinical trials at University of California Health

17 in progress, 9 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Imiquimod, Fluorouracil, or Observation in Treating HIV-Positive Patients With High-Grade Anal Squamous Skin Lesions

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies imiquimod or fluorouracil to see how well they work compared to observation in treating patients with high-grade anal squamous skin lesions who are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive. Biological therapies, such as imiquimod, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known whether imiquimod or fluorouracil is more effective than observation in treating high-grade anal squamous skin lesions.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • More Options for Children and Adolescents (MOCHA): Oral and Long-Acting Injectable Cabotegravir and Rilpivirine in HIV-Infected Children and Adolescents

    open to eligible people ages 12-17

    The purpose of this study is to determine the dosage for oral and IM Cabotegravir LA and IM Rilpiverine LA and evaluate the safety, acceptability, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of oral and long-acting injectable cabotegravir and long-acting injectable rilpivirine in virologically suppressed HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Pharmacokinetics Distribution of Raltegravir by PET/MR

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a single-center drug distribution and pharmacokinetic study of a single microdose of 18F-raltegravir given to 10 HIV-infected subjects who are either taking or not taking a raltegravir-containing ART regimen. After administration of IV 18F-raltegravir, subjects will undergo PET/MRI in order to determine the distribution of radiolabeled drug through the lymphoreticular system and other tissues throughout the entire body.

    at UCSF

  • Phase II Trial of Tesamorelin for Cognition in Aging HIV-Infected Persons

    open to eligible people ages 40 years and up

    The aim of this study is to test whether tesamorelin, in combination with a text-messaging application to help with motivation and adherence, will significantly improve memory and thinking in HIV.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Rural Dementia Caregiver Project

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    These caregivers are a vulnerable group due to their physical isolation and well-documented rural disparities in health care access and quality. Many rural dementia caregivers experience serious health consequences due to caregiving responsibilities that can limit their ability to maintain their caregiving role. Thus, there is a pressing need for effective, scalable, and accessible programs to support rural dementia caregivers. Online programs offer a convenient and readily translatable option for program delivery because they can be accessed by caregivers in the home and at the convenience of the user. Building Better Caregivers is an online 6-week, interactive, small-group self-management, social support, and skills-building workshop developed for caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease or related dementia. The investigators will conduct a hybrid effectiveness-implementation randomized controlled trial that will enroll and randomize 640 rural dementia caregivers into two groups: the intervention (workshop) group and the attention control group. Caregivers will be recruited throughout the United States. Primary outcomes will be caregiver stress and depression symptoms. The investigators hypothesize that stress scores and depression symptoms will be significantly improved at 12 months in the intervention group versus control group. The investigators will also identify key strengths (facilitators) and weaknesses (barriers) of workshop implementation. The investigators will use the RE-AIM implementation framework and a mixed methods approach to identify implementation characteristics pertinent to both caregivers and rural community organizations. If the Building Better Caregivers workshop is proven to be effective, this research has the potential to open new research horizons, particularly on how to reach and effectively support isolated dementia caregivers in rural areas with an intervention that is scalable, even in low-resourced settings. If the workshop can achieve its goals with rural dementia caregivers, some of those most isolated, it would also be expected to be scalable in other low-resourced settings (e.g., in urban or suburban environments).

    at UCSF

  • Surgery in Treating Patients With Early Stage Anal Canal or Perianal Cancer and HIV Infection

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies surgery in treating patients with anal canal or perianal cancer that is small and has not spread deeply into the tissues and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Local surgery may be a safer treatment with fewer side effects than bigger surgery or radiation and chemotherapy.

    at UCSF

  • The LATITUDE Study: Long-Acting Therapy to Improve Treatment SUccess in Daily LifE

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy, safety, and durability of two different strategies to treat participants with a history of sub-optimal adherence and control of their HIV infection: long-acting (LA) antiretroviral therapy (ART) and all-oral standard of care (SOC).

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Very Early Intensive Treatment of HIV-Infected Infants to Achieve HIV Remission

    open to all eligible people

    The study will explore the effects of early intensive antiretroviral therapy (ART) on achieving HIV remission (HIV RNA below the limit of detection of the assay) among HIV-infected infants.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Impact of DAA Uptake in Controlling HCV Epidemic and Modeling Interventions for HCV Elimination Among HIV-infected Persons in San Diego

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A retrospective and prospective study among people living with HIV (PLWH) that assesses hepatitis C (HCV) treatment uptake during periods before and after direct acting antivirals (DAA) introduction, and its impact on the HCV epidemic among PLWH.

    at UCSD

  • Analytical Treatment Interruption (ATI) to Assess the Immune System's Ability to Control HIV in Participants Who Became HIV-infected During the HVTN 704/HPTN 085 AMP Study

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to learn whether having the AMP Study antibody (called VRC01) in a person's body might help their immune system control HIV better, even without HIV medication called antiretroviral therapy or ART, if they get HIV. This study will evaluate the viral and immune system responses in an Analytical Treatment Interruption (ATI), in participants who received VRC01 or placebo and got HIV while enrolled in HVTN 704/HPTN 085 (NCT02716675). Participants in this study will stop taking their HIV medication. They will stay off HIV medication unless and until the HIV levels in their blood show that their immune system is unable to control the HIV or they meet other ART re-start criteria as noted in section "Detailed Description". While they are not taking HIV medication, their HIV levels will be tested frequently, and their health will be monitored closely. This is called an analytical treatment interruption, or an ATI. An ATI is an experimental procedure that is only used in carefully monitored research.

    at UCLA

  • Digital Behavioral Therapy for Sleep Problems

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Insomnia is very common, especially in HIV population (up to 73%), and contributes to the development of other conditions such as depression, dementia, inflammation, obesity, and heart diseases. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is known to improve insomnia. However, it has never been tested in HIV-positive patients. The investigators aim to examine the Internet version of this therapy in HIV-positive patients because the availability of CBT-I is very limited while the cost is high. The investigators will test this internet version, also called digital CBT-I (dCBTI), against sleep hygiene education (SHE), a commonly prescribed set of instructions in clinical practice, in 60 HIV-positive patients with insomnia invited from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) Los Angeles site. The investigators aim to test if dCBTI or SHE improves insomnia in this patient group. This trial involves a behavioral treatment that can be done from home with minimal side effects and includes neither medications nor invasive interventions. Lastly, this trial will provide important pilot data for a larger trial testing long-term effects of insomnia treatment in HIV-positive patients.

    at UCLA

  • Digital Health Feedback System for Longitudinal Measurement of Medication Adherence During Anti-Retroviral (ARV)Therapy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study uses an ingestion sensor and a wearable sensor (worn as a patch on the skin), which are new Proteus Digital Health (PDH) technologies approved by the FDA, to collect information about patients taking their ARV medications. The wearable sensor records information, which is uploaded wirelessly to a mobile device and then to a secure computer. Together the sensors and the mobile device transmitting the information to the study computer are called a digital health feedback system (DHFS), which gives healthcare providers information about when patients have taken their ARV medications. The purpose of the study is to demonstrate that the DHFS is easy to use and acceptable to the HIV patient population; that patients will persist with its use; and that the system provides valid, accurate measures of adherence.

    at UCSD

  • Effectiveness of a New Anti-HIV Drug (AG1549) Plus Viracept (Nelfinavir) Plus Combivir (Zidovudine/Lamivudine) in HIV-Infected Patients

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    The purpose of this study is to look at the effectiveness of giving a new anti-HIV drug (AG1549) plus Viracept (nelfinavir) plus Combivir (a tablet containing zidovudine plus lamivudine) to HIV-infected patients who are not taking anti-HIV drugs.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Evaluating the Use of Pitavastatin to Reduce the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in HIV-Infected Adults

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    People infected with HIV are at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study will evaluate the use of pitavastatin to reduce the risk of CVD in adults infected with HIV who are on antiretroviral therapy (ART). The REPRIEVE trial consists of two parallel identical protocols: - REPRIEVE (A5332) is funded by the NHLBI, with additional infrastructure support provided by the NIAID, and is conducted in U.S and select international sites (approximately 120 sites in 11 countries). - REPRIEVE (EU5332) is co-sponsored by NEAT ID and MGH, and is conducted at 13 sites in Spain.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Evaluation of Doxycycline Post-exposure Prophylaxis to Reduce Sexually Transmitted Infections in PrEP Users and HIV-infected Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to understand if taking an antibiotic called doxycycline by mouth as soon as possible after sexual contact without a condom can reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis. The study will also look at the safety of doxycycline PEP and the impact that PEP may have on the bacteria that cause STIs as well as on bacteria that normally live on the body. While doxycycline is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), taking doxycycline immediately after sexual contact to prevent infection is investigational and is not approved by the FDA for this use. Participants will take part in the study for 1 year.

    at UCSF

  • INcreasing Statin Prescribing in HIV Behavioral Economics REsearch

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among people living with HIV. Recent studies have demonstrated that patients with HIV experience a 50-100% increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke compared to HIV-uninfected persons. They also face higher risks of stroke, sudden death, and heart failure. However, evidence-based statin therapy-which is safe in this population and highly effective at reducing cardiovascular risk-is under-prescribed. The investigators propose a multi-level intervention to increase evidence-based statin prescribing by addressing barriers at these levels. The implementation intervention includes two strategies: (1) tailored education at the leadership, provider, and patient levels, and (2) behavioral economics-informed feedback for providers.

    at UCLA

  • Prevalence and Predictors of Neurocognitive Impairment Among HIV-infected Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Despite the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the prevalence of neurocognitive impairment among HIV-infected patients continues to be an important issue. Although severe forms of AIDS-related dementia have diminished, milder forms of cognitive impairment have been noted among approximately 30% of asymptomatic HIV patients. Studies among HIV-infected U.S. military personnel regarding neurocognitive function have largely been limited to the early 1990s, before the advent of HAART. In these studies subtle neurobehavioral changes were noted among asymptomatic HIV-positive military personnel. This study proposes to determine the prevalence of neurocognitive deficits among HIV-positive military beneficiaries during the era of HAART who are participants of the U.S. Military HIV Natural History Study. The prevalence ascertained in this study will be compared to HIV-negative military beneficiaries who are demographically similar to the HIV positive group. The sample size of the study is to have complete testing on 200 HIV positive and 50 HIV-negative participants; due to the possibility of attrition before study completion, the investigators will enroll up to 300 participants (240 HIV-positive and 60 HIV-negative) to achieve this sample size. The investigators' rates among HIV-positive patients found in this study will also be contextualized in the setting of the prevalence of prior neurocognitive deficits seen in a HIV positive U.S. military population studied in the 1990s, contemporary rates among civilian HIV-infected persons, and normative values in the general HIV-negative population. Compared to other data in the field of neuropsychology, this study is novel in that the HIV population studied is composed largely of HIV patients who have been diagnosed early in their HIV infection; have open, free access to antiretrovirals to begin therapy earlier than most other cohorts; and consists of highly-functioning, educated individuals.

    at UCSD

Our lead scientists for HIV-Associated Dementia research studies include .

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