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Sleep clinical trials at UC Health
5 in progress, 2 open to new patients

  • A Dyadic Sleep Intervention for Alzheimer's Disease Patients and Their Caregivers

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    Studies consistently show the negative health impact of sleep problems in both Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and their caregivers. However, only a few sleep interventions have been conducted for AD patients or their caregivers in community settings and none have addressed both members of the dyad concurrently. To fill these gaps, this study aims to develop a sleep intervention program specifically tailored for AD patient/caregiver dyads who both experience sleep difficulties.

    at UCLA

  • Cerebral MRI During Sleep

    open to eligible people ages 18-59

    Recent studies in animal models have suggested a critical role for cerebrospinal fluid and Interstitial fluid flux through cerebral parenchyma for removal of byproducts of cellular metabolism and hence in maintaining the health of the brain. This effect is modulated during sleep, suggesting a potentially important mechanism for sleep to maintain both acute homeostasis and long-term cerebral health. The central goal of these studies is to develop a sensitive MRI biomarker of cerebral conformational changes during sleep. This exploratory work aims to establish the sensitivity and reproducibility of MRI as a non-invasive neuroimaging assessment of cerebral changes during natural sleep and sedation.

    at UCSD

  • Freshman Sleep and Health Project

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Sleep is a clearly necessary neurobiologic process that influences innumerable aspects of basic daily functions, physical health, and mental well-being. Recent literature shows that college students across the country are experiencing high rates of sleep deprivation. Interestingly, some recent studies have implicated this sleep loss in contributing to weight gain that occurs in the first year of college, also known as the "freshman fifteen." Rates of depression and other mental health issues, which are closely connected to sleep disturbances, are also on the rise in college campuses. The majority of the sleep data obtained in this population has been via questionnaires and self report, and the studies usually include college students at all seniority levels (e.g., freshmen, sophomores, seniors). Here, the investigators outline a novel study investigating how sleep time changes in college freshman, and how it relates to multiple different aspects of their health and functioning over the course of one quarter. As technology has advanced, the ability to easily obtain objective measurements of different health parameters has increased dramatically. The investigators plan to use wireless actigraphy devices to measure sleep over a baseline seven day period in college-bound UCSD students prior to matriculation, and for 2 additional seven day periods during the first quarter of college. To the knowledge of the investigators, this is the first study to directly measure sleep time in college freshman in their normal environment. Effects of sleep time loss will be evaluated through multiple different metrics of physical and mental health. Given the recent link between sleep disturbances and weight gain in college freshman, the investigators will plan to measure weight changes prior to entering college and at two different time points through the first quarter. The investigators will use the PSQ-9 and GAD7 batteries as measures of mental health, obtained at the same time points as the sleep and weight information. As one of the primary consequences of sleep deprivation is on neurocognition in the daytime, the investigators plan to measure vigilant attention using psychomotor vigilance testing (PVT) as well. Screen time use has recently been targeted as a possible contributor to sleep loss in adolescents as well as adults and is something the investigators will attempt to measure as well using a smartphone application. Finally, this project will test the efficacy of a one hour sleep education intervention on improving total sleep time. To the knowledge of the investigators, no other studies have closely examined how total sleep time changes during the first year of college in freshman in relationship to weight and mental health parameters, nor has PVT been done in this context. Additionally, with the increasing concerns regarding screen time use in adolescents and young adults, this study provides prime opportunity to examine this issue in the context of sleep.

    at UCSD

  • Napping, Sleep, Cognitive Decline and Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study aimed to pilot test a non-pharmacological (behavioral) treatment program targeting improved cognition through improving 24-h sleep-wake cycle in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild Alzheimer's disease. A treatment program incorporating bright light therapy and a modified cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia will be developed to address 24-hour patterns of sleep. We will then pilot test its feasibility and explore its preliminary effects on improving sleep/napping and cognition in patients with MCI or mild Alzheimer's disease.

    at UCSF

  • The Effects of Manipulating Expectations in an Online Gratitude Intervention

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Gratitude - an emotion felt when an individual receives something beneficial from other people or entities - has been shown to positively affect well-being. Beginning in 2003, "count your blessings" interventions - in which participants list items they are grateful for, and gratitude letter writing interventions were designed to cultivate gratitude. Gratitude interventions have many positive outcomes; they can increase well-being and life satisfaction (Froh, Sefick, & Emmons, 2008) and increase self-esteem (Rash, Matsuba, & Prkachin, 2011) to name a few. Gratitude interventions have been replicated in different populations, such as with adolescents and clinical groups. Knowing the benefits of gratitude prior to an intervention could affect participant behavior and health outcomes. Past studies have illustrated that sharing information about treatments changes expectations and improves outcomes (Zion & Crum, 2018). For instance, overt medical treatments are more effective than hidden ones (Colloca, Lopiano, Lanotte, & Benedetti, 2004). The proposed study is designed to evaluate whether expectations about intervention efficacy can enhance the benefits of a brief gratitude intervention. Specifically, the investigators will test if providing information on the benefits of gratitude will enhance intervention outcomes. This 3-armed randomized controlled trial will have the following conditions: gratitude + expectation, gratitude, and events control. Participants will be undergraduate college students and the online intervention will last two weeks. Participants in the two gratitude conditions will login to an online form three times a week for two weeks and make entries of up to five things they are grateful for. The form for participants in the gratitude + expectation condition will also provide information about benefits of gratitude. An everyday events control will be used to provide a neutral comparison condition. This group will be instructed to type up to five things or events of note from their day on their form. Outcome measures will be collected via an online survey before and immediately after the intervention. The primary outcome is well-being and the secondary outcomes are sleep quality and quantity, state gratitude, positive affect, healthcare self-efficacy, stress, and depressive symptoms. The investigators predict that participants in the gratitude + expectation condition will have enhanced intervention outcomes compared to participants in comparison conditions.

    at UCLA

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