Skip to main content

Brain Injuries clinical trials at University of California Health

24 in progress, 15 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • CBT-I for Veterans With TBI

    open to eligible people ages 18-55

    Many Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn era Veterans have suffered a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), and now cope with multiple post-injury symptoms, including sleep disturbances (especially insomnia). Chronic insomnia in mTBI patients has the potential to exacerbate other symptoms, delay recovery, and negatively affect many of the cognitive, psychological, and neuromuscular sequelae of mTBI, thereby decreasing quality of life. Although Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to be an effective evidence-based treatment for insomnia, there are no published randomized controlled trials evaluating the potential strengths and/or limitations of CBT-I in post-mTBI patients. Therefore, assessing CBT-I in the context of mTBI holds promise to provide substantial benefits in terms of improved rehabilitation outcomes in Veterans who have suffered mTBI.

    at UCSD

  • Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 22-80

    Chronic pain affects 1 in 4 US adults, and many cases are resistant to almost any treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) holds promise as a new option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant chronic pain, but traditional approaches target only brain regions involved in one aspect of the pain experience and provide continuous 24/7 brain stimulation which may lose effect over time. By developing new technology that targets multiple, complimentary brain regions in an adaptive fashion, the investigators will test a new therapy for chronic pain that has potential for better, more enduring analgesia.

    at UCSF

  • GOALS Cognitive Training Delivered to Aging Veterans in Person or Via Telehealth

    open to eligible people ages 65 years and up

    This study will use technology to deliver effective treatment for cognitive problems associated with TBI to Veterans at home, which may result in improved daily functioning and increased access to health care for the growing population of aging Veterans with history of TBI. The successful completion of this project may also increase older Veterans' ability to participate in research through increased understanding of the effect of in-home research opportunities on recruitment and retention. Additionally, the evidence gathered from this study may be used in future research studying home-based cognitive rehabilitation treatments for Veterans using telehealth technology.

    at UCSF

  • Hyperbaric Oxygen Brain Injury Treatment Trial

    open to eligible people ages 16-65

    The purpose of this innovative adaptive phase II trial design is to determine the optimal combination of hyperbaric oxygen treatment parameters that is most likely to demonstrate improvement in the outcome of severe TBI patients in a subsequent phase III trial.

    at UCSD

  • Learn about a study of emergency care in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    “We want to hear your opinions about this study! Click the green button below to share.”

    open to eligible people ages 14 years and up

    BOOST3 is a randomized clinical trial to determine the comparative effectiveness of two strategies for monitoring and treating patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the intensive care unit (ICU). The study will determine the safety and efficacy of a strategy guided by treatment goals based on both intracranial pressure (ICP) and brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2) as compared to a strategy guided by treatment goals based on ICP monitoring alone. Both of these alternative strategies are used in standard care. It is unknown if one is more effective than the other. In both strategies the monitoring and goals help doctors adjust treatments including the kinds and doses of medications and the amount of intravenous fluids given, ventilator (breathing machine) settings, need for blood transfusions, and other medical care. The results of this study will help doctors discover if one of these methods is more safe and effective.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Managing MTBI-related Headaches With rTMS

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    Persistent headache is one of the most common debilitating symptoms in military personnel suffering from mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). This study aims to assess the long-term effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in managing MTBI related headaches for up to 2-3 months by comparing the treatment effect of active-rTMS to sham-rTMS.

    at UCSD

  • Mild TBI Assessment & Rehabilitation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    One of the most pressing concerns within the VA currently is the provision of interventions that address the cognitive as well as emotional problems faced by Veterans with mild TBI and comorbid conditions. When completed, these studies will inform us whether training core attentional self-regulatory control functions via personally-relevant activities will be effective in improving daily life for Veterans with mild TBI and comorbid conditions. The study design will provide a test not only of potential benefits for real life functioning, but also determine to what extent these benefits are related to actual changes in cognitive/behavioral performance and brain networks corresponding to these functions. This project will provide a foundation for future studies to investigate the neural mechanisms that support improvements of cognition and behavior in mTBI.

