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Rectal Cancer clinical trials at University of California Health

23 in progress, 11 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • COM701 (an Inhibitor of PVRIG) in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors.

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1 open label sequential dose escalation and cohort expansion study evaluating the safety, tolerability and preliminary clinical activity of COM701 as monotherapy and in combination with nivolumab.

    at UCLA

  • Evaluation of SINGLE PORT (SP) Robotic Technology in Colorectal Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Currently a multiport robotic surgery platform (Intuitive Xi) is widely available and used for colorectal surgery indications. A Single port platform (Intuitive SP) is FDA approved for Head and Neck and Urology but has not been widely used in colorectal surgery. This study seeks to evaluate the safe and effective use of the SP platform for colorectal surgery indications.

    at UCSF

  • Genetic Testing in Screening Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Colon or Rectal Cancer for a COLOMATE Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial screens patients with colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) for genetic mutations for recommendation to a molecularly assigned therapy. Identifying gene mutations may help patients enroll onto target companion trials that target these mutations.

    at UCSD

  • Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity for Colorectal Cancer Survivors (Tools To Be Fit)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the effect of four different intervention components "tools" on body weight, nutrition, and physical activity in colorectal cancer survivors. Studies indicate that people with colorectal cancer whose nutrition and physical activity habits are consistent with the American Cancer Society's Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines may have longer disease-free survival. The four different intervention components may help patients with colon or rectal cancer adopt recommended health behaviors after they have completed treatment.

    at UCSF

  • Multicenter Phase II Study of Transanal TME (taTME)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Radical rectal cancer resection, namely total mesorectal excision (TME), is the cornerstone of the treatment of resectable rectal cancer. In combination with chemotherapy and radiation treatment (CRT), complete TME with negative resection margins is associated with sustained local and systemic control even in locally advanced disease. Over the last 2 decades, laparoscopic and robotic techniques have been increasingly adopted due to reduced surgical trauma and faster patient recovery. Yet, both approaches are associated with equivalent postoperative morbidity and disturbances in sexual, urinary and defecatory function relative to open TME. Furthermore, laparoscopic and robotic TME remain associated with substantial conversion rates and variable rates of TME completeness as a result of the procedural difficulties reaching the low rectum from the abdominal approach. Transanal TME (taTME) with laparoscopic assistance was developed to facilitate completion of TME using a primary transanal endoscopic approach. Transanal TME uses a "bottom-up approach" to overcome the technical difficulties of low pelvic dissection using an abdominal approach. Published results from single-center taTME series and an international registry suggest the short-term procedural and oncologic safety of this approach in resectable rectal cancer. No multicenter phase II study has yet been conducted to validate the procedural safety, functional outcomes or long-term oncologic outcomes of this approach. Study Design: This is a 5-year phase II multicenter single-arm study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low anterior resection (LAR) with taTME using laparoscopic or robotic assistance in 100 eligible subjects with resectable rectal cancer. Hypothesis: taTME is non-inferior to standard LAR with respect to the quality of the TME achieved.

    at UC Irvine

  • Panitumumab, Regorafenib, or TAS-102, in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Unresectable RAS Wild-Type Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well retreatment with panitumumab works compared to standard of care regorafenib or trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (TAS-102) in treating patients with colorectal cancer that is negative for RAS wild-type colorectal cancer has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), and/or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), and is negative for resistance mutations in blood. Treatment with panitumumab may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Some tumors need growth factors to keep growing. Growth factor antagonists, such as regorafenib, may interfere with the growth factor and stop the tumor from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as TAS-102, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer than with the usual treatment of regorafenib or TAS-102.

    at UCSD

  • Prevention of Colorectal Cancer Through Multiomics Blood Testing

    open to eligible people ages 45-85

    The PREEMPT CRC study is a prospective multi-center observational study to validate a blood-based test for the early detection of colorectal cancer by collecting blood samples from average-risk participants who will undergo a routine screening colonoscopy.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • S0820, Adenoma and Second Primary Prevention Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The investigators hypothesize that the combination of eflornithine and sulindac will be effective in reducing a three-year event rate of adenomas and second primary colorectal cancers in patients previously treated for Stages 0 through III colon or rectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSD

  • Short Course Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial investigates how well short-course radiation therapy followed by combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with stage II-III rectal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as leucovorin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving short-course radiation therapy and combination chemotherapy may reduce the need for surgery and therefore improve quality of life.

