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Cervical Cancer clinical trials at UC Health
25 in progress, 11 open to new patients

  • An experimental medicine, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin

    “Experimental combination treatment for Cervical, Upper Vaginal, and Uterine Cancers”

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of adavosertib when given together with external beam radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with cervical, vaginal, or uterine cancer. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. External beam radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving adavosertib, external beam radiation therapy, and cisplatin may work better in treating patients with cervical, vaginal, or uterine cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • CA-IX, p16, Proliferative Markers, and HPV in Diagnosing Cervical Lesions in Patients With Abnormal Cervical Cells

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This research trial studies carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA-IX), p16, proliferative markers, and human papilloma virus (HPV) in diagnosing cervical lesions in patients with abnormal cervical cells. Studying biomarkers in abnormal cervical cells may improve the ability to find cervical lesions and plan effective treatment.

    at UCLA UC Irvine UCSD

  • Collecting and Studying Tissue Samples From Patients With HIV-Associated Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    RATIONALE: Collecting and studying tissue samples from patients with cancer in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that occur in DNA and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    PURPOSE: This research trial studies collecting tissue samples from patients with HIV-related malignancies.

    at UCSD UCLA

  • Efficacy and Safety Study of First-line Treatment With Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) Plus Chemotherapy Versus Placebo Plus Chemotherapy in Women With Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer (MK-3475-826/KEYNOTE-826)

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of pembrolizumab (MK-3475) plus one of four platinum-based chemotherapy regimens compared to the efficacy and safety of placebo plus one of four platinum-based chemotherapy regimens in the treatment of adult women with persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer. Possible chemotherapy regimens include: paclitaxel plus cisplatin with or without bevacizumab and paclitaxel plus carboplatin with or without bevacizumab. The primary study hypotheses are that the combination of pembrolizumab plus chemotherapy is superior to placebo plus chemotherapy with respect to: 1) Progression-free Survival (PFS) per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST 1.1) as assessed by blinded independent central review (BICR), or, 2) Overall Survival (OS).

    at UC Irvine

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Rare Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial enrolls participants for the following cohorts based on condition: 1. Epithelial tumors of nasal cavity, sinuses, nasopharynx: A) Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx and trachea (excluding laryngeal, nasopharyngeal cancer [NPC], and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck [SCCHN]) B) Adenocarcinoma and variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx. 2. Epithelial tumors of major salivary glands 3. Salivary gland type tumors of head and neck, lip, esophagus, stomach, trachea and lung, breast and other location 4. Undifferentiated carcinoma of gastrointestinal (GI) tract 5. Adenocarcinoma with variants of small intestine 6. Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of GI tract (stomach small intestine, colon, rectum, pancreas) 7. Fibromixoma and low grade mucinous adenocarcinoma (pseudomixoma peritonei) of the appendix and ovary 8. Rare pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma 9. Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma 10. Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and bile duct tumors 11. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of lung 12. Bronchoalveolar carcinoma lung. This condition is now also referred to as adenocarcinoma in situ, minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma. 13. Non-epithelial tumors of the ovary: A) Germ cell tumor of ovary B) Mullerian mixed tumor and adenosarcoma 14. Trophoblastic tumor: A) Choriocarcinoma 15. Transitional cell carcinoma other than that of the renal, pelvis, ureter, or bladder 16. Cell tumor of the testes and extragonadal germ tumors: A) Seminoma and testicular sex cord cancer B) Non seminomatous tumor C) Teratoma with malignant transformation 17. Epithelial tumors of penis - squamous adenocarcinoma cell carcinoma with variants of penis 18. Squamous cell carcinoma variants of the genitourinary (GU) system 19. Spindle cell carcinoma of kidney, pelvis, ureter 20. Adenocarcinoma with variants of GU system (excluding prostate cancer) 21. Odontogenic malignant tumors 22. Endocrine carcinoma of pancreas and digestive tract 23. Neuroendocrine carcinoma including carcinoid of the lung 24. Pheochromocytoma, malignant 25. Paraganglioma 26. Carcinomas of pituitary gland, thyroid gland parathyroid gland and adrenal cortex 27. Desmoid tumors 28. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors and NF1-related tumors 29. Malignant giant cell tumors 30. Chordoma 31. Adrenal cortical tumors 32. Tumor of unknown primary (Cancer of Unknown Primary; CuP) 33. Not Otherwise Categorized (NOC) Rare Tumors [To obtain permission to enroll in the NOC cohort, contact: S1609SC@swog.org] 34. Adenoid cystic carcinoma 35. Vulvar cancer 36. MetaPLASTIC carcinoma (of the breast) 37. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)

    at UC Irvine UCSD UC Davis

  • Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy in Patients With Stage I or Stage II Cervical Cancer Who Previously Underwent Surgery

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies radiation therapy with chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to radiation therapy alone in treating patients with stage I or stage II cervical cancer who previously underwent surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known whether giving radiation therapy together with chemotherapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone in treating patients with cervical cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • Standard of Care Treatment for Newly Diagnosed Cervical or Vaginal Cancer With or Without Triapine

    “You are being asked to take part in this study because you have newly-diagnosed cervical or vaginal cancer that cannot be operated on.”

