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Anxiety Disorders clinical trials at UC Health

19 in progress, 9 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • An Innovative Tailored Intervention for Improving Children's Postoperative Recovery (WebTIPS)

    open to eligible people ages 2-7

    The goal of this randomized trial is to examine the effectiveness of a tailored Internet-based Preparation Program (WebTIPS) in reducing anxiety and improving the recovery process in children undergoing surgery. Two hospitals and all parent-child dyads and healthcare providers (HCPs) will be randomized to either a Web-based Tailored Intervention Preparation for Surgery (WebTIPS) Group or to a Web-based Information (WebINFO) Group, the attention control group. The WebTIPS group will receive the newly developed intervention with short message service (SMS) two-way communication between an HCP and patient, while the WebINFO Group will only receive an internet and mobile platform with information on the management of preoperative anxiety and perioperative pain. The aims of this study are to: Primary aim: Quality of Clinical Care: Determine whether and to what extent WebTIPS is more effective than an attention control intervention in reducing preoperative anxiety among children ages 2-7 years old undergoing anesthesia and outpatient surgery. Secondary aims: Quality of Clinical Care: 1. Examine the impact of WebTIPS on Post-Anesthesia care unit based postoperative clinical recovery parameters, such as pain and emergence delirium. 2. Examine the impact of WebTIPS on home-based postoperative clinical recovery parameters such as pain, new onset behavioral changes and return to normal daily activity over 2 weeks. 3. Determine if the use of WebTIPS reduces parental preoperative anxiety. Experience of Care: Examine the effects of WebTIPS on parental satisfaction with the overall experience of the surgical episode. Cost of Care/Resource Use: Determine if WebTIPS modifies healthcare resource use, as measured by 30-day charges adjusted for Medicaid cost-to-charge ratios.

    at UC Irvine

  • Anxiety and Reward Interaction and Prediction of Outcomes in Anorexia Nervosa

    open to eligible females ages 12-19

    This study is designed to understand responsiveness to reward in adolescents with restricting-type anorexia nervosa compared with non-clinical controls, and how it is affected by potential-threat perception.

    at UCLA

  • Computerized Substance Use and Depression Screening and Behavioral Treatment in HIV Primary Care

    open to all eligible people

    Substance use disorders (SUDs), depression and anxiety in HIV-infected patients result in poor HIV outcomes, yet are often unrecognized and untreated. To address these problems, this study examines the implementation and effectiveness of a clinical intervention consisting of self-administered tablet-based SUD and depression screening at routine HIV primary care clinic visits, followed by evidence-based treatments for SUD, anxiety and depression delivered by a behavioral health specialist. If successful, this study has potential to reduce SUD-, anxiety- and depression-related problems and reduce HIV treatment disparities for patients with these comorbidities.

    at UCSF

  • Optimizing Exposure Therapy for Anxiety Disorders

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The study will compare the effects that two different approaches of exposure therapy have on reducing fear and anxiety in individuals with social anxiety disorder or panic disorder.

    at UCLA

  • Pre-operative Consultation on Patient Anxiety and First-time Mohs Micrographic Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18-100

    To determine if in-office pre-operative consultation has a significant effect on the anxiety level and overall post-operative satisfaction of patients undergoing first time Mohs surgery

    at UC Davis

  • Study of anxiety treatments in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    “How can therapy or medication better alleviate symptoms of anxiety and/or autism?”

    open to eligible people ages 8-14

    The Specifying and Treating the Anxiety Phenotype in Autism Spectrum Disorder (STAAR) study aims to better characterize the sub-group of children and preadolescents with ASD that exhibit clinically significant anxiety by conducting a 16-week randomized comparative treatment trial of the Behavioral Intervention for Anxiety in Children with Autism (BIACA), the medication sertraline, and placebo in youth with ASD ages 8-14 years old. The study involves 2-3 half day telehealth visits for behavioral and medical assessments, 1-2 lab visits for safety testing, and 1-2 optional fMRI visits. The study provides 16-weeks of anxiety treatment involving weekly BIACA therapy either in-person or through telehealth, or medical check-up visits either at the UC Davis MIND Institute or via telehealth. After study completion a 3 month follow up call is conducted and participants in the placebo group are given the option to participate in an additional study phase with the study treatment of their choice. Study participation can be done remotely through the use of telehealth and local labs, visits to the UC Davis MIND Institute are not required for most participants.

