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Kidney Disease clinical trials at University of California Health

40 in progress, 22 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Comparison Study of the Experimental Human Acellular Vessel For Dialysis in End-Stage Renal Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The main purpose of this study is to compare the Human Acellular Vessel (HAV) with arteriovenous fistula (AVF) when used for hemodialysis access

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • A Pilot Feasibility Trial of Thyroid Hormone Replacement in Dialysis Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    Hypothyroidism, defined by elevated thyrotropin (TSH) levels, is a common endocrine complication of chronic kidney disease that has been associated with impaired quality of life and cardiovascular complications. While levothyroxine is one of the most frequently prescribed medications in chronic kidney disease patients, little is known about its efficacy and safety in this population. This study will investigate 1) whether levothyroxine adequately lowers thyrotropin (TSH) levels to therapeutic target ranges, and 2) if thyroid hormone replacement improves quality of life and cardiovascular markers, without leading to wasting in dialysis patients.

    at UC Irvine

  • A Study of Etelcalcetide in Pediatric Subjects With Secondary Hyperparathyroidism and Chronic Kidney Disease on Hemodialysis

    open to eligible people ages 0-18

    This is a Phase 3 Study of Etelcalcetide in Pediatric Subjects With Secondary Hyperparathyroidism and Chronic Kidney Disease on Hemodialysis

    at UCLA

  • A Trial of Bardoxolone Methyl in Patients With ADPKD - FALCON

    open to eligible people ages 12-70

    This international, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 3 trial will study the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of bardoxolone methyl in qualified patients with ADPKD. Approximately 850 patients will be enrolled.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • An Extended Access Program for Bardoxolone Methyl in Patients With CKD (EAGLE)

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This extended access study will assess the long-term safety and tolerability of bardoxolone methyl in qualified patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who previously participated in one of the qualifying clinical studies with bardoxolone methyl. Patients will remain in the study until bardoxolone methyl is available through commercial channels or until patient withdrawal, whichever is sooner.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Atrasentan in Patients With IgA Nephropathy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The ALIGN Study is a phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to compare the efficacy and safety of atrasentan to placebo in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) at risk of progressive loss of renal function.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Atrasentan in Patients With Proteinuric Glomerular Diseases

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The AFFINITY Study is a phase 2, open-label, basket study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of atrasentan in patients with proteinuric glomerular disease who are at risk of progressive loss of renal function.

    at UCLA

  • Belimumab With Rituximab for Primary Membranous Nephropathy

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of belimumab and intravenous rituximab co-administration at inducing a complete remission (CR) compared to rituximab alone in participants with PM. Background: Primary membranous nephropathy (MN) is among the most common causes of nephrotic syndrome in adults. MN affects individuals of all ages and races. The peak incidence of MN is in the fifth decade of life. Primary MN is recognized to be an autoimmune disease, a disease where the body's own immune system causes damage to kidneys. This damage can cause the loss of too much protein in the urine. Drugs used to treat MN aim to reduce the attack by one's own immune system on the kidneys by blocking inflammation and reducing the immune system's function. These drugs can have serious side effects and often do not cure the disease. There is a need for new treatments for MN that are better at improving the disease while reducing fewer treatment associated side effects. In this study, researchers will evaluate if treatment with a combination of two different drugs, belimumab and rituximab, is effective at blocking the immune attacks on the kidney compared to rituximab alone. Rituximab works by decreasing a type of immune cell, called B cells. B cells are known to have a role in MN. Once these cells are removed, disease may become less active or even inactive. However, after stopping treatment, the body will make new B cells which may cause disease to become active again. Belimumab works by decreasing the new B cells produced by the body and, may even change the type of new B cells subsequently produced. Belimumab is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat systemic lupus erythematosus (also referred to as lupus or SLE). Rituximab is approved by the FDA to treat some types of cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis. Neither rituximab nor belimumab is approved by the FDA to treat MN. Treatment with a combination of belimumab and rituximab has not been studied in individuals with MN, but it is currently being tested in other autoimmune diseases, including lupus nephritis and Sjögren's syndrome.

