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Prediabetes clinical trials at UC Health
4 in progress, 2 open to new patients

  • MyLife: A Digital Health Coaching Program

    open to eligible people ages 18-64

    Lifestyle behaviors such as sleep, diet, and physical activity, are implicated in a number of chronic conditions including hypertension, obesity, diabetes, heart failure, and obstructive sleep apnea. Research shows that despite awareness of this fact, patients at risk for lifestyle-related chronic diseases have difficulty adhering to lifestyle change recommendations made by their physicians, and face challenges when attempting to modify unhealthy behaviors. New technologies, such as wearable activity trackers and automated text messaging, are promising tools for monitoring and promoting healthy lifestyle behaviors among patients. This randomized controlled trial will evaluate the effect of a digital health program, which uses pre-medical post-baccalaureate or undergraduate health coaches, wearable activity trackers (Fitbit Charge 2), and mobile messaging, compared to wearable activity trackers (Fitbit Charge 2) alone in promoting lifestyle change among overweight and sedentary 18-64 year old patients recruited from UCLA Health primary care clinics.

    at UCLA

  • Walnuts to Achieve Lasting NUTrition to Prevent Diabetes

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Prediabetes is a precursor of type 2 diabetes and an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and currently affects one-quarter of the population of the United States. Individuals of overweight or obese BMI are at particular high risk for incident diabetes. A major modifiable risk factor for type 2 diabetes is poor dietary quality, and improvement of dietary quality can effectively delay and even prevent type 2 diabetes. Interventions to improve dietary quality thus far, however, rely on short-term intensive clinically designed meals replacing the entire diet which have poor sustainability. Persistent improvements to daily dietary patterns are often difficult without directed guidance, and overall dietary quality in the United States remains poor. The identification of a practical, daily dietary intervention to improve dietary quality and prevent diabetes in those at high risk remains unknown. The investigators propose to enroll 40 individuals with diagnosed prediabetes into a randomized controlled pilot study and provide a daily walnut supplementation intervention to determine feasibility and acceptability of the supplement. The investigators will then determine preliminary efficacy on metabolic markers and will investigate associations between dietary quality and circulating levels of branched-chain amino acids. The goal is to implement a whole-food supplement to improve dietary quality in patients with prediabetes as a tool for future type 2 diabetes prevention.

    at UCSF

  • A Pharmacist-Coordinated Implementation of the Diabetes Prevention Program

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This proposed project will translate evidence-based strategies for diabetes prevention within the framework of an existing and highly utilized pharmacist-led diabetes care program. Our team includes investigators and practitioners with experience in implementing the DPP (Diabetes Prevention Program) as well as in community-based research. This proposal represents an opportunity to rapidly implement an innovative project addressing a critical area of significant unmet need, as the required key health system and community infrastructure are already in place. The intended outcome is the creation of a practical, effective and sustainable approach to increase evidence-based diabetes prevention strategies that can readily be adopted in other systems.

    at UCLA

  • Investigation of Metformin in Pre-Diabetes on Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular OuTcomes

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This research will help us to learn if the medicine called metformin reduces the risk of death, heart attacks, and/or strokes in patients who have pre-diabetes and heart or blood vessel problems.

    at UCLA

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