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Kidney Neoplasm clinical trials at University of California Health

25 in progress, 12 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • 64Cu-GRIP B in Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II clinical trial evaluates if using a radiotracer targeting granzyme B, 64-copper granzyme targeting restricted interaction peptide specific to family member B (64 Cu-GRIP B) with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging can be safe and useful for detecting granzyme B (GrB) in patients with advanced cancers that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (advanced). Granzyme B (GrB) is a biomarker produced by immune cells in response to immunotherapy, which may highlight tumors that are more likely to respond to treatment. The study population is focused on genitourinary (GU) malignancies, including renal cell and urothelial cancer, two tumor types with high mutational burden and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes compared to other tumor types, and have a predictable response rate at the population level to immune checkpoint inhibitors. The information gained from this trial may allow researchers to develop future trials where 64Cu-GRIP B PET may serve as a biomarker to monitor early response to immunomodulatory therapies which are used to stimulate or suppress the immune system and may help the body fight cancer.

    at UCSF

  • KVA12123 Treatment Alone and in Combination With Pembrolizumab In Advanced Solid Tumors (VISTA-101)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this clinical trial is to test the safety and efficacy of KVA12123 alone or combined with pembrolizumab in patients with advanced solid tumors. The main questions this study aims to answer are: 1. What is the safety of KVA12123 when administered alone and in combination with pembrolizumab to advanced cancer patients? 2. What is an appropriate dose of KVA12123 to administer alone and in combination with pembrolizumab to advanced cancer patients in future clinical trials? Participants in this trial will be asked to: 1. Visit the clinical site every 1 - 2 weeks. 2. Receive KVA12123 every 2 weeks alone or in combination with pembrolizumab every 6 weeks. 3. Provide blood samples to evaluate drug levels in blood, drug safety and to explore the effects of each drug on the immune system. 4. Undergo scans every 6 weeks to test the effect of treatment on cancer progression. 5. Undergo other study procedures to evaluate drug safety and participant safety including physical exams, heart function tests, etc.

    at UCLA

  • NKT2152, a HIF2α Inhibitor, in Patients With Advanced Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of the Phase 1 portion is to identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and/or the recommended doses for expansion (RDEs) of NKT2152. The Phase 2 portion will evaluate the efficacy of NKT2152 in ccRCC.

    at UCLA

  • Experimental PET Imaging Scans Before Cancer Surgery to Study the Amount of PET Tracer Accumulated in Normal and Cancer Tissues

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies a new imaging technique called FAPi PET/CT to determine where and to which degree the FAPI tracer (68Ga-FAPi-46) accumulate in normal and cancer tissues in patients with non-prostate cancer. The research team also want to know whether what they see on PET/CT images represents the tumor tissue being excised from the patient's body. The research team is also interested to investigate another new imaging technique called PSMA PET/CT. Participants will be invited to undergo another PET/CT scan, with the PSMA tracer (68Ga-PSMA-11). This is not required but just an option for volunteer patients. Patients who have not received an 18F-FDG PET/CT within one month of enrollment will also undergo an FDG PET/CT scan. The PET/CT scanner combines the PET and the CT scanners into a single device. This device combines the anatomic (body structure) information provided by the CT scan with the metabolic information obtained from the PET scan. PET is an established imaging technique that utilizes small amounts of radioactivity attached to very minimal amounts of, in the case of this research, 68Ga-PSMA-11 and 68Ga-FAPi, and 18F-FDG (if applicable). Because some cancers take up 68Ga-PSMA-11 and/or 68Ga-FAPi it can be seen with PET. CT utilizes x-rays that traverse the body from the outside. CT images provide an exact outline of organs where it occurs in patient's body. FAP stands for Fibroblast Activation Protein. FAP is produced by cells that surround tumors. The function of FAP is not well understood but imaging studies have shown that FAP can be detected with FAPI PET/CT. Imaging FAP with FAPI PET/CT may in the future provide additional information about various cancers. PSMA stands for Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen. This name is incorrect as PSMA is also found in many other cancers. The function of PSMA is not well understood but imaging studies have shown that PSMA can be detected with PET in many non-prostate cancers. Imaging FAP with PET/CT may in the future provide additional information about various cancers.