    at UCLA

  • Dosimetry of Tc-99m-Tilmanocept

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This proposal will use kidney SPECT/CT of Tc-99m-tilmanocept to evaluate the mesangial changes seen in diabetics across the spectrum of kidney disease as well as persons with hypertensive kidney disease, the next most common cause of kidney disease in patients with diabetes. We aim to demonstrate that these different disease types and stages can be differentiated with Tc-99m-tilmanocept SPECT/CT and can thus be used for future trials evaluating early diagnosis and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    at UCSD

  • Exercise and Energy Production in Chronic Kidney Disease Study

    “Adults ages 30-80 with Chronic Kidney Disease can participate in a new exercise study to help improve muscle function. See if you qualify!”

    open to eligible people ages 30-75

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction (sarcopenia) is an under-recognized target organ complication of CKD with substantial adverse clinical consequences of disability, hospitalization, and death. Sarcopenia in this proposal is defined by impaired metabolism and physical function associated with decreased skeletal muscle mass or function. Skeletal muscle tissue relies on mitochondria to efficiently utilize oxygen to generate ATP. Impaired mitochondrial energetics is a central mechanism of sarcopenia in CKD. The investigators propose a series of studies designed to shed light on the pathophysiology of sarcopenia in persons with CKD not treated with dialysis. Investigators will conduct a randomized-controlled intervention trial of combined resistance training and aerobic exercise vs. health education to assess changes in skeletal muscle mitochondrial function, metabolism and physical function. Investigators hypothesize that exercise improves mitochondrial function and physical function in persons with CKD. If successful, these experiments will identify novel pathophysiologic mechanisms for CKD-associated sarcopenia. The proposed study will provide useful insight into benefits associated with exercise among patients with CKD and investigate mechanisms associated with improved metabolism, muscle function and physical function in population.

    at UC Davis

  • Ferric Citrate and Chronic Kidney Disease in Children

    open to eligible people ages 6-17

    We will conduct a 12-month, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to assess the effects of therapy with ferric citrate (FC) on changes in intact FGF23 levels (iFGF23, primary endpoint) in 160 pediatric patients (80 in each of the two arms) aged 6-17 years of either sex with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3-4 and age-appropriate normal serum phosphate levels. Participants will be randomized to one of the two groups: 1) FC or 2) FC placebo. Participants will be recruited from 12 core clinical sites.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Global Study of MK-2060 (Anti-Factor XI Monoclonal Antibody) in Participants With End Stage Renal Disease Receiving Hemodialysis (FXI Hemodialysis Study) (MK-2060-007)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of two different doses of MK-2060 (a monoclonal antibody against Factor XI) in end stage renal disease (ESRD) participants receiving hemodialysis via an arteriovenous graft (AVG). Data from this study will be used to aid dose selection of MK-2060 in future studies. The primary hypothesis is that at least one of the MK-2060 doses is superior to placebo in increasing the time to first occurrence of AVG event.

    at UCLA

  • Mild Hypothermia and Acute Kidney Injury in Liver Transplantation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), or worsening kidney function, is a common complication after liver transplantation (20-90% in published studies). Patients who experience AKI after liver transplantation have higher mortality, increased graft loss, longer hospital and intensive care unit stays, and more progression to chronic kidney disease compared with those who do not. In this study, half of the participants will have their body temperature cooled to slightly lower than normal (mild hypothermia) for a portion of the liver transplant operation, while the other half will have their body temperature maintained at normal. The study will evaluate if mild hypothermia protects from AKI during liver transplantation.

    at UCSF

  • Phase 2/3 Adaptive Study of VX-147 in Adults With APOL1- Mediated Proteinuric Kidney Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of VX-147 in participants aged 18 years and older with apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1)-mediated proteinuric kidney disease.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Retro-active Immunological Tolerance in Patients With Well-functioning Pre-existing HLA-identical Kidney Transplants

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The study seeks to determine if patients with a pre-existing, well-functioning kidney transplant from a HLA-identical living donor can be withdrawn from immunosuppressive medications without compromising allograft function through hematopoietic stem cell (HPSC) infusion from the same donor. HPSC infusion will be preceded by a conditioning regimen of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (rATG).

    at UCLA

  • Study of Ravulizumab in Proliferative Lupus Nephritis (LN) or Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy (IgAN)

