Skip to main content

Transient Ischemic Attack clinical trials at UC Health
3 in progress, 2 open to new patients

  • Apixaban for Early Prevention of Recurrent Embolic Stroke and Hemorrhagic Transformation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate if Apixaban will decrease the complication of having another stroke for people who have atrial fibrillation if initiated earlier than standard of care.

    at UCLA

  • Ischemia Care Biomarkers of Acute Stroke Etiology (BASE)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The proposed study will validate the clinical use of new biomarker blood tests to identify blood components that may differentiate between diverse stroke etiologies and clinical outcomes as listed below: 1. Differentiate between cardioembolic and large artery atherosclerotic ischemic strokes, when hemorrhagic stroke is ruled out. 2. In cases of ischemic strokes of unknown or "cryptogenic" etiology, determine the ability of biomarker blood tests to predict etiology between cardioembolic and large artery atherosclerotic. 3. In cases of cardioembolic ischemic stroke, further differentiation of cardioembolic ischemic strokes into those caused by atrial fibrillation (AF) and those not caused by AF. 4. Differentiate "transient ischemic attacks" (TIAs) from acute ischemic strokes. 5. Differentiate TIAs from non-ischemic "transient neurological events" (TNE) with similar symptoms.

    at UCSF

  • Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Triage and Evaluation of Stroke Risk

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a transient neurological deficit (speech disturbance, weakness…), caused by temporary occlusion of a brain vessel by a blood clot that leaves no lasting effect. TIA diagnosis can be challenging and an expert stroke evaluation combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could improve the diagnosis accuracy. The risk of a debilitating stroke can be as high as 5% during the first 72 hrs after TIA. TIA characteristics (duration, type of symptoms, age of the patient), the presence of a significant narrowing of the neck vessels responsible for the patient's symptoms (symptomatic stenosis), and an abnormal MRI are associated with an increased risk of stroke. An emergent evaluation and treatment of TIA patients by a stroke specialist could reduce the risk of stroke to 2%. Stanford has implemented an expedited triage pathway for TIA patients combining a clinical evaluation by a stroke neurologist, an acute MRI of the brain and the vessels and a sampling of biomarkers (Lp-PLA2). The investigators are investigating the yield of this unique approach to improve TIA diagnosis, prognosis and secondary stroke prevention. The objective of this prospective cohort study is to determine which factors will help the physician to confirm the diagnosis of TIA and to define the risk of stroke after a TIA.

    at UC Davis

Last updated: