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Esophageal Cancer clinical trials at UC Health

19 in progress, 11 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of MGD013 in Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Neoplasms

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary goal of this Phase 1 study is to characterize the safety and tolerability of MGD013 and establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of MGD013. Pharmacokinetics (PK), immunogenicity, pharmacodynamics (PD), and the anti-tumor activity of MGD013 will also be assessed.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of the Experimental Combination of Olaparib and Ramucirumab For Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of olaparib when given together with ramucirumab and how well they work in treating patients with gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), has come back (recurrent), or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ramucirumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving olaparib and ramucirumab may work better in treating patients with gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer compared to ramucirumab and paclitaxel (a chemotherapy drug) or ramucirumab alone.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • A Study to Evaluate the Safety and Tolerability of Immunotherapy Combinations in Participants With Advanced Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation and dose-expansion study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD) and clinical activity of AB928 in combination with AB122 (an anti-PD-1 antibody) in participants with advanced malignancies.

    at UCLA

  • APX005M With Concurrent Chemoradiation for Resectable Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of CD40 agonistic monoclonal antibody APX005M (APX005M), chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, and to see how well they work when given before surgery in treating patients with esophageal cancer or gastroesophageal cancer that can be removed by surgery. APX005M is intended to stimulate the body's own immune system so that the immune cells can more effectively invade and destroy the tumor, adding to the benefits of the chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving APX005M, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.

    at UCSF

  • Experimental Cabozantinib With Pembrolizumab for Metastatic Gastric and Gastroesophageal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 2 single-arm, open-label clinical trial determining efficacy of cabozantinib in combination with pembrolizumab in subjects with advanced gastric and gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma. These are subjects who have progressed, or not tolerated, at least one prior line of chemotherapy with a fluoropyrimidine and platinum agent.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Experimental PET Imaging Scans Before Cancer Surgery to Study the Amount of PET Tracer Accumulated in Normal and Cancer Tissues

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies a new imaging technique called FAPi PET/CT to determine where and to which degree the FAPI tracer (68Ga-FAPi-46) accumulate in normal and cancer tissues in patients with non-prostate cancer. The research team also want to know whether what they see on PET/CT images represents the tumor tissue being excised from the patient's body. The research team is also interested to investigate another new imaging technique called PSMA PET/CT. Participants will be invited to undergo a second PET/CT scan, with the PSMA tracer (68Ga-PSMA-11). This is not required but just an option for volunteer patients. Patients can decide to have only the FAPI PET/CT scan. The PET/CT scanner combines the PET and the CT scanners into a single device. This device combines the anatomic (body structure) information provided by the CT scan with the metabolic information obtained from the PET scan. PET is an established imaging technique that utilizes small amounts of radioactivity attached to very minimal amounts of, in the case of this research, 68Ga-PSMA-11 and 68Ga-FAPi. Because some cancers take up 68Ga-PSMA-11 and/or 68Ga-FAPi it can be seen with PET. CT utilizes x-rays that traverse the body from the outside. CT images provide an exact outline of organs where it occurs in patient's body. FAP stands for Fibroblast Activation Protein. FAP is produced by cells that surround tumors. The function of FAP is not well understood but imaging studies have shown that FAP can be detected with FAPI PET/CT. Imaging FAP with FAPI PET/CT may in the future provide additional information about various cancers. PSMA stands for Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen. This name is incorrect as PSMA is also found in many other cancers. The function of PSMA is not well understood but imaging studies have shown that PSMA can be detected with PET in many non-prostate cancers. Imaging FAP with PET/CT may in the future provide additional information about various cancers.

    at UCLA

  • Experimental TAS-102 and Irinotecan for Gastric and Gastroesophageal Adenocarcinoma (stomach cancer)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase Ib single-arm, open-label clinical trial determining the feasibility and efficacy of TAS-102 and irinotecan in subjects with advanced gastric and gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma. These are subjects who are not candidates for curative treatments and who have received at least one prior line of chemotherapy with a fluoropyrimidine and platinum agent.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Experimental Tislelizumab With Chemotherapy For Inoperable, Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a randomized (1:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 study designed to compare the efficacy and safety of tislelizumab or placebo plus chemotherapy as first-line (1L) therapy for locally advanced unresectable or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma.

    at UC Davis

  • Gevokizumab With Standard of Care Anti-cancer Therapies for Metastatic Colorectal, Gastroesophageal, and Renal Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will determine the pharmacodynamically-active dose of gevokizumab and the tolerable dose and preliminary efficacy of gevokizumab in combination with the standard of care anti-cancer therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, metastatic gastroesophageal cancer and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    at UCLA

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

  • TREAT-BE Study (Treatment With Resection and Endoscopic Ablation Techniques for Barrett's Esophagus)

    open to eligible people ages 18-100

    A prospective outcomes study in patients with and esophageal cancer (EAC) and Barrett's esophagus (BE) associated neoplasia being evaluated for endoscopic eradication therapy (EET).

    at UCLA

  • A Study of the Experimental Medicine INCB001158 Combined With Chemotherapy For Solid Tumor Cancers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this open-label nonrandomized Phase 1/2 study is to evaluate INCB001158 in combination with chemotherapy in participants with advanced/metastatic solid tumors.

    at UC Davis

  • Futibatinib in Patients With Specific FGFR Aberrations

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of futibatinib in patients with FGFR aberrations in 3 distinct cohorts. Patients will be enrolled into one of 3 cohorts: patients with advanced, metastatic or locally-advanced solid tumors harboring FGFR1-4 rearrangements (excluding primary brain tumors and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma [iCCA]); patients with gastric or gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancer harboring FGFR2 amplification; and patients with myeloid or lymphoid neoplasms with FGFR1 rearrangements.

    at UCLA

  • Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy With or Without Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Cetuximab may stop the growth of esophageal cancer by blocking blood flow to the tumor. It is not yet known whether giving paclitaxel and cisplatin together with radiation therapy is more effective with or without cetuximab in treating esophageal cancer.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is comparing how well giving paclitaxel and cisplatin together with radiation therapy works with or without cetuximab in treating patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • PET Scan Imaging in Assessing Response in Patients With Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: PET scans done during chemotherapy may help doctors assess a patient's response to treatment and help plan the best treatment.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase II trial is studying PET scan imaging in assessing response in patients with esophageal cancer receiving combination chemotherapy.

    at UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Metastatic Gastrointestinal Cancers

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy works for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer that are spreading to other places in the body (metastatic). Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. This trial is being done to determine if giving radiation therapy to patients who are being treated with immunotherapy and whose cancers are progressing (getting worse) can slow or stop the growth of their cancers. It may also help researchers determine if giving radiation therapy to one tumor can stimulate the immune system to attack other tumors in the body that are not targeted by the radiation therapy.

    at UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well radiation therapy, paclitaxel, and carboplatin with or without trastuzumab work in treating patients with esophageal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving radiation therapy and combination chemotherapy together with or without trastuzumab is more effective in treating esophageal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • trūFreeze® Palliative Esophageal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Prospective, open label, non-controlled single arm, multi-center study The primary objective is to study the effects of the trūFreeze® Spray Cryotherapy System in a population of subjects who have been diagnosed with persistent local esophageal cancer and who are not surgical candidates or have completed or declined systemic therapy.

    at UC Irvine

  • Veliparib, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Liver or Kidney Dysfunction

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of veliparib when given together with paclitaxel and carboplatin in treating patients with solid tumors that are metastatic or cannot be removed by surgery and liver or kidney dysfunction. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving veliparib together with paclitaxel and carboplatin may kill more tumor cells.

    at UC Davis

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