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Polycystic Ovary Syndrome clinical trials at UC Health
4 research studies open to new patients

  • Androgen Excess as a Cause for Adipogenic Dysfunction in PCOS Women

    open to eligible females ages 18-35

    The purpose of this research study is to collect specimen samples and study medical information from women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and women without PCOS. The goal is to learn more about the changes that take place in the body that result in PCOS. We anticipate that 32 women will take part in this study (16 without PCOS and 16 with PCOS). All patients will undergo a physical exam, blood tests, and ultrasound of their ovaries. If they meet the criteria for this study, they will then undergo additional blood tests, removal of a small amount of subcutaneous abdominal fat, measurement of regional body fat (i.e., DXA scan) and a modified frequently-sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT). The women without PCOS will complete the study at this point. The women with PCOS will be randomized to receive the drug flutamide 125 mg/day or placebo. They will take the drug every day for six 28-day cycles. They will be asked to collect and store a urine sample once a week. They will also be asked to complete a pill diary and menstrual diary. Once a month while they are taking the flutamide/placebo, they will return to the clinic and bring their frozen urine samples. At that time they will undergo a physical exam, toxicity assessment, and blood draw. Quality of Life assessments will be done at the beginning of the study for all participants. Women with PCOS who are taking the flutamide or placebo will be asked to repeat the Quality of Life assessments during the study and at the end of the study. After the six 28-day cycles are completed they will then undergo additional blood tests, removal of a small amount of subcutaneous abdominal fat, measurement of regional body fat (i.e., DXA scan) and a modified frequently-sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT). Six months following the completion of all study protocol procedures, participants who received flutamide/placebo will be contacted by phone to check on the status of their health. They will be asked if they have experienced any health problems or have become pregnant since they completed the study procedures.

    at UCLA

  • Metformin, Vitamin D, and Depression in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Trial

    open to eligible females ages 18-45

    Open-label randomized clinical trial assessing the efficacy of Metformin versus Vitamin D in improving symptoms of depressed mood in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    at UCSF

  • Ovarian Response to Recombinant Follicle Stimulating Hormone in Women With PCOS

    open to eligible females ages 18-37

    Women with PCOS suffer from anovulation and, as a result, infertility. Efforts to clinically induce ovulation in these women using follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) administered subcutaneously seemingly requires prolonged administration compared to that of ovulatory women without PCOS. The apparent differing ovarian responsiveness to FSH between PCOS and normal women has not been carefully studied. We propose to address this issue by performing a dose-response study and examine ovarian follicle (estrogen, E2) responses to FSH administered subcutaneously in women with PCOS compared to responses observed in normal women.

    at UCSD

  • Paleo Versus Healthy ADA Diets for Treatment of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

    open to eligible females ages 18-40

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a syndrome which includes elevated androgen levels, irregular menstrual cycles and insulin resistance. Standard treatments, which include weight loss and medications to improve insulin secretion are only partly successful, and may require that young women take medications for decades. The study investigators have been evaluating the effects of specific diets on insulin resistance in healthy volunteers and subjects with type 2 diabetes, and have found that subjects with insulin resistance seem to respond particularly well to these diet regimens. Volunteers with PCOS are being asked to participate to see if following these diets can help regularize your menstrual cycles. The results of this study may help improve fertility treatments for women with PCOS.

    at UCSF

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