Summary

Eligibility
for people ages 7-17 (full criteria)
Location
at UCSF
Dates
study started
estimated completion
Principal Investigator
by Courtney L Gallen (ucsf)

Description

Summary

This pilot study will evaluate the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of using a novel, adaptive attention training in pediatric cancer survivors.

Official Title

A Pilot Study of Assessing and Improving Cognition and Real-World Behavior in Pediatric Cancer Survivors

Details

Pediatric cancer survivors (PCS) often experience attentional difficulties that have downstream effects on their quality of life, academic achievement, and future occupational attainment. As such, the primary goal of this project is to examine the outcomes of a novel, mindful attention training in this population. Specifically, PCS will be randomly assigned to one of two adaptive attention training groups ('Engage') and complete tasks on the device for up to 8 weeks. Participants will also complete pre- and post-training assessments of cognition and behavior. The investigators hypothesize that completion of 'Engage' training will result in enhanced attentional control beyond the active comparator group that extends to other aspects of cognition in PCS.

Keywords

Pediatric Cancer Pediatric Cancer Survivor Attention Cognitive Control Adaptive Attention Training

Eligibility

You can join if…

Open to people ages 7-17

  • Have received radiation therapy to the brain or neck
  • Age 7-17 years at the time of radiation therapy
  • Survival >1 year after diagnosis
  • Currently not undergoing treatment

You CAN'T join if...

  • Not native English speaking
  • Motor or perceptual disability that prevents computer or tablet use

Location

  • Univeristy of California, San Francisco
    San Francisco California 94143 United States

Lead Scientist at University of California Health

Details

Status
not yet accepting patients
Start Date
Completion Date
(estimated)
Sponsor
University of California, San Francisco
ID
NCT05000905
Study Type
Interventional
Last Updated