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Human Papillomavirus clinical trials at UC Health
20 in progress, 7 open to new patients

  • Anal Cytology Collection Procedures in Predicting High-Grade Anal Dysplasia in Men Who Have Sex With Men

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial compares three anal cytology collection procedures (collected at a single visit) in men who have sex with men (MSM). It also compares two different tests for human papilloma virus, the virus that causes high grade anal dysplasia, which is thought to occur before anal cancer. This study may help doctors develop better screening for high-grade anal dysplasia in MSM in order to identify those who need to return for additional screening and treatment.

    at UCLA

  • CA-IX, p16, Proliferative Markers, and HPV in Diagnosing Cervical Lesions in Patients With Abnormal Cervical Cells

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This research trial studies carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA-IX), p16, proliferative markers, and human papilloma virus (HPV) in diagnosing cervical lesions in patients with abnormal cervical cells. Studying biomarkers in abnormal cervical cells may improve the ability to find cervical lesions and plan effective treatment.

    at UCLA UC Irvine UCSD

  • Immunogenicity of Nonavalent HPV Vaccine Administered Prior to Renal Transplantation in Adult Women: A Prospective, Single-Arm, Multi-Center Clinical Trial

    open to eligible females ages 18-49

    This trial studies whether the nonavalent human papillomavirus vaccine given to adult women prior to kidney transplantation can help the body build and maintain an effective immune response during the post-transplant period when they receive immunosuppressive drugs to prevent transplant rejection. This study will help inform our scientific understanding about vaccine-induced immune responses among immunosuppressed individuals.

    at UCSF

  • Phase Ib Study of Alpelisib With Cisplatin in Patients With HPV+ Solid Tumor Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose and side effects of alpelisib and cisplatin in treating patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) positive solid tumor malignancies. Alpelisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving alpelisib and cisplatin may work better in treating patients with solid tumor malignancies.

    at UCSF

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Durvalumab With or Without Tremelimumab Before Surgery in Treating Participants With Human Papillomavirus Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Caner

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase Ib/II trial studies the side effects and how well stereotactic body radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab before surgery work in treating participants with human papillomavirus positive oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a specialized radiation therapy that sends x-rays directly to the tumor using smaller doses over several days and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving stereotactic body radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab before surgery may work better in treating participants with oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer.

    at UCLA

  • Topical or Ablative Treatment in Preventing Anal Cancer in Patients With HIV and Anal High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions

    open to eligible people ages 35 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial compares topical or ablative treatment with active monitoring in preventing anal cancer in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Anal HSIL is tissue in the anal canal that has been damaged by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and is at risk for turning into anal cancer. It is not yet known if treating HSIL is more effective than active monitoring in preventing patients from developing anal cancer.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • VGX-3100 and Electroporation in Treating Patients With HIV-Positive High-Grade Anal Lesions

    open to eligible people ages 27 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the use of human papillomavirus (HPV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) plasmids therapeutic vaccine VGX-3100 (VGX-3100) and electroporation in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive high-grade anal lesions. Vaccines made from DNA may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Electroporation helps pores in your body's cells take in the drug to strengthen your immune system's response. Giving VGX-3100 and electroporation together may work better in treating patients with high-grade anal lesions.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Anal HPV Tests in Screening for Cell Changes in the Anus in Patients With HIV

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This clinical trial studies anal human papillomavirus (HPV) tests in screening for cell changes in the anus in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Screening tests may help doctors find cancer cells early and plan better treatment for anal cancer. Completing multiple screening tests may help find the best method for detecting cell changes in the anus.

    at UCSF UCLA

  • Comparative Effectiveness of System Interventions to Increase HPV Vaccine Receipt in FQHCs

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    UCLA and Northeast Valley Health Center (NEVHC), a large, multi-site Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), are partnering to address underutilization of the prophylactic HPV vaccine among underserved, ethnic minority adolescents receiving care through FQHCs. We will use a cluster randomized 2x2 stepped-wedge factorial study design, implemented in seven NEVHC clinics, to compare the effectiveness of parent reminders (mailed and text), multi-component clinic system strategies, a combined intervention (parent reminders + clinic system strategies) and usual care on HPV vaccine series completion among NEVHC adolescent patients. FQHCs provide essential health care to underserved groups and have the infrastructure to sustain effective strategies to improve preventive care delivery. Therefore, study findings will be invaluable for informing future efforts to improve HPV vaccination at the population-level.

    at UCLA

  • HPV Centralized R/R RCT #2 - New York State

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The work done in this trial builds off of the work previously conducted by this same research group in clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT03057379. Due to some changes in study design, protocol, and cohort of interest, a new registration was warranted. The overarching goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability of utilizing statewide immunization information systems (IISs) to conduct centralized reminder recall (R/R) to improve human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates among adolescents 11-14 years of age. The latest recommendations from the ACIP, as of February 2017, modified the vaccination schedule for the HPV series for eligible adolescents ages 11-14. Adolescents who receive dose #1 between the ages of 11 and 14 are now eligible for their second and final dose 6-12 months after their initial dose. Despite U.S. guidelines for vaccinating all adolescents starting at age 11 with the HPV vaccine, in 2012 only 53% of 13-17 year old females had >1 dose and 35% had 3 doses; 21% of teen males had a vaccination. Modeling studies predict marked reduction in HPV associated cancers and in disparities in these cancers if high HPV vaccination rates can be achieved. With this new dosing schedule for adolescents, the research team proposes to conduct a randomized control trial (RCT) utilizing the capabilities of the State Immunization Information System (IIS), and create a HPV-specific R/R autodialer and text message to be delivered to the parents of patients ages 11-14 of randomly selected practices within New York State (excluding NYC). Upon conclusion of this trial, researchers will develop a toolkit for dissemination so that other state IIS systems may replicate these centralized reminder recall procedures.

