Skip to main content

Rectal Cancer clinical trials at University of California Health

25 in progress, 10 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • KVA12123 Treatment Alone and in Combination With Pembrolizumab In Advanced Solid Tumors (VISTA-101)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this clinical trial is to test the safety and efficacy of KVA12123 alone or combined with pembrolizumab in patients with advanced solid tumors. The main questions this study aims to answer are: 1. What is the safety of KVA12123 when administered alone and in combination with pembrolizumab to advanced cancer patients? 2. What is an appropriate dose of KVA12123 to administer alone and in combination with pembrolizumab to advanced cancer patients in future clinical trials? Participants in this trial will be asked to: 1. Visit the clinical site every 1 - 2 weeks. 2. Receive KVA12123 every 2 weeks alone or in combination with pembrolizumab every 6 weeks. 3. Provide blood samples to evaluate drug levels in blood, drug safety and to explore the effects of each drug on the immune system. 4. Undergo scans every 6 weeks to test the effect of treatment on cancer progression. 5. Undergo other study procedures to evaluate drug safety and participant safety including physical exams, heart function tests, etc.

    at UCLA

  • A2B694, a Logic-gated CAR T, in Subjects With Solid Tumors That Express MSLN and Have Lost HLA-A*02 Expression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this study is to test A2B694, an autologous logic-gated Tmod™ CAR T-cell product in subjects with solid tumors including colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic cancer (PANC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), ovarian cancer (OVCA), mesothelioma (MESO), and other solid tumors that express MSLN and have lost HLA-A*02 expression. The main questions this study aims to answer are: Phase 1: What is the recommended dose of A2B694 that is safe for patients Phase 2: Does the recommended dose of A2B694 kill the solid tumor cells and protect the patient's healthy cells Participants will be required to perform study procedures and assessments, and will also receive the following study treatments: Enrollment and Apheresis in BASECAMP-1 (NCT04981119) Preconditioning Lymphodepletion (PCLD) Regimen A2B694 Tmod CAR T cells at the assigned dose

    at UCLA UCSD

  • SINGLE PORT (SP) Robotic Technology in Colorectal Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Currently a multiport robotic surgery platform (Intuitive Xi) is widely available and used for colorectal surgery indications. A Single port platform (Intuitive SP) is FDA approved for Head and Neck and Urology but has not been widely used in colorectal surgery. This study seeks to evaluate the safe and effective use of the SP platform for colorectal surgery indications.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity for Cancer Survivors (Tools To Be Fit)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the effect of four different intervention components "tools" on body weight, nutrition, and physical activity in cancer survivors. Studies indicate that people with a history of cancer whose nutrition and physical activity habits are consistent with the American Cancer Society's Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines may have longer disease-free survival. The four different intervention components may help patients with a history of cancer adopt recommended health behaviors after they have completed treatment.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Optimization of Adaptive Text Messages for Cancer Survivors (OATS II)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial evaluates whether an adaptive text-message intervention is useful in helping survivors of colorectal cancers (CRC) eat more whole grain foods and less refined grain foods. Most CRC survivors don't achieve the recommended intakes of whole grains or fiber, even though there is strong evidence that a high-fiber diet rich in whole grains lowers the risk of death from CRC. Dietary interventions are a promising approach for reducing death from CRC, and text message interventions specifically are a promising tool for reaching diverse populations. This trial evaluates a text-message based dietary intervention that continuously adapts message content to be specifically tailored for the participant for increasing whole grain consumption.

    at UCSF

  • DKN-01 in Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 2 randomized, open-label, two-part, multicenter study with a safety run-in to evaluate efficacy and safety of DKN-01 plus FOLFIRI/FOLFOX and bevacizumab versus standard of care (SOC) [FOLFIRI/FOLFOX and bevacizumab] as second-line treatment of advanced CRC patients.

    at UCLA

  • Short Course Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial investigates how well short-course radiation therapy followed by combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with stage II-III rectal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as leucovorin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving short-course radiation therapy and combination chemotherapy may reduce the need for surgery and therefore improve quality of life.

