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Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation clinical trials at University of California Health

6 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Arbitration Between Habitual and Goal-directed Behavior in Obsessive-compulsive Disorder: Circuit Dynamics and Effects of Noninvasive Neurostimulation

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    People utilize two behavioral strategies, goal-directed and habitual, when engaging in value-based decision-making that involves rewarding or punishing outcomes. Accumulating evidence suggests an imbalance between habitual and goal-directed behavior in favor of habitual control in parallel with exaggerated tendency toward compulsive/harm avoidance behavior in OCD. In healthy subjects, an arbitration mechanism has been proposed recently that controls the balance between those two strategies of action selection. Arbitration regions regulate the goal-directed/habitual decision-making balance by selectively downregulating the activity of the habitual regions. This project aims to explore the neurobehavioral characteristics of arbitration mechanism and its relationship with behaviors and clinical phenotypes in OCD by applying computational cognitive neuroscience, clinical task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) method.

    at UCLA

  • The Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on the Neuronal Mechanisms of Cognitive Control in Schizophrenia

    “Help us develop new treatments for patients who have difficulty with brain functions such as reasoning, including schizophrenic patients”

    open to eligible people ages 18-35

    The purpose of this study is to better understand the neural correlates of cognitive control (CC) deficits in schizophrenia and determine how these mechanisms can be modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). CC is a critical neurocognitive process that is required for flexible, directed thought and action based on goals and intentions. Identifying and developing paradigms to improve CC is therefore a mental health priority. Current theories of CC postulate that recruitment of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is essential for this process by maintaining high-level information that it can then use to orchestrate patterns of activation in other brain networks to support optimal performance. tDCS is a safe, noninvasive method of modulating regional brain excitability via brief (15-20 m) application of a weak (1-2 mA) current. The goal of the proposed experiments is to combine tDCS with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test the hypotheses that 1) acute tDCS over the DLPFC can improve performance during a CC task (the dot pattern expectancy (DPX) variant of the AX-Continuous Performance Task) in schizophrenia patients and healthy control subjects, and 2) acute tDCS over the DLPFC can increase recruitment of the DLPFC during the DPX. Effects of tDCS on brain functional connectivity (during CC as well as during the resting state) will also be examined, as well as effects on an episodic memory task. The current study will be the first to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the effects of tDCS on the neuronal mechanisms of CC in schizophrenia, and has potentially important implications for therapeutic development for this treatment refractory yet disabling aspect of the illness.

    at UC Davis

  • Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) Therapy in Major Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a low-intensity neuromodulation technique of minimal risk that has been used as an experimental procedure for reducing depressive symptoms and symptoms of other brain disorders. Though tDCS applied to prefrontal brain areas is shown to reduce symptoms in some people with major depressive disorder (MDD), the extent of antidepressant response often differs. Methods that map current flow directly in the brain while a person is receiving tDCS and that determine how functional neuroimaging signal changes after a series of tDCS sessions may help us understand how tDCS works, how it can be optimized, and if it can be used as an effective antidepressant. Investigators will address these questions in a two-part randomized double blind exploratory clinical trial. For this part of the study, investigators will determine relationships between target engagement and clinical outcomes (mood) and functional sub-constructs of cognitive control and emotion negativity bias, and whether imaging markers at baseline predict changes in antidepressant response. One hundred people with depression (50 in each group) will be randomized to receive either HD-tDCS or sham-tDCS for a total of 12 sessions each lasting 20 minutes occurring on consecutive weekdays. At the first and last session, subjects will receive 20-30 minutes of active or sham HD-tDCS in the MRI scanner, which will allow investigators to map tDCS currents, and track changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) pre-to- post treatment using completely non-invasive methods. At the first and last session and mid-way through the trial, participants will also complete a series of clinical ratings and neurocognitive tests.

    at UCLA

  • Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation as a Neuroprotection in Acute Stroke

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This proposal is a prospective, single-center, dose-escalation safety, tolerability, feasibility and potential efficacy study of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in acute stroke patients with substantial salvageable penumbra due to a large vessel occlusion who are ineligible for intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy.

    at UCLA

  • Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation as a Neuroprotection in Acute Stroke Before and After Thrombectomy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This proposal is a prospective, single-center, dose-escalation safety, tolerability, feasibility and potential efficacy study of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in acute stroke patients with substantial salvageable penumbra due to a large vessel occlusion before and after endovascular therapy.

    at UCLA

  • Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Post-stroke Motor Recovery

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    This research study is to find out if brain stimulation at different dosage level combined with an efficacy-proven rehabilitation therapy can improve arm function. The stimulation technique is called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The treatment uses direct currents to stimulate specific parts of the brain affected by stroke. The adjunctive rehabilitation therapy is called "modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy" (mCIMT). During this therapy the subject will wear a mitt on the hand of the arm that was not affected by a stroke and force to use the weak arm. The study will test 3 different doses of brain stimulation in combination with mCIMT to find out the most promising one.

    at UCLA

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