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Premature Birth clinical trials at University of California Health

23 in progress, 11 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Bevacizumab Treatment For Type 1 ROP

    open to eligible people ages up to 6 months

    Type 1 retinopathy of prematurity in zone I represents the most severe type of ROP and has the worst prognosis. It is unknown whether low-dose bevacizumab will be successful in these severe cases. Also unknown is the timing and extent of peripheral retinal vascularization after low-dose bevacizumab compared with the standard dose. The current study will evaluate whether doses of 0.063 mg and 0.25mg are effective as treatment for type 1 ROP, with ROP and retinal vessels all in zone I.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA UCSF

  • Delayed Cord Clamping With Oxygen In Extremely Low Gestation Infants

    open to all eligible people

    This study is being conducted to compare the incidence of preterm infants (up to 28+6 weeks GA) who achieve a peripheral oxygen saturation of 80 percent by 5 minutes of life (MOL) given mask CPAP/PPV with an FiO2 of 1.0 during DCC for 90 seconds (HI Group) to infants given mask CPAP/PPV with an FiO2 of .30 during DCC for 90 seconds (LO Group).

    at UC Davis

  • Engaging Mothers & Babies; Reimagining Antenatal Care for Everyone (EMBRACE) Study

    open to eligible females

    This is a randomized comparative effectiveness study of two forms of enhanced prenatal care among 2,600 Medi-Cal eligible pregnant women in Fresno, California. The goal is to see whether group prenatal care with wrap around services versus individual prenatal care supplemented by services covered by the California Department of Public Health Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program (CPSP) results in lower rates of preterm birth, less depression and anxiety, and more respectful and greater satisfaction with prenatal care.

    at UCSF

  • Flow and Grow - The Ideal Time to Wean CPAP Off In Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

    open to all eligible people

    Preterm neonates born at less than 30 weeks' gestation are commonly maintained on invasive or non-invasive respiratory support to facilitate gas exchange. While non-invasive respiratory support (NIS) can be gradually reduced over time as the infant grows, most weaning strategies often lead to weaning failure. This failure is evidenced by an increase in significant events such as apneas, desaturations, and/or bradycardias, increased work of breathing, or an inability to oxygenate or ventilate, resulting in escalated respiratory support. Although the optimal approach to weaning NIS remains uncertain, neonatal units that delay Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) weaning until 32-34 weeks corrected gestational age exhibit lower rates of chronic lung disease. Therefore, the investigators aim to compare the duration on respiratory support and oxygen exposure in infants born at less than 30 weeks' gestational age who undergo a structured weaning protocol that includes remaining on CPAP until at least 32-34 weeks corrected gestational age (CGA). The hypothesis posits that preterm infants following a structured weaning protocol, including maintaining CPAP until a specific gestational age, will demonstrate lower rates of weaning failure off CPAP (defined as requiring more support and/or experiencing increased stimulation events 72 hours after CPAP weaning) than those managed according to the medical team's discretion.

    at UCSD

  • IBP-9414 for the Prevention of Necrotizing Enterocolitis - The Connection Study

    open to all eligible people

    IBP-9414 will be evaluated in preterm infants with a birth weight of 500-1500g, compared to placebo with regards to efficacy and safety in the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis.

    at UCLA

  • Metabolic Mechanisms Induced by Enteral DHA and ARA Supplementation in Preterm Infants

    open to all eligible people

    A comprehensive analysis of the impact of exogenous enteral DHA and ARA supplementation on lipid metabolism including the production of downstream derived mediators and how this impacts important biological pathways such as metabolism, inflammation, and organogenic factors.

    at UCLA

  • MARY-JANE Cannabis and Heart Rhythm Trial

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    Despite recreational cannabis now being legal in 23 states, where more than 100 million Americans reside, studies on the actual health effects are limited. This study is a randomized trial, where each participant will be instructed to consume or avoid cannabis on randomly assigned days during a 14-day monitoring period. The goal of this study is to answer the question: "Does cannabis use increase the frequency of 'early' and abnormal heart beats?" During the 14-day period, participants will wear an external heart monitor, a glucose monitor, and a fitness tracker to track heart rhythm, glucose levels, step counts, and sleep health. Participants will use a mobile app or a text messaging service for daily instructions/reminders on cannabis use, and short surveys. The investigators ask that participants smoke or vape cannabis at least once on days they are instructed to consume cannabis. Compelling evidence of heart and other health effects would be important to the clinical care of our patients.