    at UCLA

  • Hyperpolarized 13C Pyruvate MRI Scan in Predicting Tumor Aggressiveness in Patients With Renal Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This feasibility study will evaluate how well hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan works in predicting tumor aggressiveness in participants with renal tumors. Hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate is a non-radioactive substance with potential usage in the diagnostic imaging of tumors. Hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate MRI may help doctors determine non-invasively whether a kidney tumor is a benign tumor or cancer, and if cancer, how aggressive it is. This may help doctors and participants with renal tumors in the future to make better treatment decisions.

    at UCSF

  • Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity for Cancer Survivors (Tools To Be Fit)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the effect of four different intervention components "tools" on body weight, nutrition, and physical activity in cancer survivors. Studies indicate that people with a history of cancer whose nutrition and physical activity habits are consistent with the American Cancer Society's Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines may have longer disease-free survival. The four different intervention components may help patients with a history of cancer adopt recommended health behaviors after they have completed treatment.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Children and Young Adults With INI1-Negative Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 6 months to 40 years

    This clinical trial is studying two immunotherapy drugs (nivolumab and ipilimumab) given together as a possible treatment for INI1-negative tumors.

    at UCSF

  • Anti-cancer Drug, Cabozantinib, to the Usual Immunotherapy Treatment, Avelumab, in Patients With Metastatic Urothelial Cancer, MAIN-CAV Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial compares the effect of adding cabozantinib to avelumab versus avelumab alone in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread from where it first started (primary site) to other places in the body (metastatic). Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib and avelumab together may further shrink the cancer or prevent it from returning/progressing.

    at UC Davis

  • Collecting Blood Samples From Patients With and Without Cancer to Evaluate Tests for Early Cancer Detection

    open to eligible people ages 40-75

    This study collects blood and tissue samples from patients with cancer and without cancer to evaluate tests for early cancer detection. Collecting and storing samples of blood and tissue from patients with and without cancer to study in the laboratory may help researchers develop tests for the early detection of cancers.

    at UC Davis

  • International REgistry of COnservative or Radical Treatment of Localized Kidney Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Partial nephrectomy (PN) is the standard treatment for localized renal masses and should be preferred in clinical T1 (<7 cm tumor diameter) renal tumors over radical nephrectomy (RN) whenever technically feasible. Nonetheless, indications, approaches, techniques for PN, and correct reporting of outcomes, are still a matter of great debate within the urology community. Concurrently, case-report series suggested that alternative strategies for the treatment of localized renal tumors (ablation techniques (AT), watchful waiting (WW), active surveillance (AS)) could be feasible with acceptable oncologic outcomes in particular settings of patients with localized renal tumors. In this complex clinical scenario, the role surgeon-related and environmental factors (such as surgical experience, hospital resources, countries' social background and performance of health system) are important to address the best personalized approach in patients with renal tumors. In the light of current evidence, many unsolved questions still remain and many unmet needs must be addressed. In particular, 1) the risk-benefit trade-offs between PN and RN for anatomically complex renal localized tumors; 2) the definition of evidence-based strategies to tailor the management strategy (AT vs WW vs AS vs surgery) in different subset of patients with particular clinical conditions (i.e. old, frail, comorbid patients); and 3) the definition of evidence-based recommendations to adapt surgical approach (open vs laparoscopic vs robotic) and resection techniques to different patient-, tumor-, and surgeon-specific characteristics. To meet the challenges, to overcome the limitations of current kidney cancer literature (such as the retrospective study design, potential risk of biases, and heterogeneous follow-up of most series), and to provide high-quality evidence for future development of effective clinical practice Guidelines, we designed the international REgistry of COnservative or Radical treatment of localized kiDney tumors (i-RECORD) Project. The expected impact of the i-RECORD project is to provide robust evidence on the leading clinical and environmental factors driving selection of the management strategy in patients with kidney cancer, and the differential impact of different management strategies (including AS, WW, AT, PN and RN) on functional, perioperative and oncological outcomes, as well as quality of life assessment, at a mid-long term follow-up (5-10 years).

    at UCSD

  • SPECT/CT for the Characterization of Renal Masses

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial studies how well technetium Tc-99m sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) works on clinical decision making in patients with kidney tumors. Diagnostic procedures, such as technetium Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT/CT may be a less invasive way to check for kidney tumors.