    at UC Davis

  • Treatment for Affect Dimensions

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Affect, or the tendency to experience a given emotion, often is subdivided into two domains. Positive affect is the tendency to experience positive emotions, such as happiness, excitement, elation, and enthusiasm. Negative affect is the tendency to experience negative emotions, such as anger, resentment, sadness, anxiety, and fear. Humans exhibit a range of emotions that span across positive and negative affect domains with some individuals experiencing more of one type of affect than another. Recent research and developing theories have suggested that mental health disorders can be conceptualized as the tendency for an individual to fall into one or more extremes on these categories. Therefore, treatments should not be based on targeting a conglomeration of symptoms (as we have been doing for the past century) but rather they should be treating the underlying dysregulation (e.g., high or low positive and negative affect). In an effort to address this gap, the current study plans to recruit participants for a treatment trial consisting of two psychotherapies: (a) positive affect treatment (PAT), and (b) negative affect treatment (NAT). The overarching goal of this project are to evaluate the target (i.e. potential mechanisms) of PAT. Participants will be randomized to either a 15-week positive (PAT) or negative affect treatment (NAT). Participants will also complete four laboratory visits (before treatment, during treatment (two times), and at post-treatment) to measure potential targets or mediators of PAT. These laboratory-based assessments will included measures of the positive affect system such as behavioral, subjective, and psychophysiological responses to reward, anticipation and motivation, reward attainment, and reward learning.

    at UCLA

  • Treatment for Comorbid Social Anxiety and Alcohol Use Disorders.

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) and social anxiety disorder (SAD) are highly comorbid and associated with significant impairment. Social anxiety comorbidity is associated with poorer addiction treatment engagement and outcomes. Thus, addressing underlying SAD symptoms that may lead to and maintain alcohol problems, as well as undermine successful treatment for AUD, is warranted. This proposal aims to develop and evaluate a fully integrated outpatient program for comorbid SAD and AUD that weaves evidence-based treatment for SAD (i.e., exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy) into a traditional, evidence-based treatment for AUD. First, the investigators will develop the protocol for the fully integrated treatment (FIT). The overarching goal of FIT will be to simultaneously deliver AUD and SAD treatment. Development will be an iterative process guided by previous research (including our own), and by input from clinicians, administrators, and patients in an outpatient substance use disorder treatment clinic. After the protocol is developed, the investigators will use their established clinician training procedures to train clinicians at their community partnered clinic to competently deliver the intervention. After protocol development and clinician training, the investigators will conduct a pilot randomized clinical trial (RCT) comparing the efficacy of our fully integrated treatment (FIT) for comorbid alcohol use and social anxiety disorders to usual care (UC) in the community substance use disorder specialty clinic. The goals of the RCT will be to gather data regarding acceptability, feasibility, and preliminary efficacy of the FIT protocol. The investigators will randomize treatment-seeking participants (N = 60) who have comorbid SAD and AUD. The investigators will assess treatment engagement, social anxiety outcomes, and alcohol use outcomes at baseline, 3-months, and 6-months from baseline. The investigators will also gather qualitative and quantitative acceptability data from patients after completing FIT, which may guide final refinements of FIT prior to testing in a larger-scale grant. The knowledge gained from this investigation has the potential to significantly improve the treatment of alcohol use disorders and make a significant public health impact. The focus on direct translation to community practice paradigms and the emphasis on full mental health and addiction treatment integration significantly advance the field.

    at UCLA

  • Validation of an Automated Online Language Interpreting Tool - Phase Two.

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    There is a pressing national need to provide higher-quality, more effectively accessible language interpretation services to improve the health outcomes of Americans who have limited English proficiency (LEP). This project addresses a critical component of this problem: The need to improve access to high quality, mental health services for diverse populations by improving the flow of clinical work across care settings (primary care and specialty care) through the use of innovative online asynchronous methods of language interpretation and clinical communication. The investigators are conducting a two phase study. The first phase is completed and involved developing and testing the interpreting tool. The second phase of the research is a clinical trial to compare two methods of cross-language psychiatric assessment.

    at UC Davis

  • Binge Eating Anxiety and Mood

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Binge Eating Disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder, and currently, the best behavioral treatments only work for 40-60% of adults. BED often co-occurs with mood and anxiety disorders, and both are associated with neurocognitive deficits related to executive function (EF). These EF deficits contribute to worsening BED symptoms and make it difficult for these adults to adhere to treatment recommendations. The proposed study aims to develop an EF training enhanced behavioral treatment for BED and compare its effectiveness to the standard cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with BED and a co-occurring mood or anxiety disorder.

    at UCSD

  • Collaborative Care for Women Veterans

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Implementation of Tailored Collaborative Care for Women Veterans (CCWV) is designed to enhance primary care-mental health integration for women Veterans, by tailoring services to women Veterans' and providers' needs and providing an evidence-based intervention, Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management, to address anxiety and depression in a patient-centered approach. CCWV will be implemented in four of the Women's Health Practice-Based Research Network sites, with careful attention to local tailoring and adaptation to enhance the fit of the care model in varied local contexts.

    at UCSD

  • Harnessing Online Peer Education Online Support Intervention for COVID-19 (HOPE COVID-19)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The Harnessing Online Peer Education COVID-19 (HOPE COVID-19) intervention will assess whether a peer-led online support community can improve behavioral health outcomes related to COVID-19.