    at UCSF

  • Periviable GOALS Decision Support Tool

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The Periviable GOALS (Getting Optimal Alignment around Life Support) decision support tool (DST) is meant to facilitate informed shared decision-making regarding neonatal resuscitation for families facing the threat of a periviable delivery (deliveries occurring between 22 0/7 - 25 6/7 weeks gestational age). It is designed for parents to review independent of their clinician, and is intended to supplement, not replace, clinician counseling. The focus of the DST is the provision of patient-centered outcomes information and assistance with values clarification regarding neonatal outcomes. This is a multisite, randomized controlled trial to test the effect of the Periviable GOALS DST on shared decision making and decision satisfaction. The investigators hypothesize that participants who utilize the GOALS DST will have improved shared decision making and higher decision satisfaction.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Two Year Developmental Follow-up for PREMOD2 Trial (Premature Infants Receiving Milking or Delayed Cord Clamping)

    open to eligible people ages 22 months to 42 months

    An extension of the PREMOD2 trial, the PREMOD2 Follow-Up trial will evaluate the neurodevelopmental outcomes at 22-26 months corrected age of preterm children who received UCM or DCC. This prospective multi-national randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a two-arm parallel non-inferiority design of two alternative approaches of treatment.

    at UC Irvine UCSD

  • Follow-up Visit of High Risk Infants

    open to eligible people ages 18 months to 26 months

    The NICHD Neonatal Research Network's Follow-Up study is a multi-center cohort in which surviving extremely low birth-weight infants born in participating network centers receive neurodevelopmental, neurosensory and functional assessments at 22-26 months corrected age (Infants born prior to July 1, 2012 were seen at 18-22 months corrected age). Data regarding pregnancy and neonatal outcome are collected prospectively. The goal is to identify potential maternal and neonatal risk factors that may affect infant neurodevelopment.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Heart Rhythm Twins Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Premature atrial contractions (PACs) and premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) are observed in the majority of individuals monitored for more than a few hours. Although the clinical course of PACs and PVCs is usually benign, it has been described that high PAC or PVC frequency causes various comorbidities and worsens outcomes in different patient groups. For example, PACs can initiate episodes of atrial fibrillation, and PAC count is highly specific in predicting diagnosis of incident atrial fibrillation. Increasing PVC frequencies are an important predictor of incident heart failure. While conventional wisdom dictates that common environmental exposures determine PAC and PVC frequencies, this has not born out in rigorous studies. Whether PAC and PVC frequencies may have genetic underpinnings remains unknown. Comparisons between identical twins and fraternal twins can provide estimates of heritability. Fraternal twins are an ideal control because, like identical twins, they share a womb, have the same birthday, and their environment while growing up are as similar as between identical twins. However, while identical twins share approximately 100% of the same inherited DNA, fraternal twins share, on average, about 50%. By monitoring identical and fraternal twins with portable electrocardiograms (ECGs), we will be able to count the PACs and PVCs over a consecutive timespan to describe the familial aggregation of these complexes. This, to our knowledge, would be the first study to compare PAC and PVC frequencies in identical and same-sex fraternal twins, providing the first assessment of how genetical inheritance may influence cardiac ectopy burdens.

    at UCSF

  • Clinical Efficacy and Safety Study of OHB-607 in Preventing Chronic Lung Disease in Extremely Premature Infants

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine if an investigational drug can reduce the burden of chronic lung disease in extremely premature infants, as compared to extremely premature infants receiving standard neonatal care alone.

    at UCLA

  • Early Caffeine and LISA Compared to Caffeine and CPAP in Preterm Infants

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is being conducted to determine whether prophylactic administration of surfactant by the Less Invasive Surfactant Administration (LISA) method reduces the need for mechanical ventilation in the first 72 hours of life when compared to early Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) alone.

    at UC Irvine

  • Hydrocortisone for BPD

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The Hydrocortisone and Extubation study will test the safety and efficacy of a 10 day course of hydrocortisone for infants who are less than 30 weeks estimated gestational age and who are intubated at 14-28 days of life. Infants will be randomized to receive hydrocortisone or placebo. This study will determine if hydrocortisone improves infants'survival without moderate or severe BPD and will be associated with improvement in survival without moderate or severe neurodevelopmental impairment at 22 - 26 months corrected age.

    at UCLA

  • Milk Volume Outcomes Following Oral Nicotinamide Riboside Supplementation in Mothers of Extremely Preterm Infants

