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Asthma clinical trials at UC Health
21 in progress, 13 open to new patients

  • Analysis of Inflammation and Microbiome in Patients With Sinusitis and Asthma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a cross-sectional, non-interventional study, consisting of three study arms, (1) Full Characterization (AIMS-Full), (2) Surgery Arm (AIMS-OR), and (3) Mucus Collection (AIMS-M). Participants will be recruited and enrolled in either AIMS-Full or AIMS-OR (based on participant availability). Participants who complete the initial characterization study (either AIMS-Full or AIMS-OR), may also go on to participate in the AIMS-M arm, which focuses mainly on sample collection. Participants who choose not to participate in either characterization arm are able to enroll directly into AIMS-M for sample collection only.

    at UCSF

  • Characterization of Adult Subjects for Asthmatic Research Studies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is designed to characterize subjects in terms of the nature and severity of their asthma and in terms of conditions that may alter the clinical expression of asthma. Some features will be obtained in all subjects. These include a medical history and baseline lung function tests. This characterization forms the basis for our database that facilitates research protocols.

    at UCSF

  • Characterizing Asthma Sputum Elasticity in the UCSF Severe Asthma Research Program

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study is designed to characterize subjects in terms of their sputum phenotype. The purpose of this study is to learn more about the impact of having abnormally elastic sputum on asthma severity by comparing subjects with severe as well as mild/moderate asthma to healthy controls. The characterization will include medical history, pulmonary function testing, imaging of the lungs and biospecimen collection.

    at UCSF

  • Home Visits For Medical and Educational Success Among Sacramento Schoolchildren With Asthma

    “Does your child miss school because of his/her asthma? We hope to share tools to address your child’s health and improve school attendance.”

    open to eligible people ages 5-12

    This study will establish a multi-disciplinary home visitation team consisting of a medical provider and school teacher or staff member, and will evaluate whether a series of visits from this team will help decrease school absenteeism among children with asthma.

    at UC Davis

  • Inpatient Clinical Trial of NAC

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    The purpose of this study is to determine the beneficial effect of n-acetylcysteine (NAC), an inhaled medication that breaks down mucus, on lung function. NAC is a medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of chronic diseases of the respiratory system, including asthma. With CT lung imaging, the investigators seek to identify a subgroup of patients with asthma with a 'mucus' profile. This is a single-arm study which means all participants will receive the same treatment.

    at UCSF

  • Interventions To Help Asthma Clinical Adherence

    open to eligible people ages 5-17

    To conduct a pilot test to estimate the effect of a novel reminder system in improving daily asthma controller medication adherence rates in children with monolingual Spanish-speaking guardians who have limited English Proficiency (LEP).

    at UCSF

  • Mechanisms of Exacerbation of Asthma

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    The purpose of this study is to identify the causes of asthma that were not previously suspected, to better understand the effects of inhaled steroids on asthma and to identify new way to treat asthma.

    at UCSF

  • Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award

    open to eligible people ages 18-50

    Asthmatics have inflammation in the large airways (tubes through which air travels in and out of the lungs). The large airways are located in the central lung. New research shows that asthmatics also have inflammation in the small airways. The small airways are located in the peripheral lung (the parts of the lung away from the central lung). Until now, most of the inhaled medications available have been made up of big particles that never reach the peripheral lung. The purpose of this study is to try to measure the level of inflammation in the peripheral lung in asthmatics and see if this inflammation can be decreased with different types of inhaled corticosteroids. The investigators will check airway inflammation before and after use of an inhaled corticosteroid that has a large particle size and should only reach the large airways (Flunisolide-CFC), and before and after use of an inhaled, small particle corticosteroid that should reach both the large and small airways (Flunisolide-HFA). Subjects will make 6 study visits over two phases of the study. In the first phase, the investigators will collect baseline information about subjects while they are using placebo (inactive substance). In the second phase, subjects will take either the large or small particle corticosteroid. Visits will involve questionnaires and various tests measuring lung function (such as spirometry, forced oscillation, and methacholine challenge). Exhaled nitric oxide will be measured as an indication of inflammation. Subjects will also measure and make note of lung function at home twice daily using a peak expiratory flow meter. Two of the visits will involve fiberoptic bronchoscopy so that the investigators may collect cells and tissue samples without surgery. Another two of the visits will involve the use of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans to indirectly evaluate disease in distant parts of the lungs.

