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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder clinical trials at University of California Health

4 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Arbitration Between Habitual and Goal-directed Behavior in Obsessive-compulsive Disorder: Circuit Dynamics and Effects of Noninvasive Neurostimulation

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    People utilize two behavioral strategies, goal-directed and habitual, when engaging in value-based decision-making that involves rewarding or punishing outcomes. Accumulating evidence suggests an imbalance between habitual and goal-directed behavior in favor of habitual control in parallel with exaggerated tendency toward compulsive/harm avoidance behavior in OCD. In healthy subjects, an arbitration mechanism has been proposed recently that controls the balance between those two strategies of action selection. Arbitration regions regulate the goal-directed/habitual decision-making balance by selectively downregulating the activity of the habitual regions. This project aims to explore the neurobehavioral characteristics of arbitration mechanism and its relationship with behaviors and clinical phenotypes in OCD by applying computational cognitive neuroscience, clinical task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) method.

    at UCLA

  • Cortical Stimulation to Treat Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 22-75

    The purpose of this study is to identify abnormal brain signals associated with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and psychiatric symptoms and to investigate novel therapeutic stimulation sites. While treating OCD with standard deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy, the investigators will also monitor the activity of the anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex, a region known be involved with OCD, decision making, and emotion regulation, and the investigators will identify abnormal activity corresponding to the severity of a patient's OCD. The investigators will also investigate whether it is possible for stimulation delivered to these parts of the brain can improve OCD symptoms. These investigations have the potential to aid in the development of improved forms of DBS that can better target abnormal OCD brain signatures in the future. The investigators will implant a cortical electrode in addition to the ALIC DBS electrode and connect these to an implantable pulse generator that care store field potential data (Medtronic Percept). The decision whether the lead is placed in the prefrontal or cingulate cortex bilaterally will be based upon considerations of the surgical risks for a particular patient based upon their anatomy and the required surgical approach. At multiple time points post-implantation up to 2 years, in our clinic or patient's homes, cortical and subcortical signals will be recorded. Data will be collected while patient are resting or engaged in symptom provocation tasks, emotional/cognitive tasks while cortical stimulation is on and off. In addition to brain signal recordings, symptoms will be assessed using validated questionnaires and tasks to allow identification of neurophysiological correlates of OCD symptoms.

    at UCSF

  • Randomized Controlled Trial of Standard ERP and OC-Go

    open to eligible people ages 9-17

    Phase II of this study will examine the efficacy of the OC-Go application via a randomized controlled trial comparing standard exposure and response prevention (ERP) treatment for pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) to exposure/response prevention (ERP) augmented with OC-Go. A cross-over design will be implemented for these 12 sessions of treatment, in which participants that were randomized to standard ERP will receive OC-Go augmented ERP for the second half of treatment, and vice versa. Efficacy will be investigated in a sample of 32 children with OCD.

    at UCLA

  • BHV-4157 in Adult Subjects With Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of BHV-4157 versus placebo in subjects with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

    at UCSD

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