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Breastfeeding has well-established immunity and developmental benefits for newborns, yet mothers of preterm infants often struggle to provide sufficient breast milk. The investigators hypothesize that supplementing mothers of preterm infants with nicotinamide riboside (NR) during early postpartum will result in increased milk production. NR is a unique precursor to NAD+, which functions in whole-body metabolism, including that which supports the elevated energy demands of lactation. In lactating rats, NR supplementation improved milk quantity and quality, with metabolic benefits for the mother and lasting protective advantages for the offspring. No studies have been conducted to date that explore the short- or long-term use of NR for increasing milk supply in lactating women. This study will follow a small cohort of women and very preterm infants in the NICU throughout two intervention phases-- one in which each mother will randomly receive either NR or a placebo, then the opposite treatment-- to determine the effect of maternal NR supplementation on expressed milk volume and other markers of metabolism.

    at UC Davis

  • Positive End-Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) Levels During Resuscitation of Preterm Infants at Birth (The POLAR Trial).

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Premature babies often need help immediately after birth to open their lungs to air, start breathing and keep their hearts beating. Opening their lungs can be difficult, and once open the under-developed lungs of premature babies will often collapse again between each breath. To prevent this nearly all premature babies receive some form of mechanical respiratory support to aid breathing. Common to all types of respiratory support is the delivery of a treatment called positive end-expiratory pressure, or PEEP. PEEP gives air, or a mixture of air and oxygen, to the lung between each breath to keep the lungs open and stop them collapsing. Currently, clinicians do not have enough evidence on the right amount, or level, of PEEP to give at birth. As a result, doctors around the world give different amounts (or levels) of PEEP to premature babies at birth. In this study, the Investigators will look at 2 different approaches to PEEP to help premature babies during their first breaths at birth. At the moment, the Investigators do not know if one is better than the other. One is to give the same PEEP level to the lungs. The others is to give a high PEEP level at birth when the lungs are hardest to open and then decrease the PEEP later once the lungs are opened and the baby is breathing. Very premature babies have a risk of long-term lung disease (chronic lung disease). The more breathing support a premature baby needs, the more likely the risk of developing chronic lung disease. The Investigators want to find out whether one method of opening the baby's lungs at birth results in them needing less breathing support. This research has been initiated by a group of doctors from Australia, the Netherlands and the USA, all who look after premature babies.

    at UCSD

  • Prematurity Risk Assessment Combined With Clinical Interventions for Improving Neonatal outcoMEs

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This prospective, randomized, controlled study evaluates the safety and efficacy of a preterm birth (PTB) prevention strategy versus standard of care pregnancy management to reduce the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    at UCSD

  • Milk, Growth and Microbiota Study

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Late preterm infants, who are born at 34, 35 or 36 weeks gestation, often have difficulty feeding, establishing growth, and fighting off infection. Breastfeeding provides improved nutrition to help fight infection, in part because breast milk encourages the growth of healthy bacteria (microbiota) in the infant's intestine. However, when mothers give birth preterm, their breasts are usually not quite ready to make milk; it can take several days to have enough breast milk to match a baby's nutritional needs. If there is not yet enough breast milk, formula is often used. However, formula can interfere with the growth of healthy intestinal bacteria. An alternate nutritional option is donor milk from a certified milk bank, which is available in all neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in San Francisco. However, no scientific studies have yet studied donor milk for late preterm infants, so currently all San Francisco NICUs (as well as the large majority of NICUs nationwide) reserve donor milk for infants born at <34 weeks. This study's investigators therefore propose the "Milk, Growth and Microbiota (MGM) Study," a randomized controlled trial to compare banked donor milk to formula for breastfeeding late preterm infants born in San Francisco. Once enrolled in MGM, infants will be randomly assigned to receive either formula or banked donor milk if they need additional nutrition until their mothers are making enough milk. After enrolling the babies, investigators will weigh them daily to assess their growth. The investigators will also collect infant bowel movements at baseline, 1 week and 1 month to determine whether donor milk vs. formula impacts the type of bacteria in the baby's intestine. If the study's results show that donor milk optimizes growth while helping establish healthy bacteria in the baby's intestine, donor milk might be postnatal strategy to bolster neonatal nutrition for late preterm infants.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • VentFirst: A Multicenter RCT of Assisted Ventilation During Delayed Cord Clamping for Extremely Preterm Infants

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether providing ventilatory assistance prior to umbilical cord clamping influences the occurrence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in extremely preterm (EPT) infants, compared to standard care of providing ventilatory assistance after cord clamping.

    at UC Davis

  • Cohort Study of the Intestinal Microbiota of Premature Infants

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Premature infants are at risk for a variety of diseases, the investigators would like to learn more about why some premature babies are at higher risk and some are protected from these diseases. Scientists at UC Davis and other universities have developed new ways to measure the bacteria and a large number of small molecules in specimens of infant blood, urine, stomach fluid and poop and in mother's milk. These discoveries allow us to consider questions that were impossible to answer before these new techniques were developed. One such question is whether the bacteria in the poop of a premature baby can help us predict the baby's risk for developing infection or a common and serious disease of premature infants called necrotizing enterocolitis. A second question is whether the DNA of a premature baby (obtained from saliva with a q-tip) can predict higher risk for diseases of premature babies.

    at UC Davis

  • Clinical and Genetic Analysis of ROP

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) is a vascular disease affecting the retinas (back of the eye) of low birth weight infants. Although it can be treated effectively if diagnosed early, it continues to be a leading cause of childhood blindness in the United States and throughout the world. The investigators feel that this study will result in specific knowledge discovery about ROP, as well as general knowledge about how image-based data and genetic data can be combined to better understand clinical disease. Participants will be recruited from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at OHSU, along with 4 collaborating institutions (William Beaumont Hospital, Stanford University, University of Illinois Chicago and University of Utah). Hospitalized infants who receive ROP screening examinations for routine care will be eligible for this study, and will be offered the opportunity to participate. Subjects who provide informed consent will have clinical data from routine care collected along with demographic characteristics, results from routine ROP screening examinations, presence of systemic disease or risk factors. Retinal photographs will be taken during these routine eye exams, using a commercially-available camera that has been FDA-cleared for taking pictures from retinas of premature infants. These retinal pictures do not contain any identifiable patient information, and are taken as routine standard of care. The long-term goal of this research is to establish a quantitative framework for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) care based on clinical, imaging, genetic, and informatics principles. The investigators have previously recruited and rigorously phenotyped and genotyped a large study cohort, including implementation of a novel reference standard diagnosis; and built a world-class research consortium for image, genetic, and bioinformatics analysis.

    at UCLA

  • Microbiome, Atopic Disease, Prematurity

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    There is increasing recognition that the microbiome may be important in the development of allergic disease. Asthma is the most prevalent pediatric chronic disease and affects more than 300 million people worldwide. For unclear reasons, those infants born at 34 weeks and earlier are three times as likely to develop asthma. Factors such as formula feeding, C-section delivery and antibiotic exposure may play a role. Recent evidence has identified a "critical window" in early life where gut and breast milk microbial changes are most influential. The investigators propose a novel study to follow a cohort of premature babies in the NICU and after discharge home. The investigators aim to examine whether various exposures of babies in the NICU impact their milk and gut microbiome and lead to asthma and allergies. Our specific aims are: 1. To assess if there is a specific pattern of gut and/or breast milk microbiome over time that is affected by the type of nutrition a baby receives (donor vs maternal vs formula) or other exposures such as antibiotics. 2. Assess whether there are patterns in the microbiome associated with the development of allergic sensitization patterns. 3. Determine if early patterns of the microbiome and allergic sensitization predict allergic conditions (food allergies, allergic rhinitis, eczema, asthma) by 2 years of age. The investigators will recruit approximately 50 subjects born at 34 weeks of gestation or earlier from two local level III NICU. These subjects will be followed over their NICU course with weekly stool, milk feed, and oral saliva collection as well as documentation of relevant events including prenatal history, delivery history, nutrition and breast feeding history and antibiotic courses. Further samples will be collected after discharge at research visits that will take place Rady Children's Hospital until 4-6 years of age. At these visits, standardized allergy questionnaires and a blood allergy panel will be obtained. Together this data will provide a unique opportunity to identify potential shifts in the microbiome associated with nutrition, asthma and allergy in preterm infants. Ultimately, the investigators may be able to discover ways to prevent the development of asthma and allergies during this early window of opportunity.

    at UCSD

  • MIRACLE of LIFE Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The goal of this observational study is to develop and validate cell-free RNA-based biomarkers for predicting a variety of adverse pregnancy outcomes in a pregnant person population. The main question it aims to answer are: 1. Can cell-free RNA-based biomarkers predict which pregnant people are at greatest risk of developing adverse pregnancy outcomes (e.g., preterm birth, preeclampsia)? 2. What is the performance of such biomarkers when predicting an adverse pregnancy outcome (e.g., sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, TPR)?

    at UCSD

Our lead scientists for Premature Birth research studies include .

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