    at UCLA

  • Sorting and Expression Profiling of Airway Cells From Humans (The SEARCH Study)

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    This will be a single site, mechanistic study of asthmatic subjects and healthy, non-asthmatic controls involving a baseline characterization visit and a research bronchoscopy visit. We will identify differences in airway epithelial epigenetic enhancer signatures in asthma, by analyzing freshly isolated airway epithelial cells from healthy controls and from well-characterized subjects with asthma.

    at UCSF

  • Study of the Inflammation and Airway Changes That Occur After Exposure to Allergen in Asthmatics

    open to eligible people ages 18-50

    This protocol describes a single site mechanistic study to investigate microRNAs (miRNAs) that are differentially expressed in the airway epithelium of patients with asthma at baseline and in response to allergen challenge. We hypothesize that allergen exposure enhances airway smooth muscle contractility and epithelial cell mRNA/miRNA production as a consequence of locally increased T-cell derived cytokine production. The study will involve three visits over the course of approximately 14 days. At Visit 1, participants will be characterized in detail with lung function testing, methacholine challenge testing, and allergen skin prick testing. At Visit 2, participants will undergo bronchoscopy with segmental allergen administration of either cat or dust mite standardized allergen extract. At Visit 3 (either 24 hours later or 7 days later), bronchoscopy will be performed to collect airway samples including bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), epithelial brushings and endobronchial biopsies. Sample analysis will include measurement of miRNA and mRNA expression in epithelial brushings (RNAseq and qPCR); analysis of cell surface markers on BAL cells and blood cells; and collection of endobronchial biopsies for immunostaining of immune cells localization, immunoblotting of smooth cell protein phosphorylation, analysis of mucin content and smooth muscle cell subculture. A total of 38 subjects (26 asthmatics with stable or well-controlled asthma, 6 allergic non-asthmatics and 6 non-allergic non-asthmatics) will complete the study.

    at UCSF

  • The Effect of 10-Week Exercise Training on Children With Asthma

    open to eligible people ages 8-35

    The goal of this research is to determine whether 10-weeks of exercise training can benefit asthmatic children and young adults with a history of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). The investigators will also study an exciting newly discovered aspect of gene expression regulation in the white blood cells known as epigenetics: a process that takes place when genomic changes happen as a result of exposure to the environment. This study is based on emerging exciting new data from this and other laboratories demonstrating that (a) white blood cells play an important role in bronchoconstriction in children, (b) gene and cytokine expression in circulating white blood cells are abnormal in asthma and (c) brief exercise may change genomic and inflammatory- profiles of these cells.Physical activity is an essential component of growth and health in children, thus, this research will lead to improved clinical uses of exercise as preventive and adjunctive therapy in the current epidemic of childhood asthma

    at UC Irvine

  • User-Friendly Spirometer and Mobile App for Self-Management and Home Monitoring of Asthma Patients

    open to eligible people ages 6-15

    The primary goal of this proposal is to use an in-home, smartphone-enabled, hand-held spirometer to determine the FEV1% predicted ranges that predict the Yellow Zone threshold.

    at UCSF

  • Using Breath Elements to Determine Specific Virus Infection in Asthmatic Patients

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    Respiratory virus infections cause a majority of asthma exacerbations in the fall to spring months. Current diagnostic platforms for respiratory viruses have limitations including cost, availability, and invasiveness. The use of noninvasive breath collection to analyze breath metabolites may be used to differentiate virus-infected asthmatics from other causes of acute asthma exacerbations.

    at UC Davis

  • Asthma and Indoor-air: Reducing Exposures

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Two hundred moderate to severely asthmatic children (6-12 years) will be enrolled in a study to look at the effectiveness of high efficiency filtration of indoor air in homes on reducing asthma symptoms. One intervention group will have high efficiency filters or filtration systems installed in their central heating and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The second intervention group will have high efficiency portable air cleaners placed in the child's bedroom and in the main living area. Each participant will receive true air filtration for a year and a placebo for a year. During the placebo period a sham filter will be used that removes very little of the particles. Measures of health effects will include days of symptoms, unplanned utilization of the healthcare system for asthma-related illness, short-term medication use, peak exhaled flow, spirometry, and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO).