    at UCLA

  • Anti-Cancer Drug, Irinotecan, to the Standard Chemotherapy Treatment (FOLFOX) After Long-Course Radiation Therapy for Advanced-Stage Rectal Cancers to Improve the Rate of Complete Response and Long-Term Rates of Organ Preservation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial compares the effect of irinotecan versus oxaliplatin after long-course chemoradiation in patients with stage II-III rectal cancer. Combination chemotherapy drugs, such as FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, irinotecan, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin), FOLFOX (leucovorin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan ), and CAPOX (capecitabin and oxaliplatin) work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. FOLFOX or CAPOX are used after chemoradiation as usual treatment for rectal cancer. Giving FOLFIRINOX after chemoradiation may increase the response rate and lead to higher rates of clinical complete response (with a chance of avoiding surgery) compared to FOLFOX or CAPOX after chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Nivolumab to Standard Treatment for Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Colorectal Cancer That Have a BRAF Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial tests whether adding nivolumab to the usual treatment (encorafenib and cetuximab) works better than the usual treatment alone to shrink tumors in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and whose tumor has a mutation in a gene called BRAF. Encorafenib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It is used in patients whose cancer has a certain mutation (change) in the BRAF gene. It works by blocking the action of mutated BRAF that signals cancer cells to multiply. This helps to stop or slow the spread of cancer cells. Cetuximab is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It binds to a protein called EGFR, which is found on some types of cancer cells. This may help keep cancer cells from growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nivolumab in combination with encorafenib and cetuximab may be more effective than encorafenib and cetuximab alone at stopping tumor growth and spreading in patients with metastatic or unresectable BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine

  • Therapy Adapted for High Risk and Low Risk HIV-Associated Anal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of chemotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treating patients with low-risk HIV-associated anal cancer, and nivolumab after standard of care chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with high-risk HIV-associated anal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as mitomycin, fluorouracil, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nivolumab after standard of care chemotherapy and radiation therapy may help reduce the risk of the tumor coming back.

    at UCSF

  • COM701 (an Inhibitor of PVRIG) in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors.

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1 open label sequential dose escalation and cohort expansion study evaluating the safety, tolerability and preliminary clinical activity of COM701 as monotherapy and in combination with nivolumab.

    at UCLA

  • Epacadostat (INCB024360) Added to Preoperative Chemoradiation in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate epacadostat when given with routine radiation therapy and chemotherapy (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) to treat rectal cancer before routine surgery is performed to remove the tumor. The Phase II portion of the trial has not started recruiting.

    at UC Irvine

  • Transanal TME (taTME)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Radical rectal cancer resection, namely total mesorectal excision (TME), is the cornerstone of the treatment of resectable rectal cancer. In combination with chemotherapy and radiation treatment (CRT), complete TME with negative resection margins is associated with sustained local and systemic control even in locally advanced disease. Over the last 2 decades, laparoscopic and robotic techniques have been increasingly adopted due to reduced surgical trauma and faster patient recovery. Yet, both approaches are associated with equivalent postoperative morbidity and disturbances in sexual, urinary and defecatory function relative to open TME. Furthermore, laparoscopic and robotic TME remain associated with substantial conversion rates and variable rates of TME completeness as a result of the procedural difficulties reaching the low rectum from the abdominal approach. Transanal TME (taTME) with laparoscopic assistance was developed to facilitate completion of TME using a primary transanal endoscopic approach. Transanal TME uses a "bottom-up approach" to overcome the technical difficulties of low pelvic dissection using an abdominal approach. Published results from single-center taTME series and an international registry suggest the short-term procedural and oncologic safety of this approach in resectable rectal cancer. No multicenter phase II study has yet been conducted to validate the procedural safety, functional outcomes or long-term oncologic outcomes of this approach. Study Design: This is a 5-year phase II multicenter single-arm study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low anterior resection (LAR) with taTME using laparoscopic or robotic assistance in 100 eligible subjects with resectable rectal cancer. Hypothesis: taTME is non-inferior to standard LAR with respect to the quality of the TME achieved.

    at UC Irvine

  • Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Excision And Observation vs Chemoradiotherapy For Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study is being done to answer the following questions: Is the chance of rectal cancer responding the same if chemotherapy alone is given before limited surgery compared to chemotherapy and radiation therapy given together before limited surgery? If radiation therapy is not given, is quality of life better?

    at UC Irvine

  • Panitumumab, Regorafenib, or TAS-102, in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Unresectable RAS Wild-Type Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well retreatment with panitumumab works compared to standard of care regorafenib or trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (TAS-102) in treating patients with colorectal cancer that is negative for RAS wild-type colorectal cancer has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), and/or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), and is negative for resistance mutations in blood. Treatment with panitumumab may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Some tumors need growth factors to keep growing. Growth factor antagonists, such as regorafenib, may interfere with the growth factor and stop the tumor from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as TAS-102, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer than with the usual treatment of regorafenib or TAS-102.

    at UCSD

  • PROSPECT: Chemotherapy Alone or Chemotherapy Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer involves chemotherapy and radiation, known as 5FUCMT, (the chemotherapy drugs 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine and radiation therapy) prior to surgery. Although radiation therapy to the pelvis has been a standard and important part of treatment for rectal cancer and has been shown to decrease the risk of the cancer coming back in the same area in the pelvis, some patients experience undesirable side effects from the radiation and there have been important advances in chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation which may be of benefit. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, both good and bad, of the standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation to chemotherapy using a combination regimen known as FOLFOX, (the drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and leucovorin) and selective use of the standard treatment, depending on response to the FOLFOX. The drugs in the FOLFOX regimen are all FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved and have been used routinely to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil With or Without Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Fluorouracil may also make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. Leucovorin calcium may protect normal cells from the side effects of chemotherapy, and it may help fluorouracil work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drug. Giving radiation therapy together with chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying how well giving radiation therapy together with fluorouracil with or without combination therapy works in treating patients who are undergoing surgery for stage II or stage III rectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • S0820, Adenoma and Second Primary Prevention Trial

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators hypothesize that the combination of eflornithine and sulindac will be effective in reducing a three-year event rate of adenomas and second primary colorectal cancers in patients previously treated for Stages 0 through III colon or rectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSD

  • S1613, Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab or Cetuximab and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2/Neu Amplified Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2/neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II MATCH screening and multi-sub-trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myelomas that may have spread from where it first started to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced) and does not respond to treatment (refractory). Patients must have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

  • Testing Nivolumab and Ipilimumab With Short-Course Radiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase II trial investigates the effect of nivolumab and ipilimumab when given together with short-course radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving nivolumab, ipilimumab, and radiation therapy may kill more cancer cells.

    at UC Irvine

  • Evaluating 3-year Disease Free Survival in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Plus Induction or Consolidation Chemotherapy and Total Mesorectal Excision or Non-operative Management

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The study is designed to test the hypothesis that patients with Locally advanced rectal cancer ( LARC) treated with Total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) and Total mesorectal excision (TME) or Non-operative management (NOM) will have an improved 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to patients with similar tumors treated with Chemoradiation therapy (CRT), Total mesorectal excision (TME) and Adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT).

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • Tucatinib Combined With Trastuzumab and TAS-102 for the Treatment of HER2 Positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Molecularly Selected Patients, 3T Study

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This phase II trial studies whether tucatinib combined with trastuzumab and TAS-102 works to shrink tumors in patients with HER2 positive colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) and has one of the following gene mutations detected in blood: PIK3CA, KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF V600. Tucatinib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of the abnormal protein that signals tumor cells to multiply. This helps stop or slow the spread of tumor cells. Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. TAS-102 is a combination of 2 drugs; trifluridine and tipiracil. Trifluridine is in a class of medications called thymidine-based nucleoside analogues. It works by stopping the growth of tumor cells. Tipiracil is in a class of medications called thymidine phosphorylase inhibitors. It works by slowing the breakdown of trifluridine by the body. Giving tucatinib, trastuzumab, and TAS-102 together may work better than usual treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    at UCSD

  • Monitoring Treatment Response With On-board DWI During Neo-adjuvant Chemo-radiation for Rectal Cancer Using Magnetic Resonance-guided-radiotherapy Systems

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    feasibility of using a diffusion sequence of a MRgRT system as an early marker of treatment response during nRCT of rectal adenocarcinoma.

    at UCLA

  • Prevention of Colorectal Cancer Through Multiomics Blood Testing

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The PREEMPT CRC study is a prospective multi-center observational study to validate a blood-based test for the early detection of colorectal cancer by collecting blood samples from average-risk participants who will undergo a routine screening colonoscopy.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

Our lead scientists for Rectal Cancer research studies include .

Last updated: