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Oropharyngeal Cancer clinical trials at University of California Health

24 in progress, 12 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Phase II Study of Cemiplimab and ISA101b in Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic HPV16 Positive OPC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This will be an open-label, phase 2 study in which subjects will receive ISA101b and cemiplimab.

    at UCSF

  • A Randomized Phase 2 Study of Cemiplimab ± ISA101b in HPV16-Positive OPC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This will be a blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, phase 2 study in which subjects will be randomly assigned 1:1 to cemiplimab plus placebo or cemiplimab plus ISA101b.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Chemoradiation vs Immunotherapy and Radiation for Head and Neck Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to compare any good or bad effects of using pembrolizumab (an experimental drug) and radiation therapy (RT), compared to using cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

    at UCSD

  • Comparing High-Dose Cisplatin to Low-Dose Cisplatin Weekly Combined With Radiation for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial compares the effect of the combination of high-dose cisplatin every three weeks and radiation therapy versus low-dose cisplatin weekly and radiation therapy for the treatment of patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. This study is being done to find out if low-dose cisplatin given weekly together with radiation therapy is the same or better than high-dose cisplatin given every 3 weeks together with radiation therapy in treating patients with head and neck cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSD

  • Comparison of Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy Combinations for Treatment of Oral Cancer

    “You are invited to be a part of this study if you have Stage III or IV Oral Cancer.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies how well radiation therapy works when given together with cisplatin, docetaxel, cetuximab, and/or atezolizumab after surgery in treating patients with high-risk stage III-IV head and neck cancer the begins in the thin, flat cells (squamous cell). Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The purpose of this study is to compare the usual treatment (radiation therapy with cisplatin chemotherapy) to using radiation therapy with docetaxel and cetuximab chemotherapy, and using the usual treatment plus an immunotherapy drug, atezolizumab.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD UCSF

  • NT-I7 for the Treatment of Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck Undergoing Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial evaluates the side effects of NT-I7 in treating patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck that has come back (recurrent) who are undergoing surgery. NT-I7 is an immunotherapy drug that works by helping the immune system fight tumor cells. The body produces T-cells which play an important role in body's immune response and its ability to recognize tumor cells. This immunotherapy drug may boost body's T-cells to help fight cancer and enhance body's response to cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Cetuximab in Treating Patients With HPV Positive, KRAS-Variant Stage III-IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy and cisplatin with or without cetuximab works in treating patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) positive, KRAS-variant stage III-IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may help the body?s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving radiation therapy, cisplatin, and cetuximab may work better in treating patients with HPV positive, KRAS-variant oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma compared to radiation therapy and cisplatin alone.

    at UCLA

  • Radiation With Chemotherapy (Cisplatin) or Immunotherapy (Nivolumab) to Treat Oropharyngeal (Throat) Cancer

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies how well a reduced dose of radiation therapy works with nivolumab compared to cisplatin in treating patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancer that is early in its growth and may not have spread to other parts of the body (early-stage), and is not associated with smoking. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial is being done to see if a reduced dose of radiation therapy and nivolumab works as well as standard dose radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Sodium Thiosulfate for Prevention of Ototoxicity in Patients With Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Undergoing Chemoradiation With Cisplatin

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial investigates how well sodium thiosulfate works in preventing ototoxicity (hearing loss/damage) in patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) who are undergoing a chemoradiation. Sodium thiosulfate is a type of medication used to treat cyanide poisoning and to help lessen the side effects from cisplatin. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. The purpose of this trial is to find out whether it is feasible to give sodium thiosulfate 4 hours after each cisplatin infusion along with standard of care radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Giving sodium thiosulfate after cisplatin may help decrease the risk of hearing loss.

    at UCSF

  • Study of PDS0101 and Pembrolizumab Combination I/O in Subjects With HPV16 + Recurrent and/or Metastatic HNSCC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    VERSATILE-002 is a Phase 2, open-label, multicenter study of the efficacy and safety of PDS0101 administered in combination with pembrolizumab in adults with HPV16 and PD-L1 positive recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • De-escalated Radiation for Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a single-arm, observational registry study determining the effects of reduced radiation dose in select patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) positive oropharyngeal cancer.

    at UC Irvine

  • QUantitative Assessment of Swallowing After Radiation (QUASAR)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    To use novel methods for quantitative analysis of VFSS (videofluoroscopic swallow study, also known as modified barium swallow) to study and compare dysphagia in patients treated for head and neck carcinoma with concurrent radiation therapy and chemotherapy (cisplatin) or targeted therapy (cetuximab) vs. immunotherapy (pembrolizumab, nivolumab, or durvalumab). Our hypothesis is that pharyngeal constriction will be greater (lower ratio) with concurrent immunotherapy compared to chemotherapy, as measured by the pharyngeal constriction ratio (PCR).

    at UCSD

  • A Study of Experimental Radiation Therapy With Cisplatin or Cetuximab for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy is more effective with cisplatin or cetuximab in treating oropharyngeal cancer.

