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Respiratory Distress Syndrome clinical trials at UC Health

4 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Mesenchymal Stromal Cells For Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 2b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center study to assess the safety and efficacy of a single dose of Allogeneic Bone Marrow-derived Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (hMSCs) infusion in patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). This study is the extension of the Phase 1 pilot study (NCT01775774) and Phase 2a study (NCT02097641).

    at UCSF

  • The PROSpect Study: A Pediatric Study to Test the Best Breathing Position for Children When They Are Sick

    open to eligible people ages up to 18 years

    Severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS) is a life-threatening and frequent problem experienced by thousands of children each year. Little evidence supports current supportive practices during their critical illness. The overall objective of this study is to identify the best positional and/or ventilation practice that leads to improved patient outcomes in these critically ill children. We hypothesize that children with severe PARDS treated with either prone positioning or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) will demonstrate more days off the ventilator when compared to children treated with supine positioning or conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV).

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Acetaminophen and Ascorbate in Sepsis: Targeted Therapy to Enhance Recovery

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Prospective multi-center phase 2b randomized placebo-controlled double-blinded interventional platform trial of two different pharmacologic therapies (intravenous Vitamin C or intravenous Acetaminophen) for patients with sepsis-induced hypotension or respiratory failure.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Sigh Ventilation to Increase Ventilator-Free Days in Victims of Trauma at Risk for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    β€œThe study team wants to know if adding a sigh-type of breath to a ventilator reduces chances of developing more serious lung problems.”

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    A randomized, concurrent controlled trial to assess if adding sigh breaths to usual invasive mechanical ventilation of victims of trauma who are at risk of developing ARDS will decrease the number of days they require invasive mechanical ventilation.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

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