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Rectal Cancer clinical trials at UC Health
12 in progress, 8 open to new patients

  • Experimental Medicine (Transuzumab and Pertuzunab) in Advanced Colorectal Cancer with Genetic Component

    “Help us examine how well experimental drugs work compared to standard-use drugs in treating colorectal cancer.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2/neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Multicenter Phase II Study of Transanal TME (taTME)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Radical rectal cancer resection, namely total mesorectal excision (TME), is the cornerstone of the treatment of resectable rectal cancer. In combination with chemotherapy and radiation treatment (CRT), complete TME with negative resection margins is associated with sustained local and systemic control even in locally advanced disease. Over the last 2 decades, laparoscopic and robotic techniques have been increasingly adopted due to reduced surgical trauma and faster patient recovery. Yet, both approaches are associated with equivalent postoperative morbidity and disturbances in sexual, urinary and defecatory function relative to open TME. Furthermore, laparoscopic and robotic TME remain associated with substantial conversion rates and variable rates of TME completeness as a result of the procedural difficulties reaching the low rectum from the abdominal approach. Transanal TME (taTME) with laparoscopic assistance was developed to facilitate completion of TME using a primary transanal endoscopic approach. Transanal TME uses a "bottom-up approach" to overcome the technical difficulties of low pelvic dissection using an abdominal approach. Published results from single-center taTME series and an international registry suggest the short-term procedural and oncologic safety of this approach in resectable rectal cancer. No multicenter phase II study has yet been conducted to validate the procedural safety, functional outcomes or long-term oncologic outcomes of this approach. Study Design: This is a 5-year phase II multicenter single-arm study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low anterior resection (LAR) with taTME using laparoscopic or robotic assistance in 100 eligible subjects with resectable rectal cancer. Hypothesis: taTME is non-inferior to standard LAR with respect to the quality of the TME achieved.

    at UC Irvine

  • PROSPECT: Chemotherapy Alone or Chemotherapy Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer involves chemotherapy and radiation, known as 5FUCMT, (the chemotherapy drugs 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine and radiation therapy) prior to surgery. Although radiation therapy to the pelvis has been a standard and important part of treatment for rectal cancer and has been shown to decrease the risk of the cancer coming back in the same area in the pelvis, some patients experience undesirable side effects from the radiation and there have been important advances in chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation which may be of benefit. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, both good and bad, of the standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation to chemotherapy using a combination regimen known as FOLFOX, (the drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and leucovorin) and selective use of the standard treatment, depending on response to the FOLFOX. The drugs in the FOLFOX regimen are all FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved and have been used routinely to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UC Davis UCSF

  • Self-monitoring and Reminder Texts to Increase Physical Activity After Cancer II

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    There is a critical need for physical activity interventions in CRC. The investigators have developed a digital health physical activity intervention, Smart Pace, which includes a wearable tracker (Fitbit) and text messaging and aims to have patients build up to 150 min/wk of moderate activity. In this study, the investigators propose to expand and improve Smart Pace, including: 1) enrolling patients during chemotherapy; 2) tailoring text messages to individual preferences and treatment timing; and 3) adding resources to support home-based exercise. The study is a 12-week pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the feasibility of this novel digital health physical activity intervention among 48 CRC patients on chemotherapy. The specific aims are to: 1) Determine the feasibility of the intervention via adherence and attrition, and determine the acceptability of the intervention via questionnaires and semi-structured interviews . 2) Estimate the effect of the intervention vs. usual care on physical activity, QOL, and symptoms at 12-weeks . And 3) Explore the impact of the intervention vs. usual care on fitness, weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure at 12-weeks.

    at UCSF

  • Survivor Choices for Eating and Drinking - Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Epidemiologic data suggest that a Western dietary pattern after diagnosis of colorectal cancer increases risk of disease recurrence and death. High intake of red and processed meat, dairy, refined grains, and sweets/desserts characterize a 'Western dietary pattern'. This study aims to translate the epidemiologic findings into a patient-centered, web-based dietary intervention with text messaging to inform and modify users' dietary choices. The investigators' specific aims are to: 1) Develop a web-based dietary intervention with text messaging for colorectal cancer survivors; and 2) Conduct a 12-week pilot randomized controlled trial to determine the acceptability and feasibility of the dietary intervention among 50 colorectal cancer survivors. All participants will receive standard of care print materials regarding diet following a colorectal cancer diagnosis. Participants in the intervention group will also receive access to a web-based dietary intervention with text messaging for 12 weeks. This study will generate preliminary data on the effect of the intervention on dietary choices among colorectal cancer survivors for future studies.

    at UCSF

  • Targeted chemotherapy, (Veliparib) and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patient With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    “Does giving veliparib with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy kill more tumor cells?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well veliparib or pembrolizumab work with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as modified (m)FOLFOX6 regimen, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving veliparib or pembrolizumab with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells, make the tumor smaller, and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.

    at UCSD UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UC Davis

  • Tas-102 and Radioembolization With 90Y Resin Microspheres for Chemo-refractory Colorectal Liver Metastases

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase I dose escalation study (3+3 design) with a dose expansion arm (12 patients) designed to evaluate safety of the combination of Tas-102 and radioembolization using Yttrium-90 (90Y) resin microspheres for patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver-dominant chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

    at UCSF

  • Dose Finding Study of Once or Twice Weekly IMMU-130 in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase I/II, open-label study of IMMU-130 administered in 21-day treatment cycles, once or twice weekly for 2 consecutive weeks followed by one week of rest to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have been previously treated with at least one prior irinotecan-containing regimen. The study is being done to evaluate whether the study drug is safe and tolerable at different dose levels with these dosing schedules and to obtain preliminary information on its efficacy.

    at UCLA

  • Evaluation of Rectal Cancer Treatment Response Using PET/MRI

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators will be using the combination of FDG-PET and multiparametric MRI in pre- and post-adjuvant chemoradiation therapy in order to attempt to predict pathologic response on surgical resection.

    at UCSF

  • Irinotecan and Alisertib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of alisertib when given together with irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with advanced solid tumors or colorectal cancer. Irinotecan hydrochloride and alisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis

  • Trial Evaluating 3-year Disease Free Survival in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Plus Induction or Consolidation Chemotherapy and Total Mesorectal Excision or Non-operative Management

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The study is designed to test the hypothesis that patients with Locally advanced rectal cancer ( LARC) treated with Total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) and Total mesorectal excision (TME) or Non-operative management (NOM) will have an improved 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to patients with similar tumors treated with Chemoradiation therapy (CRT), Total mesorectal excision (TME) and Adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT).

    at UCSF UC Irvine

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