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ravulizumab administered by intravenous (IV) infusion compared to placebo and demonstrate proof-of-concept of the efficacy of terminal complement inhibition in participants with LN (LN Cohort) or IgAN (IgAN Cohort).

    at UCLA

  • Study of the Safety and Efficacy of OMS721 in Patients With Immunoglobulin A (IgA) Nephropathy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of OMS721 in patients with IgA nephropathy. The study will assess proteinuria by 24-hour urine protein excretion (UPE) in g/day at 36 weeks from beginning of treatment.

    at UCLA

  • The Arteriovenous Vascular (AV) ACCESS Trial

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    This study is to prospectively compare the effectiveness and safety of the two types of arteriovenous access placement (fistula or graft) in older adults with end stage kidney disease and multiple chronic conditions

    at UCLA

  • The Home Blood Pressure (BP) Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The main study will be a two arm 10-month, cross-over randomized controlled trial of 200 participants treated with end-stage-kidney-disease treated with in-center hemodialysis in the Seattle and San Francisco area comparing a strategy of targeting home vs. pre-dialysis systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg to reduce rates of intradialytic hypotension. The target systolic blood pressure of <140 mmHg in both treatment groups will be achieved using an algorithm of dry weight adjustment and anti-hypertensive medication adjustment.

    at UCSF

  • Trial of Pirfenidone to Prevent Progression in Chronic Kidney Disease

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    Kidney disease is a global health problem, affecting more than 10% of the world's population and more than half of adults over 70 years of age in the United States. Persons with kidney disease are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, heart failure, physical function decline, and mortality. Kidney scarring is a dominant factor in the development of kidney disease. Our group has evaluated several tests to determine the severity of scarring without requiring kidney biopsies, using MRI imaging scans and evaluating markers of scarring that we can measure in the urine. In this study we will use these measures to evaluate pirfenidone as a promising potential new treatment for patients with kidney disease.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • A Study of Experimental Genetic Testing for the APOL1 Gene in Kidney Transplantation (APOLLO Study)

    open to all eligible people

    The APOLLO study is being done in an attempt to improve outcomes after kidney transplantation and to improve the safety of living kidney donation based upon variation in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1). Genes control what is inherited from a family, such as eye color or blood type. Variation in APOL1 can cause kidney disease. African Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, Hispanic Blacks, and Africans are more likely to have the APOL1 gene variants that cause kidney disease. APOLLO will test DNA from kidney donors and recipients of kidney transplants for APOL1 to determine effects on kidney transplant-related outcomes.

    at UCSF

  • Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network

    open to eligible people ages up to 80 years

    Minimal change disease (MCD), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and Membranous nephropathy (MN), generate an enormous individual and societal financial burden, accounting for approximately 12% of prevalent end stage renal disease (ESRD) cases (2005) at an annual cost in the US of more than $3 billion. However, the clinical classification of these diseases is widely believed to be inadequate by the scientific community. Given the poor understanding of MCD/FSGS and MN biology, it is not surprising that the available therapies are imperfect. The therapies lack a clear biological basis, and as many families have experienced, they are often not beneficial, and in fact may be significantly toxic. Given these observations, it is essential that research be conducted that address these serious obstacles to effectively caring for patients. In response to a request for applications by the National Institutes of Health, Office of Rare Diseases (NIH, ORD) for the creation of Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortia, a number of affiliated universities joined together with The NephCure Foundation the NIDDK, the ORDR, and the University of Michigan in collaboration towards the establishment of a Nephrotic Syndrome (NS) Rare Diseases Clinical Research Consortium. Through this consortium the investigators hope to understand the fundamental biology of these rare diseases and aim to bank long-term observational data and corresponding biological specimens for researchers to access and further enrich.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • A Study Testing the Use of a Perivascular Sirolimus Formulation (Sirogen) in ESRD Patients Undergoing AV Fistula Surgery

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The primary study objective is to evaluate the benefit of the Sirolimus eluting Collagen implant (SeCI; Sirogen), a single dose prophylactic treatment delivered intraoperatively at the time of surgical creation of an arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis vascular access.