    at UCLA

  • Kidney Tumors in Younger Patients

    open to eligible people ages up to 29 years

    This research trial studies kidney tumors in younger patients. Collecting and storing samples of tumor tissue, blood, and urine from patients with cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that occur in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • 9-ING-41 in Patients With Advanced Cancers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    GSK-3β is a potentially important therapeutic target in human malignancies. The Actuate 1801 Phase 1/2 study is designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 9-ING-41, a potent GSK-3β inhibitor, as a single agent and in combination with cytotoxic agents, in patients with refractory cancers.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • Autogene Cevumeran (RO7198457) as a Single Agent and in Combination With Atezolizumab in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1a/1b, open-label, multicenter, global, dose-escalation study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immune response, and pharmacokinetics of autogene cevumeran (RO7198457) as a single agent and in combination with atezolizumab (MPDL3280A, an engineered anti-programmed death-ligand 1 [anti-PD-L1] antibody).

    at UCSF

  • Tazemetostat in Adult Participants With Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will include participants with various types of cancer known as soft-tissue sarcomas. Tissues that can be affected by soft tissue sarcomas include fat, muscle, blood vessels, deep skin tissues, tendons and ligaments. Soft tissue cancers are rare and can occur almost anywhere in the body. Part 1 of this trial will study the safety and the level that adverse effects of the study drug tazemetostat in combination with doxorubicin (current front line treatment) can be tolerated (known as tolerability). It is also designed to establish a recommended study drug dosage for the next part of the study. Part 2 will evaluate and compare how long participants live without their disease getting worse when receiving the study drug plus doxorubicin versus doxorubicin plus placebo (dummy treatment).

    at UCSF

  • APL-101 Study of Subjects With NSCLC With c-Met EXON 14 Skip Mutations and c-Met Dysregulation Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    To assess: - efficacy of APL-101 as monotherapy for the treatment of NSCLC harboring MET Exon 14 skipping mutations, NSCLC harboring MET amplification, solid tumors harboring MET amplification, solid tumors harboring MET fusion, primary CNS tumors harboring MET alterations, solid tumors harboring wild-type MET with overexpression of HGF and MET - efficacy of APL-101 as an add-on therapy to EGFR inhibitor for the treatment of NSCLC harboring EGFR activating mutations and developed acquired resistance with MET amplification and disease progression after documented CR or PR with 1st line EGFR inhibitors (EGFR-I)

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Atezolizumab With or Without Eribulin Mesylate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of atezolizumab with or without eribulin mesylate and how well they work in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has come back (recurrent), spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced), or spread from where it first started (primary site) to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as eribulin mesylate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab and eribulin mesylate may work better at treating urothelial cancer compared to atezolizumab alone.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Surgery in Treating Young Patients With Wilms Tumor

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy and surgery work in treating young patients with Wilms tumor. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Giving combination chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving it after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • S0931, Everolimus in Treating Patients With Kidney Cancer Who Have Undergone Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth or by blocking blood flow to the tumor. PURPOSE: This phase III trial is studying everolimus to see how well it works in treating patients with kidney cancer who have undergone surgery.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Atezolizumab + Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Non-Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research study is studying the combination of Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab as a possible treatment for Advanced Non-Clear Cell Kidney Cancer.

    at UCSD

  • Optimized Management of Nivolumab Based on Response in Patients With Advanced RCC (OMNIVORE Study)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research study is studying two drugs at different time points as a possible treatment for advanced renal cell cancer The drugs involved in this study are: Nivolumab Ipilimumab

    at UCSD

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

  • Testing MK-3475 (Pembrolizumab) After Surgery for Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer and Locally Advanced Urothelial Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with bladder cancer that has spread into the deep muscle of the bladder wall (muscle-invasive) or urothelial cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Monoclonal antibodies recognizing and blocking checkpoint molecules can enhance the patient's immune response and therefore help fight cancer. Pembrolizumab is one of the monoclonal antibodies that block the PD-1 axis and can interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow.

    at UC Davis UCSD

  • Tipifarnib for the Treatment of Advanced Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With HRAS Gene Alterations, a Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II pediatric MATCH trial studies how well tipifarnib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have recurred or spread to other places in the body (advanced), lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders, that have a genetic alteration in the gene HRAS. Tipifarnib may block the growth of cancer cells that have specific genetic changes in a gene called HRAS and may reduce tumor size.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Ablation of Renal Masses Outcomes Registry (ARMOR): Ablation Procedure and Quality of Life Assessment

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to better understand how effective ablation is for destroying tumor cells in the kidney and whether quality of life is improved for patients. Participation in ARMOR may involve retrospective data collection only, combined retrospective and prospective data collection, or prospective data collection

    at UCLA UCSF

Our lead scientists for Kidney Neoplasm research studies include .

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