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Hernia clinical trials at UC Health
7 in progress, 3 open to new patients

  • Complex Ventral Hernia Repair Using Biologic or Synthetic Mesh

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    Hernias are often treated using a prosthetic mesh to add support to the healing wound. Prosthetic meshes have been used for decades to repair ventral hernias, level 1 data regarding which type of mesh to use is limited. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, good and/or bad, of two types of prosthetic meshes: one that is made from pig skin (called a "biologic prosthetic"), and one that is made in a laboratory (called a "synthetic prosthetic"). This study will include some patients who have an infection in/near the hernia, and other patients who do not have an infection. We expect the synthetic mesh to be associated with a higher rate of early post-operative surgical site infection and fluid collections (seromas), while we expect the biologic mesh to be associated with a higher rate of recurrence.

    at UCSF

  • Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES): Laparoscopic Assisted Transvaginal Ventral Hernia Repair

    open to eligible females ages 18–75

    This is a prospective chart review/data collection study of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) for ventral hernia repair, that will include questionnaires administered throughout the study. Subjects enrolled will be those intending to have a transvaginal NOTES ventral hernia repair. Data will be collected and reviewed through 12 months post-op.

    at UCSD

  • Timing of Inguinal Hernia Repair in Premature Infants

    open to all eligible people

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether early (before NICU discharge) or late (55-60 weeks post-menstrual age) inguinal hernia repair is safer for premature infants who have an inguinal hernia.

    at UCLA

  • A Prospective, Multi-Center Study of Phasix™ Mesh for Ventral or Incisional Hernia Repair.

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Single-arm study of Phasix Mesh in High Risk patients looking at SSI and recurrence rates.

    at UCSD

  • A Study of Fibrin Sealant Plus Silver Microparticles to Prevent Incisional Hernias Following Abdominal Surgery

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Incisional hernias are a frequent consequence of abdominal surgery. Current clinical efforts are primarily focused on improving repair materials and surgical techniques to correct these hernias instead of the optimal solution: prevention. A product called MYOSEAL is currently being developed to prevent hernia formation after abdominal surgery by using fibrin tissue sealant and silver particles to prophylactically enhance the early wound healing of myofascial incisions. The purpose of this phase 1 study is to examine the safety of applying MYOSEAL immediately after abdominal wall suture closure in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. The investigators expect that applying this product to sutured myofascial incisions will increase collagen formation in the wound and thus prevent the formation of incisional hernias.

    at UCSF

  • Hernia Reduction Prior to Scheduled TIF Completion

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Hernia Reduction Prior to Scheduled TIF Completion using EsophyX ZR transoral device

    at UC Irvine

  • Percutaneous Endoscopic Tracheal Plug/Unplug for CDH

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is an anatomically simple birth defect in which contents of the fetal abdomen migrate into the chest due to incomplete formation of the diaphragm. Herniation of viscera into the chest prevents the fetal lungs from developing and growing to normal size. In the most severe cases, there is significant morbidity and mortality at birth. For these fetuses, fetal intervention may improve outcomes by enabling the lungs to grow enough in utero that they are capable of sustaining life after birth. This unblinded, non-randomized trial will assess the safety and efficacy of the use of the Goldvalve balloon and MiniTorquer microcatheter to perform percutaneous temporary tracheal occlusion to treat severe CDH in utero. The primary outcome variable will be fetal lung growth due to successful 'plugging/unplugging' of the trachea, as determined by serial lung-head ratio (LHR) measurements. Secondary outcome variables include maternal, fetal and neonatal variables, specifically neonatal survival at 90 days of life. For infants who survive beyond 90 days post-delivery, their families will be offered follow-up (up to 2 years of age and possibly beyond) in the Long-term Infant-to-Adult Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE) Clinic at UCSF.

    at UCSF