    at UCSF

  • A Trial to Learn How Well Finerenone Works and How Safe it is in Adult Participants With Non-diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Researchers are looking for a better way to treat people who have non-diabetic chronic kidney disease (non-diabetic CKD). The trial treatment, finerenone, is being developed to help people who have long lasting kidney disease, also known as chronic kidney disease (CKD). It works by blocking a certain hormone called aldosterone that causes injury and inflammation in the heart and kidney which is known to play a role in CKD. In this trial, the researchers want to learn if finerenone helps to slow down the worsening of the participants' non-diabetic CKD compared to a placebo. A placebo looks like a trial treatment but does not have any medicine in it. The trial will include about 1,580 men and women who are at least 18 years old. The participants will take finerenone or a placebo once a day as tablets by mouth. All of the participants will also continue to take their current medicine for their CKD. The participants will be in the trial for up to about 50 months. During the trial, the doctors will collect blood and urine samples and check the participants' health. The participants will also answer questions about how they are feeling and what adverse events they are having. An adverse event is a medical problem that happens during the trial. Doctors keep track of all adverse events that happen in trials, even if they do not think the adverse events might be related to the trial treatments.

    at UCLA

  • ACEi ARB Withdrawal in CKD Patients

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The American Heart Association guidelines for high blood pressure (BP) currently recommend using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) as first-line therapy for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3 or above. However, the prevalence of ACEi and ARB use in patients with CKD stage 4 or 5 is low, and current BP guidelines acknowledge the lack of solid evidence to support the benefit of using these agents in advanced CKD.This study seeks to conduct a pilot trial to determine the safety and feasibility of ACEi and/or ARB continuation (intervention) versus withdrawal (control) in patients with advanced CKD.

    at UCSF

  • Advancing Understanding of Transportation Options

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This Stage II randomized, controlled, longitudinal trial seeks to assess the acceptability, feasibility, and effects of a driving decision aid use among geriatric patients and providers. This multi-site trial will (1) test the driving decision aid (DDA) in improving decision making and quality (knowledge, decision conflict, values concordance and behavior intent); and (2) determine its effects on specific subpopulations of older drivers (stratified for cognitive function, decisional capacity, and attitudinally readiness for a mobility transition). The overarching hypotheses are that the DDA will help older adults make high-quality decisions, which will mitigate the negative psychosocial impacts of driving reduction, and that optimal DDA use will target certain populations and settings.

    at UCSD

  • Angiotensin 2 for Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a disease in which patients with cirrhosis (end stage liver failure) develop secondary kidney injury and failure. The current treatment available in the United States is a combination of octreotide and midodrine, which are meant to decrease the release of those hormones and raise the blood pressure, respectively, which would increase blood flow to the kidneys. Angiotensin 2 (Ang2) is a new vasopressor drug that was approved by the FDA in December 2017 for patients with low blood pressure and has been shown to have similar effects to octreotide and midodrine. This study will investigate whether Ang2 reverses HRS among patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at Ronald Reagan Medical Center. Our study population will be patients with HRS who are already or will be admitted to the ICU. HRS will be defined by new internationally accepted guidelines published by the International Club of Ascites. All patients who are consented will undergo an Ang2 response trial, where low-dose Ang2 will be administered for 4 hours to see how the patients respond. This will help us characterize the nature of the patients' kidney failure for later analysis. Patients will then be randomized into the control group or the study group. Patients in the control group will receive octreotide (a subcutaneous injection) and midodrine (an oral drug). Patients in the study group will continue receiving intravenous infusion of Ang2. Patients in both groups will also receive albumin, a protein found commonly in human blood. Treatment will continue in both groups for four days, until complete reversal of HRS, dialysis, or death. Our primary outcome will be rate of reversal of HRS, defined as improvement in kidney function.