    at UCLA

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

  • Testing Nivolumab and Ipilimumab With Short-Course Radiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial investigates the effect of nivolumab and ipilimumab when given together with short-course radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving nivolumab, ipilimumab, and radiation therapy may kill more cancer cells.

    at UC Irvine

  • Encorafenib, Binimetinib, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Microsatellite Stable BRAF V600E Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and how well encorafenib, binimetinib, and nivolumab work in treating patients with microsatellite stable, BRAFV600E gene-mutated colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Encorafenib and binimetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving encorafenib, binimetinib, and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer compared to standard treatments.

    at UCSF

  • Epacadostat (INCB024360) Added to Preoperative Chemoradiation in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate epacadostat when given with routine radiation therapy and chemotherapy (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) to treat rectal cancer before routine surgery is performed to remove the tumor.

    at UC Irvine

  • Monitoring Treatment Response With On-board DWI During Neo-adjuvant Chemo-radiation for Rectal Cancer Using Magnetic Resonance-guided-radiotherapy Systems

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    feasibility of using a diffusion sequence of a MRgRT system as an early marker of treatment response during nRCT of rectal adenocarcinoma.

    at UCLA

  • NEO: Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Excision and Observation for Early Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to find out the effects of chemotherapy followed by less invasive surgery on patients and their early rectal cancer. The approach of this trial will be considered a success if at least 65% of participants are able to keep the rectum.

    at UC Irvine

  • PROSPECT: Chemotherapy Alone or Chemotherapy Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer involves chemotherapy and radiation, known as 5FUCMT, (the chemotherapy drugs 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine and radiation therapy) prior to surgery. Although radiation therapy to the pelvis has been a standard and important part of treatment for rectal cancer and has been shown to decrease the risk of the cancer coming back in the same area in the pelvis, some patients experience undesirable side effects from the radiation and there have been important advances in chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation which may be of benefit. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, both good and bad, of the standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation to chemotherapy using a combination regimen known as FOLFOX, (the drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and leucovorin) and selective use of the standard treatment, depending on response to the FOLFOX. The drugs in the FOLFOX regimen are all FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved and have been used routinely to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil With or Without Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Fluorouracil may also make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. Leucovorin calcium may protect normal cells from the side effects of chemotherapy, and it may help fluorouracil work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drug. Giving radiation therapy together with chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.

    PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying how well giving radiation therapy together with fluorouracil with or without combination therapy works in treating patients who are undergoing surgery for stage II or stage III rectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • S1613, Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab or Cetuximab and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2/Neu Amplified Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2/neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Savolitinib in Treating Patients With MET Amplified Metastatic or Unresectable Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well savolitinib works in treating patients with MET amplified colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Savolitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis

  • Tas-102 and Radioembolization With 90Y Resin Microspheres for Chemo-refractory Colorectal Liver Metastases

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a phase I dose escalation study (3+3 design) with a dose expansion arm (12 patients) designed to evaluate safety of the combination of Tas-102 and radioembolization using Yttrium-90 (90Y) resin microspheres for patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver-dominant chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

    at UCSF

  • Testing Diet Intervention Versus Non-Diet Intervention for Management of Bowel Symptoms in Rectal Cancer Survivors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how a diet intervention works in improving bowel dysfunction symptoms related in colon or rectal cancer survivors. Changing a diet may be helpful in reducing the severity of bowel symptoms, including diarrhea and constipation, and improve quality of life in colon or rectal cancer survivors and help doctors learn how to help patients better in the future.

    at UC Irvine

  • Trial Evaluating 3-year Disease Free Survival in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Plus Induction or Consolidation Chemotherapy and Total Mesorectal Excision or Non-operative Management

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The study is designed to test the hypothesis that patients with Locally advanced rectal cancer ( LARC) treated with Total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) and Total mesorectal excision (TME) or Non-operative management (NOM) will have an improved 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to patients with similar tumors treated with Chemoradiation therapy (CRT), Total mesorectal excision (TME) and Adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT).

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • Veliparib, Pembrolizumab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patient With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well veliparib or pembrolizumab work with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as modified (m)FOLFOX6 regimen, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving veliparib or pembrolizumab with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells, make the tumor smaller, and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

Our lead scientists for Rectal Cancer research studies include .

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