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Germ Cell Tumor clinical trials at UC Health
13 in progress, 10 open to new patients

  • Active surveillance, chemotherapy in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors

    “How well does chemotherapy, (bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, or cisplatin), active surveillance work in patients with germ cell tumors?”

    open to eligible people ages up to 49 years

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies how well active surveillance, bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, or cisplatin work in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors. Active surveillance may help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors after their tumor is removed. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

    at UCSF UC Davis UCLA

  • Erdafitinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With FGFR Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well erdafitinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment with FGFR mutations. Erdafitinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

  • Larotrectinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With NTRK Fusions (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well larotrectinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with NTRK fusions that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. Larotrectinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Rare Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial enrolls participants for the following cohorts based on condition: 1. Epithelial tumors of nasal cavity, sinuses, nasopharynx: A) Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx and trachea (excluding laryngeal, nasopharyngeal cancer [NPC], and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck [SCCHN]) B) Adenocarcinoma and variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx. 2. Epithelial tumors of major salivary glands 3. Salivary gland type tumors of head and neck, lip, esophagus, stomach, trachea and lung, breast and other location 4. Undifferentiated carcinoma of gastrointestinal (GI) tract 5. Adenocarcinoma with variants of small intestine 6. Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of GI tract (stomach small intestine, colon, rectum, pancreas) 7. Fibromixoma and low grade mucinous adenocarcinoma (pseudomixoma peritonei) of the appendix and ovary 8. Rare pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma 9. Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma 10. Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and bile duct tumors 11. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of lung 12. Bronchoalveolar carcinoma lung. This condition is now also referred to as adenocarcinoma in situ, minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma. 13. Non-epithelial tumors of the ovary: A) Germ cell tumor of ovary B) Mullerian mixed tumor and adenosarcoma 14. Trophoblastic tumor: A) Choriocarcinoma 15. Transitional cell carcinoma other than that of the renal, pelvis, ureter, or bladder 16. Cell tumor of the testes and extragonadal germ tumors: A) Seminoma and testicular sex cord cancer B) Non seminomatous tumor C) Teratoma with malignant transformation 17. Epithelial tumors of penis - squamous adenocarcinoma cell carcinoma with variants of penis 18. Squamous cell carcinoma variants of the genitourinary (GU) system 19. Spindle cell carcinoma of kidney, pelvis, ureter 20. Adenocarcinoma with variants of GU system (excluding prostate cancer) 21. Odontogenic malignant tumors 22. Endocrine carcinoma of pancreas and digestive tract 23. Neuroendocrine carcinoma including carcinoid of the lung 24. Pheochromocytoma, malignant 25. Paraganglioma 26. Carcinomas of pituitary gland, thyroid gland parathyroid gland and adrenal cortex 27. Desmoid tumors 28. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors and NF1-related tumors 29. Malignant giant cell tumors 30. Chordoma 31. Adrenal cortical tumors 32. Tumor of unknown primary (Cancer of Unknown Primary; CuP) 33. Not Otherwise Categorized (NOC) Rare Tumors [To obtain permission to enroll in the NOC cohort, contact: S1609SC@swog.org] 34. Adenoid cystic carcinoma 35. Vulvar cancer 36. MetaPLASTIC carcinoma (of the breast) 37. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)

    at UC Irvine UCSD UC Davis

  • Olaparib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With Defects in DNA Damage Repair Genes (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well olaparib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with defects in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage repair genes that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

  • Palbociclib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rb Positive Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With Activating Alterations in Cell Cycle Genes (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well palbociclib works in treating patients with Rb positive solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with activating alterations (mutations) in cell cycle genes that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. Palbociclib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

  • PI3K/mTOR Inhibitor LY3023414 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With TSC or PI3K/MTOR Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well PI3K/mTOR inhibitor LY3023414 works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with TSC or PI3K/MTOR mutations that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. PI3K/mTOR inhibitor LY3023414 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Pediatric Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, or Histiocytic Disorders (The Pediatric MATCH Screening Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This Pediatric MATCH screening and multi-sub-study phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in pediatric patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, or histiocytic disorders that have progressed following at least one line of standard systemic therapy and/or for which no standard treatment exists that has been shown to prolong survival. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic changes or abnormalities (mutations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic mutation, and may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors or non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    at UCSF UCLA

  • Ulixertinib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With MAPK Pathway Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well ulixertinib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced), non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have a genetic alteration (mutation) in a signaling pathway called MAPK. A signaling pathway consists of a group of molecules in a cell that control one or more cell functions. Genes in the MAPK pathway are frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Ulixertinib may stop the growth of cancer cells that have mutations in the MAPK pathway.

    at UCSF

  • Vemurafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With BRAF V600 Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well vemurafenib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with BRAF V600 mutations that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. Vemurafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

  • Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed central nervous system germ cell tumors that have not spread to other parts of the brain, spinal canal, or body (localized). Drugs used as chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, etoposide, and ifosfamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.

    at UCSF

  • Tazemetostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With EZH2, SMARCB1, or SMARCA4 Gene Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well tazemetostat works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment and have EZH2, SMARCB1, or SMARCA4 gene mutations. Tazemetostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

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