    at UCSF

  • NOninVasive Intracranial prEssure From Transcranial doppLer Ultrasound Development of a Comprehensive Database of Multimodality Monitoring Signals for Brain-Injured Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an observational study in neurocritical care units at University of California San Francisco Medical Center (UCSFMC), Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital (ZSFGH), and Duke University Medical Center. In this study, the investigators will primarily use the monitor mode of the Transcranial Doppler (TCD, non-invasive FDA approved device) to record cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) signals from the Middle Cerebral Artery and Internal Carotid Artery. TCD data and intracranial pressure (ICP) data will be collected in the following four scenarios. Each recording is up to 60 minutes in length. Multimodality high-resolution physiological signals will be collected from brain injured patients: traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage, liver failure, and ischemic stroke. This is not a hypothesis-driven study but rather a signal database development project with a goal to collect multimodality brain monitoring data to support development and validation of algorithms that will be useful for future brain monitoring devices. In particular, the collected data will be used to support: Development and validation of noninvasive intracranial pressure (nICP) algorithms. Development and validation of continuous monitoring of neurovascular coupling state for brain injury patients Development and validation of noninvasive approaches of detecting elevated ICP state. Development and validation of approaches to determine most likely causes of ICP elevation. Development and validation of approaches to detect acute cerebral hemodynamic response to various neurovascular procedures.

    at UCSF

  • Outcome pRognostication of Acute Brain Injury With the NeuroloGical Pupil indEx

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The use of quantitative, automated, infrared technology for pupillary examination has long been used in ophthalmology and anesthesiology research. Its interest in neurocritical care has progressively grown, in parallel with the advancements in device technology. In this regard, the use of the noninvasive NPi®-200 pupillometer (Neuroptics, Laguna Hills, California, USA) allows the measurement of a series of dynamic pupillary variables (including the percentage pupillary constriction, latency, constriction velocity, and dilation velocity), which can be integrated into an algorithm, to compute the Neurological Pupil index (NPi). The NPi is a proprietary scalar index with values between 0 and 5 (with a 0.1 decimal precision), an NPi value < 3 indicating an abnormal pupillary reactivity. Importantly, the NPi is not influenced by sedation-analgesia, at the doses used in neurocritical care practice, and by mild hypothermia. Preliminary single-center data recently demonstrated that abnormal NPi is associated with worse outcome in patients with traumatic and hemorrhagic ABI, and can be a useful adjunct for ICP monitoring and therapy. There is currently a great need for quantitative tools to predict early prognostication in ABI patients, and the NPi appears of potential great value. We hypothesize that: 1. Abnormal NPi (defined as NPi <3) are strongly predictive of poor GOS-E (1-4) at 6 months after the acute event. 2. NPi=0 is strongly predictive of mortality (GOS 1). 3. Abnormal NPi is predictive of a higher ICP 20 index (number of end-hourly measures of ICP >20 mm Hg divided by the total number of measurements, multiplied by 100) and a greater burden of interventions needed to control ICP (measured by the Therapy Intensity Level scale for ICP management, Therapy Intensity Level (TIL) 4). Methods This international multicentre prospective observational study aims to recruit >400 patients admitted to intensive care units. Duration of the study 18 months, including 12-month of recruitment based on 60 patients/centre plus 6 months GOS-E follow-up.

    at UCSF

  • Personalized, Augmented Cognitive Training (PACT) for Service Members and Veterans With a History of TBI

    open to eligible people ages 18-55

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common medical condition that occurs when a head injury causes someone to lose consciousness, feel dazed or confused, or be unable to remember events occurring immediately after the injury. While most individuals with mild TBI recover within weeks or months, some individuals with mild TBI report chronic symptoms such as difficulty with cognitive skills like attention, learning, or memory, along with other symptoms such as irritability or headache. Previous studies, including those conducted by our scientific team, have shown that cognitive rehabilitation can help patients with persistent symptoms after mild TBI return to full duty, work, school, and other important life activities. Specifically, cognitive rehabilitation can provide lasting improvements in thinking abilities, functional capacity, post-concussive symptoms, and quality of life after mild TBI. However, effective interventions are still out of reach for many service members and Veterans with TBI. For patients who have returned to duty, employment, or education, scheduling up to 60 hours of treatment (a typical treatment schedule in many settings) may not be feasible. Additionally, some patients may live in areas where it is burdensome to make numerous visits to a medical center. Personalized Augmented Cognitive Training (PACT) compresses treatment into six hours of once-weekly personalized, one-on-one training by selecting treatment modules based on patient needs and priorities-substantially reducing the total amount of time required to complete treatment. PACT can be offered either in-person (in clinic) or via home-based video telemedicine, depending upon patients' preferences. Additionally, PACT includes training and encouragement for service members and Veterans to make self-directed use of mobile apps that train cognitive skills and strategies.The primary goal of this study is to evaluate whether PACT is effective at improving cognition, symptoms, and functional outcomes among military service members and Veterans with a history of mild TBI. The study will also yield information about factors that can enhance or interfere with treatment, such as number of previous TBIs, presence of post-traumatic stress; and choice of in-person vs. video telemedicine delivery of care.