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies radiation therapy and cisplatin with triapine to see how well they work compared to the standard radiation therapy and cisplatin alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA cervical cancer or stage II-IVA vaginal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Triapine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy and cisplatin are more effective with triapine in treating cervical or vaginal cancer.

    at UCSD UC Davis

  • Study of ADXS11-001 in Subjects With High Risk Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    High-risk locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix (HRLACC) following concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This is a group of patients with a significant unmet need. The estimated probability of disease recurrence or death within 4 years of diagnosis is 50% and the prognosis is very grave for those who experience a recurrence. The purpose of the study is to compare the disease free survival (DFS) of ADXS11-001 to placebo administered following CCRT with curative intent in subjects with HRLACC.

    at UCSF

  • Study of REGN2810 in Adults With Cervical Cancer

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    The primary objective is to compare overall survival (OS) for patients with recurrent or metastatic platinum-refractory cervical cancer treated with either REGN2810 or investigator's choice (IC) chemotherapy. The secondary objectives are: - To compare progression-free survival (PFS) of REGN2810 versus IC chemotherapy - To compare overall response rate (ORR) (partial response [PR] + complete response [CR]) of REGN2810 versus IC chemotherapy per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1 - To compare the duration of response (DOR) of REGN2810 versus IC chemotherapy - To compare the safety profiles of REGN2810 versus IC chemotherapy by describing adverse events (AE) - To compare quality of life (QOL) for patients treated with REGN2810 versus IC chemotherapy using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30)

    at UC Irvine

  • Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the physical function and quality-of-life before and after surgery in patients with stage I cervical cancer. Studying quality-of-life in patients undergoing surgery for cervical cancer may help determine the intermediate-term and long-term effects of surgery.

    at UCSD UC Irvine UCLA

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UC Davis

  • A Trial of Tisotumab Vedotin in Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    A Single arm, Multicenter, International Trial of Tisotumab Vedotin (HuMax®-TF-ADC) in Previously Treated, Recurrent or Metastatic Cervical Cancer.

    at UCLA UC Davis

  • Brivanib Alaninate in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well brivanib alaninate works in treating patients with cervical cancer that has come back. Brivanib alaninate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth or by blocking blood flow to the tumor.

    at UCSF

  • Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ipilimumab when given after chemoradiation therapy in treating patients with stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA cervical cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, may find tumor cells and help carry tumor-killing substances to them. Giving ipilimumab together with chemoradiation therapy may be a better way treat cervical cancer.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Chemotherapy and Pelvic Radiation Therapy With or Without Additional Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Early-Stage Cervical Cancer After Radical Hysterectomy

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether chemotherapy and radiation therapy are more effective when given with or without additional chemotherapy in treating cervical cancer.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying chemotherapy and pelvic radiation therapy to see how well they work when given with or without additional chemotherapy in treating patients with high-risk early-stage cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy.

    at UCSD

  • Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of paclitaxel and carboplatin after cisplatin and radiation therapy in treating patients with stage IB-IVA cervical cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving paclitaxel and carboplatin after cisplatin and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.

    at UC Irvine

  • Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well giving cisplatin and radiation therapy together with or without carboplatin and paclitaxel works in treating patients with cervical cancer has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, carboplatin, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of [cancer/tumor] cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. External radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Internal radiation uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether giving cisplatin and external and internal radiation therapy together with carboplatin and paclitaxel kills more tumor cells.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis UCLA

  • Decreasing Over Screening and Treatment of Cervical Precancers in Young Women

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The goal of this study is to prevent over screening and over treatment of young women for cervical precancers, which can result in psychological distress and has been associated with future risk of premature deliveries. Current national guidelines recommend that routine screening be performed at less-frequent intervals and that excisional cervical therapies are discouraged in young women. The objectives of this study are to examine physician- and patient-based interventions designed to decrease over screening and over treatment by increasing adherence to US guidelines for women under 30 years.

    at UCSF UCLA

  • HuMax-AXL-ADC Safety Study in Patients With Solid Tumors

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of the trial is to determine the maximum tolerated dose and to establish the safety profile of HuMax-AXL-ADC in a mixed population of patients with specified solid tumors

    at UCSD

  • Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Human Papilloma Virus-Related Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well ipilimumab works in treating patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-related cervical cancer that has come back or that has spread to other areas of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, can find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them.

    at UC Davis

  • Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This clinical trial studies lymphedema after surgery in patients with endometrial cancer, cervical cancer, or vulvar cancer. Collecting information over time about how often lymphedema occurs in patients undergoing surgery and lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancer, cervical cancer, and vulvar cancer may help doctors learn more about the disease and plan the best treatment.

    at UCLA

  • Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well nivolumab works in treating patients with cervical cancer that has grown, come back, or spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.

    at UCSD

  • Phase 1-2 Study of ADXS11-001 or MEDI4736 Alone or Combo In Cervical or HPV+ Head & Neck Cancer

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Part A: (ADXS11-001 + MEDI4736 Combination Therapy) will determine the safety and tolerability of the combination and to identify a RP2D. Part B: Phase 2 design which will randomize subjects 1:1 to either MEDI4736 alone or MEDI4736+ADXS11-001 in subjects who have failed at least 1 prior systemic treatment for their recurrent/persistent or metastatic cervical cancer.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Standard Versus Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Endometrial or Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays and other types of radiation to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying two different methods of radiation and their side effects and comparing how well they work in treating endometrial and cervical cancer after surgery.

    at UCSD UC Davis

  • Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well vaccine therapy works in treating patients with cervical cancer that does not go to remission despite treatment (persistent) or has come back (recurrent). Vaccines therapy may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells.

    at UCSD UCSF

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