    at UC Davis

  • Chitinases and Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGFB) in Human Asthma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to find out the roles of two specific gene families (the chitinase gene family and the TGFB family). We hypothesize that chitinases and TGFb pathway genes will be differentially expressed in the airways of non-asthmatic subjects and subjects with asthma. We further hypothesize that genetic variants in CHIT1, AMCase, and TGFb pathway genes that show associations with asthma and related phenotypes will change the expression and/or function of the protein of these genes in the airway in several ways, including the transcript numbers for full length genes and splice variants and, for the chitinase genes, the levels of chitinase activity in airway secretions.

    at UCSF

  • Implementing Pathways to Improve Pediatric Asthma Care

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Background: Asthma affects nearly 10% of American children, and is a leading cause of pediatric emergency visits and hospitalizations. Clinical pathways are operational versions of practice guidelines aimed at the hospital management of common illnesses. Single-site studies of pediatric asthma pathways have shown significant improvements in quality of care. Primary Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of clinical pathways for improving quality of care for children with asthma in a diverse, national sample of emergency department (ED) and hospital settings. Primary Endpoints: 1. Emergency Department: The proportion of eligible children who receive systemic steroids within 60 minutes of ED arrival 2. Inpatient/Hospital: Mean length of hospital stay Study Design: This project will be implemented through an established quality improvement collaborative of hospitals across the United States, the Value in Inpatient Pediatrics Network (part of the American Academy of Pediatrics). A cluster randomized design will be employed. Group 1 hospitals will receive a multifaceted implementation strategy that includes: 1) a pathway implementation toolkit, 2) local multidisciplinary champions in the ED and inpatient settings, 3) audit and feedback, 4) educational seminars, and 5) practice facilitation (via teleconference). Group 2 will receive the same intervention with the addition of a mobile app pathway tool.

    at UCSF

  • L-arginine in Severe Asthma Patients Grouped by Exhaled Nitric Oxide Levels

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The major impact of this study will be to identify the adult severe asthma cohort that will benefit from supplemental L-arginine therapy. The investigators hypothesize that a subset of adult severe asthma patients will respond to supplemental L-arginine and derive clinical benefit from the addition of this therapy to standard-of-care asthma medications. The investigators hypothesize that the patients that benefit most will have low exhaled nitric oxide concentrations (< 20 ppb) at baseline.

    at UC Davis

  • Pulmonary Specialist-Health Coach Consult Model Pilot

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The Pulmonary Specialist-Health Coach Consultation (PuSHCon) study examines the implemention of health coach-assisted consultations to improve access to specialist care and implementation of specialist recommendations for patients with COPD, asthma, and asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) for low-income and vulnerable patients seen at public health clinics. A limited number of patients (50) from two clinics will be enrolled in the pilot study; 25 patients from one clinic will receive a pulmonary consultation under usual care and 25 patients from the other clinic will receive the PuSHCon model.

    at UCSF

  • Role of microRNAs in T Cell-Driven Inflammation in Asthma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This will be a single center study of asthmatic subjects and healthy controls which will investigate mechanisms of asthma through detailed molecular analysis of airway tissues and fluids. The primary goal will be investigate the role of microRNAs in Th2-driven inflammation in asthma. The investigators hypothesize that asthma is associated with abnormal expression of miRNAs in T cells which favors differentiation into Th2-cells. The investigators further hypothesize that asthma is heterogeneous based on the presence and absence of Th2-driven inflammation and that abnormalities in T cell miRNA expression will be most prominent in a subgroup with high levels of Th2-driven inflammation (as assessed using molecular markers that the investigators have previously established). Finally, the investigators hypothesize that inhaled corticosteroids will normalize the T-cell miRNA abnormalities observed in asthma, as corticosteroids treat Th2-driven inflammation. The samples collected will also facilitate the pursuit of secondary analyses designed to investigate mechanisms of inflammation and remodeling in asthma as well as molecular phenotypes of asthma.

    at UCSF

  • Severe Asthma Research Program

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The mission of the SARP is to improve the understanding of severe asthma through integrated study of its clinical and biological features and to evaluate their changes over time. The ultimate goal of these efforts is to promote better treatments for severe asthma.

    at UCSF

  • Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP)- San Francisco Clinical Site

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The mission of SARP is to improve the understanding of severe asthma through integrated study of its clinical and biological features and to evaluate their changes over time. The ultimate goal of these efforts is to promote better treatments for severe asthma.

    at UCSF

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