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Nicotine clinical trials at University of California Health

13 in progress, 10 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Acute Effects of TCIG vs ECIG in PLWH

    open to eligible people ages 21-45

    Randomized controlled trial of acute use of electronic cigarette or tobacco cigarette on parameters of ventricular repolarization and inflammation/oxidative stress.

    at UCLA

  • Cigarette Harm Reduction With Electronic Cigarette Use

    open to eligible people ages 21-70

    This is an observational, crossover study that will be examine use behaviors, chemical exposures, and biological effects of SREC compared to TC use in subjects confined to a research ward setting.

    at UCSF

  • E-cigarettes and Blood Vessel Function

    open to eligible people ages 21-45

    Randomized controlled trial of electronic cigarettes with nicotine, without nicotine, and sham control, on endothelial function and markers of oxidative stress.

    at UCLA

  • E-cigarettes, Nicotine Inhaler, and Blood Vessel Function

    open to eligible people ages 21-45

    Randomized controlled trial of electronic cigarettes with nicotine, without nicotine, nicotine inhaler, and sham-control on endothelial function, oxidative stress and sympathetic nerve activity

    at UCLA

  • Electronic Hookah and Endothelial Cell Function

    open to eligible people ages 21-39

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are a new rapidly growing global epidemic. More recently, electronic (e-) hookahs, have increased in popularity in the United States, with the greatest uptake by young female adults, who endorse marketing claims that these products are safer alternatives to traditional flavored hookah tobacco smoking. Unlike other ENDS such as e-cigarettes, e-hookah bowls are used through traditional water-pipes, allowing the vapor-containing nicotine, propylene glycol, glycerin, and flavorings-to pass through a water-filled basin, potentially altering the vapor, before it is inhaled through the user's mouth. Contributing to e-hookah bowls' popularity is the belief that the flavored smoke is detoxified as it passes through the water-filled basin, rendering e-hookah a safer tobacco alternative. However, an e-hookah bowl delivers flavored nicotine by creating a vapor of fine particles and volatile organic compounds that could induce vascular toxicity. The objective of this project is to investigate the effects of e-hookah bowl inhalation on endothelial function, vascular biomarkers and volatile compounds; and molecular mechanisms underlying e-hookah induced endothelial injury using freshly harvested human endothelial cells with a specific role of nicotine. In a cross-over study design, the investigators will first assess endothelial function measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in 18 young healthy hookah smokers 21-39 years old, before and after two separate 30-minute e-hookah bowl inhalation sessions using one brand of nicotine-containing and nicotine-free e-hookah liquid and, for control comparison, before and after sham hookah smoking. Then, in freshly harvested venous endothelial cells the investigators will assess nitric oxide bioavailability, and expression of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress before and after the sessions. To compare specific exposures across conditions, the research team will measure changes in plasma nicotine, and highly specific urinary mercapturic acid metabolites of acrolein and benzene. This proposed study will provide critical scientific data on the impact of e-hookah inhalation on vascular health and mechanisms of exposure on known cardiac risk factors. Results will provide critical data to the FDA to inform the development of regulations specific to hookah.

    at UCLA

  • Novel Pharmacotherapy Approaches in Smokers With Serious Mental Illness

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    Approximately 60 chronic smokers with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who are motivated to try to quit smoking will be randomized to receive smoking cessation treatment with the FDA-approved medication, varenicline, delivered either a) at its standard dose and titration schedule (half of the participants) versus b) at a lower dose and slower titration schedule (the other half), for 12 weeks. All smokers will choose a target quit date sometime between 8 to 35 days after starting the medication. All participants will receive ten 30-minute sessions of a behavioral treatment called Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Participants will be followed for an additional 12 weeks off study medication. The major endpoint is the feasibility of combining ACT with the different dosing strategies. Investigators will also conduct a blood test that measures the breakdown of nicotine in the body to explore whether that measure influences treatment response and side effects.

    at UCSD

  • Short-Term Cardiovascular Effects of E-Cigarettes: Influence of E-Liquid pH

    open to eligible people ages 21-70

    This study will examine the short-term cardiovascular (CV) effects of e-liquid pH in a randomized, crossover clinical and behavioral pharmacology study of experienced adult e-cigarette users (N=21). The specific aim of the study is to assess the impact of changes in e-liquid pH on nicotine pharmacokinetics, cardiovascular, and subjective effects of e-cigarettes.

    at UCSF

  • Social Media Intervention to Stop Nicotine and Cannabis Vaping Among Adolescents

    open to eligible people ages 13-17

    Social media based intervention to support teens in their efforts to quit vaping.

    at UCSF

  • THC Crossover Study

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    This is a randomized, crossover study enrolling experienced dual cannabis-tobacco smokers (N=18) to describe the differences in THC and toxicant exposure, examining pharmacokinetic, subjective, and cardiovascular effects from smoking and vaping dry herb cannabis. This study will also examine the differences in toxicant exposure and cardiovascular disease risk between smoking cannabis and smoking tobacco cigarettes.

    at UCSF

  • Using Nicotine to Reverse Age-related Auditory Processing Deficits

    open to eligible people ages 18-85

    The present study will evaluate the effects of both aging and nicotine on psychophysical tasks and electrophysiological measures. Nicotine will be administered to study participants in the form of gum that is available as an over-the-counter medication. The hypothesis is that nicotine will reverse the detrimental effects of aging on auditory processing. The proposed experiments will characterize the effects of nicotine and may eventually lead to improved treatments of hearing loss in a variety of patient populations and in healthy aging.

    at UC Irvine

  • Impact of Very Low Nicotine Content Cigarettes in a Complex Marketplace

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This project will examine the impact of very low nicotine content (VLNC) cigarettes in a complex tobacco and nicotine product marketplace. We will compare the number of cigarettes smoked and cigarette-free days in an experimental marketplace that contains VLNC cigarettes versus normal nicotine content (NNC) cigarettes.

    at UCSF

  • New Treatment for Alcohol and Nicotine Dependence

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research study aims to test whether topiramate (a drug that is being used for seizure) will help individuals who have problems with both alcohol and nicotine. The investigators believe that individuals taking topiramate will be more successful at abstaining from both alcohol and nicotine than individuals taking placebo.

    at UCSD

  • Vaping High vs. Low Nicotine E-Liquid

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study will examine the effects of electronic cigarette e-liquid nicotine content in a randomized, crossover clinical and behavioral pharmacology study of experienced adult e-cigarette users (N=36). The specific aim is to determine the impact of nicotine content of e-liquid on nicotine pharmacology, systemic exposure to toxic volatile organic compounds, and short-term cardiovascular effects.

    at UCSF

Our lead scientists for Nicotine research studies include .

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