    at UCLA

  • Comparing Surgical and Endovascular Arteriovenous Fistula Creation

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) who use hemodialysis to filter their blood require vascular access for the dialysis machine; the most common type of vascular access is called an arteriovenous fistula (AVF). The AVF is a direct connect between an artery and vein. Until recently, AVFs were only created through surgery that requires general anesthesia and opening up the skin. Now there are 2 FDA-approved devices designed to create AVFs using endovascular techniques (endoAVF), which means a device that goes through the skin instead of opening the skin up. Also patients are not required to be under general anesthesia, they can receive local anesthesia instead. Due to the relatively new approval of these devices, there is not a randomized study to compare the results of endoAVF versus surgAVF. This study is a pilot study for an eventually larger scale study to compare the results of endoAVF versus surgAVF. The study aims to determine what the proportion of patients seeking hemodialysis access could qualify for receiving either an endoAVF , surgAVF, or both. Patients who are screened for hemodialysis access must undergo a duplex ultrasound of the blood vessels in the arm to confirm correct sizing. If participants qualify for both procedures they will be randomized to either endoAVF or surgAVF and will track the clinical and patient-reported outcomes of each procedure. Our pilot study hopes to enroll 90 participants. Those outcomes will inform a larger scale study. If the potential participant chooses to abstain from participation in the randomized trial, preferring to decide the method of AVF creation, we will offer to them a chance to join an endoAVF/surgAVF registry that will track the clinical outcomes of the procedure via medical record monitoring.

    at UCLA

  • Comparison of the Human Acellular Vessel (HAV) With ePTFE Grafts as Conduits for Hemodialysis

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The main purpose of this study is to compare the Human Acellular Vessel (HAV) with ePTFE grafts when used for hemodialysis access.

    at UC Irvine

  • Dietary Intervention to Improve Kidney Transplant Outcomes

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Randomized controlled trial of a curriculum intervention teaching patients to eat a whole-food plant-based dietary pattern versus standard of care in kidney transplant recipients within the first few months of transplant

    at UC Davis

  • EMPA-KIDNEY (The Study of Heart and Kidney Protection With Empagliflozin)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary aim of the study is to investigate the effect of empagliflozin on kidney disease progression or cardiovascular death versus placebo on top of standard of care in patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease. After completion of the interventional part of the study (primary study completion) a subset of participants will be followed up in a post-trial observational (non-interventional) manner for cardio-renal outcomes (estimated study completion date).

    at UCLA

  • Long Term Extension Study in Patients With Primary Hyperoxaluria

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The proposed study is designed to provide patients previously enrolled in Phase 1 and 2 studies of DCR-PHXC and their siblings (<18 years old) long-term access to DCR-PHXC, and to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of DCR-PHXC in patients with PH.

    at UCSF

  • Pilot to Examine Risk and Feasibility of Remote Management of BP From CKD Through ESRD

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    The transition from chronic kidney disease (CKD) to end-stage renal disease ESRD is a vulnerable and challenging period of time for patients and providers. Suboptimal control of blood pressure is known to be common in patients with the advanced stages of CKD, and may contribute to their elevated risk of progression to ESRD, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. This proposal is a pilot randomized controlled trial designed to test whether intensive blood pressure lowering is feasible and safe in patients with advanced CKD as they transition to ESRD.

    at UCSF

  • Plant-Focused Nutrition in Patients With Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    In this pilot clinical trial, the investigators will recruit and randomize 120 patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD/DM) stages 3 to 5 to a patient-centered and flexible Plant-Focused Nutrition in Diabetes (PLAFOND) diet with >2/3 plant-based sources, which will be compared with a standard-of-care CKD diet, which is usually a low-potassium and low-salt diet, over a 6-month period. Through this study, the investigators will determine whether the plant-focused diet intervention is feasible for patient adherence, whether this diet is safe by avoiding malnutrition, frailty, and high potassium or glucose blood levels, and whether patient reported outcomes are favorably impacted.

    at UC Irvine

  • Tacrolimus/Everolimus vs. Tacrolimus/MMF in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients Using the MATE Score

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The TEAMMATE Trial will enroll 210 pediatric heart transplant patients from 25 centers at 6 months post-transplant and follow each patient for 2.5 years. Half of the participants will receive everolimus and low-dose tacrolimus and the other half will receive tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. The trial will determine which treatment is better at reducing the cumulative risk of coronary artery vasculopathy, chronic kidney disease and biopsy proven-acute cellular rejection without an increase in graft loss due to all causes (e.g. infection, PTLD, antibody mediated rejection).