    at UCSD

  • Thalamic Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound in Brain Injury

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Few neurological conditions are as scientifically mysterious and clinically, legally, and ethically challenging as disorders of consciousness. To date there exists no standard intervention for patients suffering from these devastating conditions. The present project is aimed at evaluating the potential of non-invasive Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Pulsation (LIFUP) of thalamus (a key area for the consciousness network) as a neurorestorative stimulation for those patients. In this study, LIFUP will be performed during two sessions. The proposed experiment will involve behavioral and paramedical measurements just before and after each of the two LIFUP sessions in a small sample of patients (up to 15 acute and 15 chronic patients) in order to evaluate the feasibility of a full scale clinical trial.

    at UCLA

  • The Biomarkers in the Hyperbaric Oxygen Brain Injury Treatment Trial (BioHOBIT)

    open to eligible people ages 16-65

    There are no therapeutic agents that have been shown to improve outcomes from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Critical barriers to progress in developing treatments for severe TBI are the lack of: 1) monitoring biomarkers for assessing individual patient response to treatment; 2) predictive biomarkers for identifying patients likely to benefit from a promising intervention. Currently, clinical examination remains the fundamental tool for monitoring severe TBI patients and for subject selection in clinical trials. However, these patients are typically intubated and sedated, limiting the utility of clinical examinations. Validated monitoring and predictive biomarkers will allow titration of the dose of promising therapeutics to individual subject response, as well as make clinical trials more efficient by enabling the enrollment of subjects likely to benefit. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), neurofilament light chain (NfL) and high sensitivity c-reactive protein (hsCRP) are promising biomarkers that may be useful as 1) monitoring biomarkers; 2) predictive biomarkers in severe TBI trials. Although the biological rationale supporting their use is strong, significant knowledge gaps remain. To address these gaps in knowledge, we propose an ancillary observational study leveraging an ongoing severe TBI clinical trial that is not funded to collect biospecimen. The Hyperbaric Oxygen in Brain Injury Treatment (HOBIT) trial, a phase II randomized control clinical trial that seeks to determine the dose of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) that that has the highest likelihood of demonstrating efficacy in a phase III trial. The proposed study will: 1) validate the accuracy of candidate monitoring biomarkers for predicting clinical outcome; 2) determine the treatment effect of different doses of HBOT on candidate monitoring biomarkers; and 3) determine whether there is a biomarker defined subset of severe TBI that responds favorably to HBOT. This proposal will: 1) inform a go/no-go decision for a phase III trial of HBOT by providing adjunctive evidence of the effect of HBOT on key biological pathways through which HBOT is hypothesized to affect outcome; 2) provide evidence to support further study of the first monitoring biomarkers of severe TBI; 3) increase the likelihood of success of a phase III trial by identifying the sub-population of severe TBI likely to benefit from HBOT; 4) create a repository of TBI biospecimen which may be accessed by other investigators. This study is related to NCT04565119

    at UCSD

  • The Use of LIFUP in Chronic Disorders of Consciousness

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    When patients survive a severe brain injury but fail to fully recover, they often enter a Disorder of Consciousness (DoC) --that is, a set of related conditions of decreased awareness and arousal including the Vegetative State (VS) and the Minimally Conscious State (MCS). When these conditions become chronic, there are no approved treatments to help bolster any further recovery. In prior work, we have shown the clinical feasibility and potential of Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Pulsation (LIFUP) as a remarkably safe form of non-invasive brain stimulation in these conditions.