    PURPOSE: This phase III trial is studying radiation therapy with cisplatin or cetuximab to see how well it works in treating patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies chemotherapy to see how well it works with or without bevacizumab in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back (recurrent) or that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, cisplatin, carboplatin, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Bevacizumab may also make tumor cells more sensitive to chemotherapy and stop the growth of head and neck cancer by blocking blood flow to the tumor. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective when given with or without bevacizumab in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    at UCSD

  • Pembrolizumab Combined With Cetuximab for Treatment of Recurrent/Metastatic Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a prospective, multi-center, open-label, non-randomized, multi-arm phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy of combination therapy with pembrolizumab and cetuximab for patients with recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. There will be four patient cohorts, including a PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitor-naïve, cetuximab-naïve arm (Cohort 1), a PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitor-refractory, cetuximab-naïve arm (Cohort 2), a PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitor-refractory, cetuximab-refractory arm (Cohort 3), and a cutaneous HNSCC arm (Cohort 4). A total of 83 patients (33 in Cohort 1, 25 in Cohort 2, 15 in Cohort 3, and 10 in Cohort 4) will be eligible to enroll. Patients will be enrolled at 4 sites: UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, UC Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, and University of Washington Siteman Cancer Center.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Pembrolizumab in Combination With CRT for LA-SCCHN

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a single-arm, multi-site, open-label trial of pembrolizumab (MK-3475) used in combination with standard, cisplatin-based, definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with stage III-IVB squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Approximately 39 patients with Stage III-IVB SCCHN will be enrolled to evaluate both the safety and efficacy of this novel combination. Subjects will not be randomized and will all receive the study treatment. Treatment will consist of a loading dose of pembrolizumab 200 mg IV given 7 days prior to initiation of CRT (day-7). CRT with cisplatin 40 mg/m2 IV weekly and head and neck radiation at 70 Gy fractionated at 2 Gy once daily over 35 days, will begin on day 1. CRT will end on approximately day 46-50. Pembrolizumab 200 mg IV will continue following CRT in an adjuvant fashion starting on day 57 for an additional 5 doses, as tolerated, through day 141. Subjects will be evaluated for response following treatment.

    at UCSD

  • Radiation Therapy With Durvalumab or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Who Cannot Take Cisplatin

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II/III trial studies how well radiation therapy works with durvalumab or cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has spread to a local and/or regional area of the body who cannot take cisplatin. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not known if radiation therapy with durvalumab will work better than the usual therapy of radiation therapy with cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Who Have Undergone Surgery

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy with or without cisplatin works in treating patients with stage III-IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who have undergone surgery. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known if radiation therapy is more effective with or without cisplatin in treating patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    at UCSD

  • Reduced-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies the side effects and how well modestly reduced-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with or without cisplatin works in treating patients with oropharyngeal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether IMRT is more effective with or without cisplatin in treating patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD UCSF

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Durvalumab With or Without Tremelimumab Before Surgery in Treating Participants With Human Papillomavirus Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Caner

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase Ib/II trial studies the side effects and how well stereotactic body radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab before surgery work in treating participants with human papillomavirus positive oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a specialized radiation therapy that sends x-rays directly to the tumor using smaller doses over several days and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving stereotactic body radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab before surgery may work better in treating participants with oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer.

    at UCLA

  • Testing Immunotherapy Versus Observation in Patients With HPV Throat Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase III trials studies whether maintenance immunotherapy (nivolumab) following definitive treatment with radiation and chemotherapy (cisplatin) result in significant improvement in overall survival (time being alive) and progression-free survival (time being alive without cancer) for patients with intermediate risk human papillomavirus (HPV) positive oropharynx cancer (throat cancer) that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Drugs used in chemotherapy such as cisplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether chemotherapy and radiation therapy followed by maintenance nivolumab therapy works better than chemotherapy and radiation therapy alone in treating patients with HPV positive oropharyngeal cancer.

    at UCSD

  • Testing the Addition of M3814 (Peposertib) to Radiation Therapy for Patients With Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Who Cannot Take Cisplatin

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects and best dose of peposertib when given together with radiation therapy in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) who cannot take cisplatin. Peposertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. This trial aims to see whether adding peposertib to radiation therapy is safe and works well in treating patients with head and neck cancer.

    at UCSD

  • Testing the Addition of M6620 (VX-970, Berzosertib) to Usual Chemotherapy and Radiation for Head and Neck Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of berzosertib (M6620) when given together with cisplatin and radiation therapy in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). M6620 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving M6620 together with cisplatin and radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    at UC Davis

  • Transoral Surgery Followed By Low-Dose or Standard-Dose Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With HPV Positive Stage III-IVA Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well transoral surgery followed by low-dose or standard-dose radiation therapy works in treating patients with human papilloma virus (HPV) positive stage III-IVA oropharyngeal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving radiation therapy with chemotherapy may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery. It is not yet known how much extra treatment needs to be given after surgery.

    at UCLA UCSF

Our lead scientists for Oropharyngeal Cancer research studies include .

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