    at UCLA

  • The Effect of Loop Diuretics on Severity and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective is to safely determine if the investigators can identify the severity of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) early in the course of the disease. Once enrolled the investigators will draw blood and urine for novel and standard biomarkers. The investigators are attempting to determine if these biomarkers can forecast the course of AKI (need for dialysis, death and renal recovery). The investigators seek to determine how well physicians caring for those with AKI can predict the clinical course compared to these novel biomarkers of AKI and if there is an association between clinical course and 3 year patient outcomes.

    at UCSF

  • Veverimer and Mitochondrial Energetics in Persons With CKD

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Skeletal muscle metabolic health is critical for mobility and an underrecognized target of metabolic acidosis in chronic kidney disease. Impaired muscle mitochondrial metabolism underlies poor physical endurance increasing the risk of mobility disability. The proposed project will use precise in vivo tools to study the pathophysiology of poor physical endurance in a clinical trial treating metabolic acidosis among persons living with chronic kidney disease.

    at UC Davis

  • Global Assessment of Acute and Chronic Kidney Disease Incidence and Outcomes in Patients With COVID-19 Infection

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has created a significant strain on health care resources across the world for managing critically ill patients. Emerging reports from China, South Korea and Italy have reported varying incidence of acute kidney (AKI) ranging from 5-15% with a mortality of 60-80% however there is no systematic assessment of the risk factors, recognition, course and outcomes in patients with and without kidney disease whose course is complicated by AKI1-4. Patients with underlying CKD, immunosuppressed patients with renal transplants and ESKD patients are at high risk for COVID-19 infection and there is limited information on the effect of COVID-19 on the course and outcomes of these patients. The requirement for renal support including IHD, CRRT and sorbent based therapies has been variable and has contributed to the intense pressure on the nephrology and critical care providers for delivering these therapies. As the COVID-19 pandemic expands in the USA and abroad, there is an intense need to understand the epidemiology of the disease and the resources needed for renal support to inform clinical management and public health interventions. In this study, the investigators aim to investigate health care facilities across the world (hospital wards, ICU, outpatient clinics, nursing homes, healthcare centers) to draw a global picture of incidence, risk factors, resources available for treatment and prognosis of acute and chronic kidney disease in patient with COVID 19 confirmed infection. The aim is to identify trends in patients with acute and chronic kidney disease, determine its incidence, treatment and outcomes in different settings across the world. This information will be used to develop and implement educational tools and resources to prevent deaths from AKI and progression of CKD in this and following pandemics.

    at UCSD

  • Smarter Care Virginia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Low-value care is defined as patient care that provides no net benefit to patients in specific clinical scenarios, and it can cause patient harm. Prior research has documented high-rates of low-value care in Virginia, and this work has helped to inspire a Virginia government-sponsored quality improvement initiative to reduce low-value care. Funded by a $2.2 million Arnold Ventures grant, six large health systems in Virginia volunteered to partner with the Virginia Center for Health Innovation (VCHI) to reduce use of seven low-value health services (three preoperative testing measures, two cardiac screening measures, one diagnostic eye imaging measure, and one peripherally inserted central catheter [PICC] measure). These health systems include nearly 7,000 clinicians practicing across more than 1,000 sites. VCHI is implementing a step-wedge cluster-randomized physician peer-comparison feedback quality improvement intervention to reduce the use of these seven low-value services. VCHI will provide education, quality improvement training, and financial resources to each site, and VCHI will use the Milliman MedInsight Health Waste Calculator to create the peer comparison reports using the Virginia all payer claims database (APCD). Of note, the primary purpose of the initiative is to improve quality of care for Virginia residents and this initiative is not being done for research purposes, and step-wedge randomization is done to both ease logistical workload on VCHI and clarify impact of intervention (IRB exempt). Nevertheless, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) team plans to rigorously study and publish the impact of this intervention across the state of Virginia, which is why the UCLA team is preregistering the initiative. The UCLA team will use the Virginia APCD to evaluate the impact of the intervention. Because the APCD has a 1 year time-lag of data collection, the initial results of the impact of the intervention will not be available until August 2020 at the earliest.

    at UCLA

  • VIRTUUS Children's Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The objective of the VIRTUUS Children's Study is to adapt identified and validated adult noninvasive diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for the characterization of allograft status in pediatric recipients of kidney allografts.

    at UCLA UCSD

Our lead scientists for Kidney Disease research studies include .

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