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Sleep clinical trials at UC Health
8 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

  • A Dyadic Sleep Intervention for Alzheimer's Disease Patients and Their Caregivers

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    Studies consistently show the negative health impact of sleep problems in both Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and their caregivers. However, only a few sleep interventions have been conducted for AD patients or their caregivers in community settings and none have addressed both members of the dyad concurrently. To fill these gaps, this study aims to develop a sleep intervention program specifically tailored for AD patient/caregiver dyads who both experience sleep difficulties.

    at UCLA

  • Social Experiences and Sleep Study

    open to eligible people ages 18-62

    This study will test the effect of race-based social rejection on polysomnography derived sleep outcomes and nocturnal cardiovascular psychophysiology in a sample of 80 African Americans and 80 Caucasian Americans. The investigators will test group differences on these outcomes as well as within subjects by testing impact of rejection compared to a non-rejection control night in the sleep laboratory.

    at UCSF

  • The Impact of 8 Weeks of Digital Meditation Application and Healthy Eating Program on Work Stress and Health Outcomes

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The aim of the present study is to test the effects of a digital meditation intervention and/or a healthy eating intervention in a sample of UCSF employees with overweight and obesity (BMI>=25kg/m2) who report mild to moderate stress. We will randomize UCSF employees to 8-weeks of a digital meditation intervention (using the commercially available application, Headspace), a healthy eating intervention, a digital meditation+healthy eating intervention, or a waitlist control condition.

    at UCSF

  • Autonomic Mechanisms of Sleep-dependent Memory Consolidation

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The goal of the proposed project is to identify the impact vagal activity during sleep for memory formation. Nearly 100 years of research contends that sleep plays a critical role in memory consolidation (i.e. the transformation of recent experiences into stable, long-term memories), yet much of this literature has focused on the central nervous system and technologies like electroencephalography (EEG) to unpack neural correlates involved in memory processing. Sleep is also a unique period of autonomic variation and an expansive literature has indicated the critical importance of the autonomic nervous system for memory formation. This project would be amongst the first to examine the autonomic nervous system during sleep as a critical, causal pathway linking sleep to memory processing. The investigators will assess the impact of non-invasive, transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulation on sleep and post-sleep memory performance. Autonomic physiology, including electrocardiography and impedance cardiography, will be gathered at baseline, before the memory task and continuously during sleep to examine vagal tone (i.e. heart rate variability) and sympathetic activation (i.e. pre-ejection period) in response to both active and sham stimulation conditions. Polysomnography will also be gathered during the nap to examine sleep architecture. The proposed research will address a critical gap in the literature by: 1) examining the causal role of the ANS for memory functioning in humans, 2) extending the current understanding of sleep's impact on memory processing, and 3) set the groundwork for novel, sleep-based interventions with the goal of improving cognitive health.

    at UCSF

  • Freshman Sleep and Health Project

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Sleep is a clearly necessary neurobiologic process that influences innumerable aspects of basic daily functions, physical health, and mental well-being. Recent literature shows that college students across the country are experiencing high rates of sleep deprivation. Interestingly, some recent studies have implicated this sleep loss in contributing to weight gain that occurs in the first year of college, also known as the "freshman fifteen." Rates of depression and other mental health issues, which are closely connected to sleep disturbances, are also on the rise in college campuses. The majority of the sleep data obtained in this population has been via questionnaires and self report, and the studies usually include college students at all seniority levels (e.g., freshmen, sophomores, seniors). Here, the investigators outline a novel study investigating how sleep time changes in college freshman, and how it relates to multiple different aspects of their health and functioning over the course of one quarter. As technology has advanced, the ability to easily obtain objective measurements of different health parameters has increased dramatically. The investigators plan to use wireless actigraphy devices to measure sleep over a baseline seven day period in college-bound UCSD students prior to matriculation, and for 2 additional seven day periods during the first quarter of college. To the knowledge of the investigators, this is the first study to directly measure sleep time in college freshman in their normal environment. Effects of sleep time loss will be evaluated through multiple different metrics of physical and mental health. Given the recent link between sleep disturbances and weight gain in college freshman, the investigators will plan to measure weight changes prior to entering college and at two different time points through the first quarter. The investigators will use the PSQ-9 and GAD7 batteries as measures of mental health, obtained at the same time points as the sleep and weight information. As one of the primary consequences of sleep deprivation is on neurocognition in the daytime, the investigators plan to measure vigilant attention using psychomotor vigilance testing (PVT) as well. Screen time use has recently been targeted as a possible contributor to sleep loss in adolescents as well as adults and is something the investigators will attempt to measure as well using a smartphone application. Finally, this project will test the efficacy of a one hour sleep education intervention on improving total sleep time. To the knowledge of the investigators, no other studies have closely examined how total sleep time changes during the first year of college in freshman in relationship to weight and mental health parameters, nor has PVT been done in this context. Additionally, with the increasing concerns regarding screen time use in adolescents and young adults, this study provides prime opportunity to examine this issue in the context of sleep.

    at UCSD

  • Napping, Sleep, Cognitive Decline and Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study aimed to pilot test a non-pharmacological (behavioral) treatment program targeting improved cognition through improving 24-h sleep-wake cycle in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild Alzheimer's disease. A treatment program incorporating bright light therapy and a modified cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia will be developed to address 24-hour patterns of sleep. We will then pilot test its feasibility and explore its preliminary effects on improving sleep/napping and cognition in patients with MCI or mild Alzheimer's disease.

    at UCSF

  • Summertime: Kids in Motion

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is a 3-week randomized crossover study to determine the effect of the prior night's sleep duration on energy-balance related behaviors of diet and physical activity the following day. In Week 1, child participants will sleep their usual amount. In week 2, participants will be randomized to either a sleep restricted or a healthy sleep condition for 4 nights. In week 3, participants will cross over to the opposite sleep condition for 4 nights.

    at UCSF

  • Transoral Daytime Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation in Patients With Simple Snoring

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB) is a spectrum of conditions spanning from Simple Snoring to Severe Sleep apnea. SDB has multiple underlying mechanisms. Some portion of patients have issues with upper airway dilator muscle control; and such patients may be amenable to upper airway muscle training exercises using neuromuscular stimulation techniques. The investigators and others have published on the topic of neuromyopathy in the upper airway, defining a subgroup of OSA patients who may be amenable to training exercises. Based on this background, the investigators seek to test the hypothesis that upper airway tongue muscle training using transoral surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation may have benefits to patients with Simple Snoring.

    at UCSD

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