    at UC Irvine

  • Latent Structure of Multi-level Assessments and Predictors of Outcomes for Women in Recovery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In this study the investigators will seek to improve their understanding of how positive and negative valence systems, cognition, and arousal/interoception are inter-related in disorders of trauma, mood, substance use, and eating behavior for women involved in a court diversion program in Tulsa, Oklahoma (Women in Recovery). The investigators will recruit 100 individuals and use a wide range of assessment tools, neuroimaging measures, blood and microbiome collections and behavioral tasks to complete the baseline and follow-up study visits. Upon completion, the investigators aim to have robust and reliable dimensional measures that quantify these systems and a set of assessments that should be recommended as a clinical tool to enhance outcome prediction for the clinician and assist in determining who will likely benefit from the diversion program, and to inform future revision or augmentation of the program to increase treatment effectiveness.

    at UCSD

  • Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Emotion Regulation

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Amygdala is highly involved in emotional response, emotional reactivity and anxiety. Amygdala functions are therefore involved in a wide range of psychiatric disorders including generalized and social anxiety, specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. Therefore, potential clinical implications of amygdala stimulation are great. However, to date, such efforts have been limited by the inability of non-invasive neuromodulation techniques (e.g. transcranial magnetic stimulation - TMS) to reach the amygdala and the highly invasive (i.e. neurosurgical) nature of methods (e.g. deep brain stimulation - DBS) which can, but to our knowledge has rarely been used, target these areas. In order to overcome these current limitations, study invesitgators propose the use of low intensity focused ultrasound pulsation (LIFUP) to affect amygdala activity to improve emotion regulation.

    at UCLA

  • MBCT for People With Parkinson's Disease and Caregivers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study aims to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in reducing anxiety and/or depressive symptoms in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and caregivers of people with PD.

    at UCSF

  • Mobile Virtual Positive Experiences for Anhedonia

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Anhedonia is a symptom dimension that characterizes many individuals suffering from depression, as well as some types of anxiety, psychosis, and substance use. For the most part, treatments are effective in decreasing negative affect but ineffective in improving anhedonia, with some antidepressant medications even worsening symptoms of anhedonia. Yet anhedonia is a significant marker of poor prognosis as well as suicidal ideation and actual suicide. The development of effective treatments for anhedonia is thus of paramount importance. Advances in neuroscience indicate specific targets that may underlie anhedonia that can be shifted through behavioral training. The investigators have developed such a program and found it to be effective in raising positive affect, especially for depressed or anxious individuals with anhedonia at baseline. To date, this program has been implemented by highly trained clinicians, which have supervised its implementation on a large scale. Moreover, the behavior program is dependent on readily available rewarding experiences, which anhedonia obviously challenges. Furthermore, mechanistic evaluation is impeded by intra¬- and inter-¬individual variability in exposure to rewarding stimuli. Virtual Reality (VR) offsets these barriers by repeated controlled immersion in experiences designed to enhance approach motivation, initial responsiveness to reward attainment, and reward learning. In this current study, the investigators aim to measure clinical outcomes using Virtual Reality-Reward Training (VR-RT).

    at UCLA

  • Pain Procedures and Anxiolysis Via Distraction With Virtual Reality

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of VR distraction on reducing anxiety patients undergoing interventional pain procedures compared to placebo/active placebo or a non VR option.

    at UC Davis

  • Social Support and Enhanced Fear Extinction

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    University of California, Los Angeles researchers will recruit healthy participants and anxious participants (those diagnosed with social anxiety disorder) age 18-55 years old to participate in a study examining whether the ability of social support figure reminders to enhance the extinction of fear in healthy participants extends to those with anxiety disorders. After being recruited from the UCLA community (healthy participants, n = 50) or referred by treatment providers at the Anxiety and Depression Research Center at UCLA (anxious participants, n = 50) and undergoing a telephone screening and in-person screening, 100 participants will be enrolled in the study. During the experiment, all participants will undergo the same procedures: undergoing a fear extinction procedure in which threatening cues--cues that predict electric shock--will be paired with either an image of a social support figure (provided by participants) or an image of a smiling stranger. These pairings will be presented repeatedly in the absence of shock in order for fear extinction to occur. Participants will return for a follow-up test to determine if fear extinction was successful.

    at UCLA

  • Social Support and Reduced Fear Acquisition

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    University of California, Los Angeles researchers will recruit healthy participants and anxious participants (those diagnosed with social anxiety disorder) age 18-55 years old to participate in a study examining whether the ability of social support figure reminders to prevent the acquisition of fear in healthy participants extends to those with anxiety disorders. After being recruited from the UCLA community (healthy participants, n = 50) or referred by treatment providers at the Anxiety and Depression Research Center at UCLA (anxious participants, n =50) and undergoing a telephone screening and in-person screening, 100 participants will be enrolled in the study. During the experiment, all participants will undergo the same procedures: undergoing fear acquisition procedures--the repeated pairing of a neutral image with a mild electric shock that ultimately leads to the association of threat of shock with the image--in the presence of an image of a social support figure (provided by participants) and an image of a smiling stranger.

    at UCLA

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