    at UCLA

  • Transcranial Electrical Stimulation for mTBI

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a leading cause of sustained physical, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral deficits in OEF/OIF/OND Veterans and the general public. However, the underlying pathophysiology is not completely understood, and there are few effective treatments for post-concussive symptoms (PCS). In addition, there are substantial overlaps between PCS and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in mTBI. IASIS is among a class of passive neurofeedback treatments that combine low-intensity pulses for transcranial electrical stimulation (LIP-tES) with electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring. Nexalin is another tES technique , with FDA approvals for treating insomnia, depression, and anxiety. LIP-tES techniques have shown promising results in alleviating PCS individuals with TBI. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the effects of LIP-tES treatment in TBI are unknown, owing to the dearth of neuroimaging investigations of this therapeutic intervention. Conventional neuroimaging techniques such as MRI and CT have limited sensitivity in detecting physiological abnormalities caused by mTBI, or in assessing the efficacy of mTBI treatments. In acute and chronic phases, CT and MRI are typically negative even in mTBI patients with persistent PCS. In contrast, evidence is mounting in support of resting-state magnetoencephalography (rs-MEG) slow-wave source imaging (delta-band, 1-4 Hz) as a marker for neuronal abnormalities in mTBI. The primary goal of the present application is to use rs-MEG to identify the neural underpinnings of behavioral changes associated with IASIS treatment in Veterans with mTBI. Using a double-blind placebo controlled design, the investigators will study changes in abnormal MEG slow-waves before and after IASIS treatment (relative to a 'sham' treatment group) in Veterans with mTBI. For a subset of participants who may have remaining TBI symptoms at the end of all IASIS treatment sessions, MEG slow-wave changes will be recorded before and after additional Nexalin treatment. In addition, the investigators will examine treatment-related changes in PCS, PTSD symptoms, neuropsychological test performances, and their association with changes in MEG slow-waves. The investigators for the first time will address a fundamental question about the mechanism of slow-waves in brain injury, namely whether slow-wave generation in wakefulness is merely a negative consequence of neuronal injury or if it is a signature of ongoing neuronal rearrangement and healing that occurs at the site of the injury. Specific Aim 1 will detect the loci of injury in Veterans with mTBI and assess the mechanisms underlying functional neuroimaging changes related to IASIS treatment, and for a subset of Veterans with remaining symptoms, additional Nexalin treatment, using rs-MEG slow-wave source imaging. The investigators hypothesize that MEG slow-wave source imaging will show significantly higher sensitivity than conventional MRI in identifying the loci of injury on a single-subject basis. The investigators also hypothesize that in wakefulness, slow-wave generation is a signature of ongoing neural rearrangement / healing, rather than a negative consequence of neuronal injury. Furthermore, the investigators hypothesize IASIS will ultimately reduce abnormal MEG slow-wave generation in mTBI by the end of the treatment course, owing to the accomplishment of neural rearrangement / healing. Specific Aim 2 will examine treatment-related changes in PCS and PTSD symptoms in Veterans with mTBI. The investigators hypothesize that compared with the sham group, mTBI Veterans in the IASIS treatment group will show significantly greater decreases in PCS and PTSD symptoms between baseline and post-treatment assessments. Specific Aim 3 will study the relationship among IASIS treatment-related changes in rs-MEG slow-wave imaging, PCS, and neuropsychological measures in Veterans with mTBI. The investigators hypothesize that Reduced MEG slow-wave generation will correlate with reduced total PCS score, individual PCS scores (e.g., sleep disturbance, post-traumatic headache, photophobia, and memory problem symptoms), and improved neuropsychological exam scores between post-IASIS and baseline exams. The success of the proposed research will for the first time confirm that facilitation of slow-wave generation in wakefulness leads to significant therapeutic benefits in mTBI, including an ultimate reduction of abnormal slow-waves accompanied by an improvement in PCS and cognitive functioning.

    at UCSD

  • Treatment for Patients With Chronic Post-Concussion Symptoms

    open to eligible people ages 13-25

    The current project will examine the effect of a brief psychological intervention on post-concussion symptoms, neurocognitive function, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and psychophysiological and salivary cortisol markers of autonomic nervous system (ANS) in a sample of 20 participants between 13-25 years of age who experience long-term post-concussive (PC) symptoms 2-9 months post-injury as well as 20 age- and sex-matched controls (non-injured) participants to provide normative data on all the above measures except for concussive symptoms.

    at UCLA

  • Advancing Understanding of Transportation Options

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This Stage II randomized, controlled, longitudinal trial seeks to assess the acceptability, feasibility, and effects of a driving decision aid use among geriatric patients and providers. This multi-site trial will (1) test the driving decision aid (DDA) in improving decision making and quality (knowledge, decision conflict, values concordance and behavior intent); and (2) determine its effects on specific subpopulations of older drivers (stratified for cognitive function, decisional capacity, and attitudinally readiness for a mobility transition). The overarching hypotheses are that the DDA will help older adults make high-quality decisions, which will mitigate the negative psychosocial impacts of driving reduction, and that optimal DDA use will target certain populations and settings.

    at UCSD

  • Clinical Evaluation of the i-STAT TBI Test

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical performance of the i-STAT TBI test for the proposed intended use; to assist in determining the need for a CT scan in patients presenting with suspected mild traumatic brain injury who are 18 years of age or older. The secondary objective of this study is the collection of additional data and specimens from all study subjects that may support other purposes related to the understanding of TBI.

    at UCSF

  • Comparison of Two Group Wellness Interventions for Individuals With Neurologic Conditions and Their Support Persons

