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Stress clinical trials at UC Health
5 in progress, 2 open to new patients

  • Enhanced Stress Resilience Training for Residents

    open to eligible people ages 18-64

    Burnout and overwhelming stress are growing issues in medicine and are associated with mental illness, performance deficits and diminished patient care. Among surgical trainees, high dispositional mindfulness decreases these risks by 75% or more, and formal mindfulness training has been shown feasible and acceptable. In other high-stress populations formal mindfulness training has improved well-being, stress, cognition and performance, yet the ability of such training to mitigate stress and burnout across medical specialties, or to affect improvements in the cognition and performance of physicians, remains unknown. To address these gaps and thereby promote the wider adoption of contemplative practices within medical training, investigators have developed Enhanced Stress Resilience Training, a modified form of MBSR - streamlined, tailored and contextualized for physicians and trainees. Investigators propose to test Enhanced Stress Resilience Training (ESRT), versus active control and residency-as-usual, in mixed-specialty interns (from Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Family Practice, OBGYN and Surgery Departments) evaluated for well-being, cognition and performance changes at baseline, post-intervention and three or six-month follow-up.

    at UCSF

  • Ethnic Influences on Stress, Energy Balance and Obesity in Adolescents

    open to eligible females ages 13-17

    The study will examine the mechanisms linking race, stress and biobehavioral factors to energy balance and obesity in both natural and controlled environments in African-American and Caucasian adolescent females.

    at UC Irvine

  • Life Enhancing Activities for Family Caregivers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Life Enhancing Activities for Family Caregivers is a six-week program designed to increase positive affect in people who care for a family member with dementia. The intervention consists of 6 weekly one-hour sessions conducted one-on-one with a trained facilitator to teach simple skills that are practiced at home in a study-supplied workbook. The program is preceded and followed by a 30-45 minute questionnaire. Follow-up assessments will be conducted at 1-month, 3-months, and 6-months post intervention. Primary hypothesis is that experimental subjects who participate in LEAF will demonstrate significantly greater improvements in psychological outcomes and will engage in more problem focused and positive appraisal forms of coping compared to the wait-list control condition.

    at UCSF

  • The Effects of Manipulating Expectations in an Online Gratitude Intervention

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Gratitude - an emotion felt when an individual receives something beneficial from other people or entities - has been shown to positively affect well-being. Beginning in 2003, "count your blessings" interventions - in which participants list items they are grateful for, and gratitude letter writing interventions were designed to cultivate gratitude. Gratitude interventions have many positive outcomes; they can increase well-being and life satisfaction (Froh, Sefick, & Emmons, 2008) and increase self-esteem (Rash, Matsuba, & Prkachin, 2011) to name a few. Gratitude interventions have been replicated in different populations, such as with adolescents and clinical groups. Knowing the benefits of gratitude prior to an intervention could affect participant behavior and health outcomes. Past studies have illustrated that sharing information about treatments changes expectations and improves outcomes (Zion & Crum, 2018). For instance, overt medical treatments are more effective than hidden ones (Colloca, Lopiano, Lanotte, & Benedetti, 2004). The proposed study is designed to evaluate whether expectations about intervention efficacy can enhance the benefits of a brief gratitude intervention. Specifically, the investigators will test if providing information on the benefits of gratitude will enhance intervention outcomes. This 3-armed randomized controlled trial will have the following conditions: gratitude + expectation, gratitude, and events control. Participants will be undergraduate college students and the online intervention will last two weeks. Participants in the two gratitude conditions will login to an online form three times a week for two weeks and make entries of up to five things they are grateful for. The form for participants in the gratitude + expectation condition will also provide information about benefits of gratitude. An everyday events control will be used to provide a neutral comparison condition. This group will be instructed to type up to five things or events of note from their day on their form. Outcome measures will be collected via an online survey before and immediately after the intervention. The primary outcome is well-being and the secondary outcomes are sleep quality and quantity, state gratitude, positive affect, healthcare self-efficacy, stress, and depressive symptoms. The investigators predict that participants in the gratitude + expectation condition will have enhanced intervention outcomes compared to participants in comparison conditions.

    at UCLA

  • The Impact of 8 Weeks of a Digital Meditation Application on Work Stress

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The aim of this study is to test the effects of a digital meditation intervention in a sample UCI employees who report mild to moderate stress. We will randomize UCI employees to either 8-weeks of a digital meditation intervention (using the commercially available application Headspace) or a waitlist control condition.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

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