    at UCLA

  • HPV IIS Reminder/Recall- New York State

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The overarching goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and sustainability of utilizing statewide Immunization Information Systems (IIS) to conduct centralized reminder/recall (R/R) to improve Human Papiloma Virus (HPV) vaccination rates among adolescents ages 11-17.

    at UCLA

  • Increasing Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Uptake Via General Health Messaging

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Background: Prevention of cervical cancer and genital warts could be achieved by immunization with the prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines commercially available. However, in the U.S. only 38% of females and 14% of males in the recommended age group (9-26 years) receive the complete, three-dose HPV vaccine. Because the HPV vaccine is covered under the Vaccine for Children Program, the underinsured and uninsured have no-cost access. Nonetheless, data from Los Angeles county suggest that HPV vaccination rates among the uninsured and underinsured groups are significantly lower than the national average, likely related to knowledge of the vaccine, transportation, number of doses and concern of side effects. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of health oriented text messaging to increase HPV vaccine uptake versus standard health messaging (Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) HPV vaccine information flyers). Hypothesis: We hypothesize that receiving general health messaging, including messages regarding the benefits of the HPV vaccine, will increase HPV vaccine uptake. Text messaging will also be more successful in reaching the uninsured and underinsured populations than will traditional flyers/information pamphlets used in clinics. Methods: A cluster randomized trial design will be used to recruit participants from four clinics in Los Angeles County which offer pediatric vaccination to uninsured and underinsured children. The sample will include women aged 18-45 years of age. Two of the sites will be randomized to the text messaging arm and the other clinic will be randomized to the control arm (standard messaging: CDC flyers and pamphlets available for patients at the clinic). Outcome measures will be HPV vaccinations rates at those clinics. Rates will be defined into groups who received 1 dose, 2 doses and 3 doses. Anticipated Results: We expect to find statistically significant higher HPV vaccination rates among children and women in the text messaging study arm compared to the control arm. Implications and Future Studies: This pilot study will give us preliminary data to submit a larger randomized controlled trial to examine the efficacy of text messaging.

    at UCLA

  • Increasing Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Uptake in Low-Income, Ethnic Minority Adolescents in Los Angeles County

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The primary aim of the project is to increase human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine receipt rates among low-income, ethnic minority adolescents (girls and boys 11-17 years of age) in Los Angeles County. We will accomplish this goal by implementing and rigorously evaluating interventions in multiple venues that serve our target population, including the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH) and two large Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). Our hypotheses are: Primary hypothesis: 1. The intervention group will have a higher rate of HPV vaccine initiation at follow-up compared to the control group. Secondary hypothesis: 2. The intervention group will have higher vaccine completion rates (3 doses) at follow-up compared to the control group.

    at UCLA

  • Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Human Papilloma Virus-Related Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well ipilimumab works in treating patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-related cervical cancer that has come back or that has spread to other areas of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, can find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them.

    at UC Davis

  • Marketability of a Technology-based Intervention to Increase HPV Vaccination

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The overall goal of this SBIR Phase II project is to reduce cancer rates by marketing a brief, easily implemented technology-based intervention that increases human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among Planned Parenthood and other clients. The intervention's innovative technology allows for the investigators' narrative videos to be presented along will reminder texts. It will be evaluated for use in waiting rooms and promises to overcome vaccination barriers among high risk but underserved low SES and minority populations.

    at UC Irvine

  • Phase 1-2 Study of ADXS11-001 or MEDI4736 Alone or Combo In Cervical or HPV+ Head & Neck Cancer

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Part A: (ADXS11-001 + MEDI4736 Combination Therapy) will determine the safety and tolerability of the combination and to identify a RP2D. Part B: Phase 2 design which will randomize subjects 1:1 to either MEDI4736 alone or MEDI4736+ADXS11-001 in subjects who have failed at least 1 prior systemic treatment for their recurrent/persistent or metastatic cervical cancer.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Recombinant Human Papillomavirus Nonavalent Vaccine in Preventing Human Papilloma Virus in Younger Healthy Participants

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common sexually-transmitted virus which causes infections that usually last only a few months, but sometimes can last a long time and cause cancers of the cervix, vagina, vulva, anus or oropharynx over many years among adults. This phase IIA trial studies how well does the nonavalent HPV vaccine (which can prevent nine different types of HPV) work when given in an alternative dosing schedule to heathy young research participants.

    at UCLA

  • Study of Topical ABI-1968 in Subjects With Precancerous Anal Lesions Resulting From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study evaluates the use of ABI-1968, a topical cream, in the treatment of anal precancerous lesions in adults with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

    at UCSF

  • Transoral Surgery Followed By Low-Dose or Standard-Dose Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With HPV Positive Stage III-IVA Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well transoral surgery followed by low-dose or standard-dose radiation therapy works in treating patients with human papilloma virus (HPV) positive stage III-IVA oropharyngeal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving radiation therapy with chemotherapy may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery. It is not yet known how much extra treatment needs to be given after surgery.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • TRYHARD: Radiation Therapy Plus Cisplatin With or Without Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Head and Neck Cancer.

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    PURPOSE: This trial is studying if and how well lapatinib adds to the effectiveness of radiation therapy plus cisplatin in patients who have head and neck cancer that is not related to the HPV virus.

    at UCSD UCSF

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