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Approximately 5.3 million people live with a long-term disability resulting from a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and between 5-8% of those older than 60 suffer from Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia (ADRD). Consequences of these conditions can result in dramatic and persistent changes in functioning, impacting not only the patients, but also loved ones who become informal support persons. Many existing services help the family in the moment, but do not address long-term wellness. Thus, the purpose of this research study is to compare the effect of two different types of group wellness treatments for individuals with chronic mild TBI, moderate to severe TBI, and ADRD and their support persons.

    at UCSD

  • Exogenous Lactate Infusion in Traumatic Brain Injury (ELI-TBI)

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Metabolic crisis is a state of energy insufficiency due to impaired mitochondrial function as indicated by cerebral microdialysis lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR). We have performed preliminary mechanistic analysis of alternative fuels in humans and have demonstrated proof of concept that exogenous fuels alter brain metabolism. We will conduct a multicenter, adaptive design-based, proof of concept phase 2 safety study of candidate supplemental fuels in patients with severe traumatic brain injury to determine safety and efficacy.

    at UCLA

  • MRI Markers of Outcome After Severe Pediatric TBI

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death or disability in children. Each year in the United States, pediatric TBI results in an estimated 630,000 emergency room visits, 58,900 hospitalizations, and 7000 deaths. The incidence of long-term disability after severe TBI is high, with over 60% of children requiring educational or community based supportive services 12 months post-injury. Over 5,000 children require inpatient rehabilitation after TBI each year and an estimated 145,000 US children are currently living with disabilities after a severe TBI. Hospital costs for the acute treatment of children with TBI are estimated at ~$2.6 billion each year, while the gross annual costs accounting for long-term care and lost productivity approach $60 billion. Therefore, pediatric TBI is a major public health concern and new ways to diagnose and treat TBI are urgently needed.

    at UCSD

  • Retraining Neural Pathways Improves Cognitive Skills After A Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The proposed study tests the feasibility (Phase I) and efficacy (Phase II) of PATH neurotraining to improve working memory and attention in mTBI patients rapidly and effectively to provide clinical testing of a therapeutic training for the remediation of cognitive disorders caused by a concussion. This study will contribute to the fundamental knowledge of how to remediate concussions from a mTBI to enhance the health, lengthen the life and reduce the disabilities that result from a mTBI.

    at UCSD

  • The Ketogenic Diet for Pediatric Acute Brain Injury

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This is a prospective pilot study evaluating the safety and feasibility of implementing the ketogenic diet in children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with acute brain injury such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Animal studies suggest that in the aftermath of injury the brain's ability to use glucose as a fuel is impaired. The ketogenic diet is a high fat, low carbohydrate diet which is already used in clinical practice for the treatment of medication resistant epilepsy and is intended to switch the body over to burning fat rather than carbohydrates for fuel. In lieu of their standard tube-feeds, 5-10 children admitted to the PICU with these diagnoses will receive low carbohydrate, high fat ketogenic feeds for 2 weeks. We hypothesize that ketones will be detectable through serum tests and MRI spectroscopy studies of the brain within several days of diet initiation, and that there will be a low incidence of side effects and adverse events, Measures of interest will include the incidence of kidney stones, excessive acidosis and excessive hypoglycemia. The feasibility of implementing this protocol for a larger efficacy trial will be assessed through serial measurements of blood glucose, beta-hydroxybutyrate (a type of ketone body), and serum bicarbonate levels. In addition, levels of ketone bodies within the brain will be measured through MRI spectroscopy sequence which will be acquired at the same time as a follow-up MRI brain study ordered for clinical purposes.

    at UCLA

  • Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) Precision Medicine Phase 2 Option 1

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This study is being conducted to validate early and ultra-early blood-based and novel imaging biomarkers of Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI), Microvascular Injury (MVI), and neuroinflammation that may serve as predictive and pharmacodynamic biomarkers in a new cohort of moderate-severe TRACK-TBI subjects. The study team will enroll a cohort of moderate to severe TBI subjects (N=50), stratified according to VA/DoD criteria for these injury severities through the existing TRACK-TBI network sites to obtain novel advanced neuroimaging and more frequent biomarker sampling. Subjects will be assessed over 3 months.

    at UCSF

  • Traumatic Injury Clinical Trial Evaluating Tranexamic Acid in Children: An Efficacy Study

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Trauma is the leading cause of death and disability in children in the United States. The objective of this study is to evaluate the benefits and harms of tranexamic acid (TXA; a drug that stops bleeding) in severely injured children with hemorrhagic brain and/or torso injuries. Using thromboelastography, we will measure baseline fibrinolysis to assess for treatment effects of TXA at different levels of fibrinolysis.

    at UC Davis

Last updated: