Skip to main content

Colon Cancer clinical trials at University of California Health

25 in progress, 14 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Dose Escalation Study of SHP2 Inhibitor in Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring KRAS of EGFR Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 1 dose escalation study in patients with advanced solid tumors harboring KRAS or EGFR mutations to determine the maximum tolerated dose and recommended Phase II dose of HBI-2376 and characterize its pharmacokinetic profile.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of Selpercatinib (LOXO-292) in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors, RET Fusion-Positive Solid Tumors, and Medullary Thyroid Cancer (LIBRETTO-001)

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This is an open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and preliminary anti-tumor activity of selpercatinib (also known as LOXO-292) administered orally to participants with advanced solid tumors, including rearranged during transfection (RET)-fusion-positive solid tumors, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and other tumors with RET activation.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • A Trial of RSC-1255 for Treatment of Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    RSC-101 is a Phase 1a/1b clinical trial of RSC-1255 in adult study participants with advanced solid tumor malignancies who are intolerant of existing therapies known to provide clinical benefit, have disease that has progressed after standard therapy, or have previously failed other therapies. The study has two phases. The purpose of Phase 1a (Dose Escalation) is to confirm the appropriate treatment dose and Phase 1b (Dose Expansion) is to characterize the safety and efficacy of RSC-1255.

    at UC Davis UCLA

  • Circulating Tumor DNA Testing in Predicting Treatment for Patients With Stage IIA Colon Cancer After Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies how well circulating tumor deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) testing in the blood works in predicting treatment for patients with stage IIA colon cancer after surgery. ctDNA are circulating tumor cells that are shed by tumors into the blood. Finding ctDNA in the blood means that there is very likely some small amounts of cancer that remain after surgery. However, this cancer, if detected, cannot be found on other tests usually used to find cancer, as it is too small. Testing for ctDNA levels may help identify patients with colon cancer after surgery who do benefit, and those who do not benefit, from receiving chemotherapy.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSF

  • Duloxetine to Prevent Chemo-Induced Numbness & Tingling in Stage II-III Colon Cancer

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 25 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies the best dose of duloxetine and how well it works in preventing pain, tingling, and numbness (peripheral neuropathy) caused by treatment with oxaliplatin in patients with stage II-III colorectal cancer. Duloxetine increases the amount of certain chemicals in the brain that help relieve depression and pain. Giving duloxetine in patients undergoing treatment with oxaliplatin for colorectal cancer may help prevent peripheral neuropathy.

    at UC Davis

  • Enhancing Electronic Health Systems to Decrease the Burden of Colon Cancer, Lung Cancer, Obesity, Vaccine-Preventable Illness, and LivER Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 50-80

    The purpose of CLOVER is to utilize Epic Healthy Planet to increase adherence to United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations in adults age 50 and older.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Experimental PET Imaging Scans Before Cancer Surgery to Study the Amount of PET Tracer Accumulated in Normal and Cancer Tissues

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies a new imaging technique called FAPi PET/CT to determine where and to which degree the FAPI tracer (68Ga-FAPi-46) accumulate in normal and cancer tissues in patients with non-prostate cancer. The research team also want to know whether what they see on PET/CT images represents the tumor tissue being excised from the patient's body. The research team is also interested to investigate another new imaging technique called PSMA PET/CT. Participants will be invited to undergo a second PET/CT scan, with the PSMA tracer (68Ga-PSMA-11). This is not required but just an option for volunteer patients. Patients can decide to have only the FAPI PET/CT scan. The PET/CT scanner combines the PET and the CT scanners into a single device. This device combines the anatomic (body structure) information provided by the CT scan with the metabolic information obtained from the PET scan. PET is an established imaging technique that utilizes small amounts of radioactivity attached to very minimal amounts of, in the case of this research, 68Ga-PSMA-11 and 68Ga-FAPi. Because some cancers take up 68Ga-PSMA-11 and/or 68Ga-FAPi it can be seen with PET. CT utilizes x-rays that traverse the body from the outside. CT images provide an exact outline of organs where it occurs in patient's body. FAP stands for Fibroblast Activation Protein. FAP is produced by cells that surround tumors. The function of FAP is not well understood but imaging studies have shown that FAP can be detected with FAPI PET/CT. Imaging FAP with FAPI PET/CT may in the future provide additional information about various cancers. PSMA stands for Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen. This name is incorrect as PSMA is also found in many other cancers. The function of PSMA is not well understood but imaging studies have shown that PSMA can be detected with PET in many non-prostate cancers. Imaging FAP with PET/CT may in the future provide additional information about various cancers.

    at UCLA

  • Five or Ten Year Colonoscopy for 1-2 Non-Advanced Adenomatous Polyps

    open to eligible people ages 50-70

    This trial examines colorectal cancer incidence in participants with 1 to 2 non-advanced adenomas randomized to surveillance colonoscopy at 10 years compared to participants randomized to surveillance colonoscopy at 5 and 10 years.

    at UCLA

  • Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity for Colorectal Cancer Survivors (Tools To Be Fit)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the effect of four different intervention components "tools" on body weight, nutrition, and physical activity in colorectal cancer survivors. Studies indicate that people with colorectal cancer whose nutrition and physical activity habits are consistent with the American Cancer Society's Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines may have longer disease-free survival. The four different intervention components may help patients with colon or rectal cancer adopt recommended health behaviors after they have completed treatment.

    at UCSF

  • Study of ctDNA Guided Change in Tx for Refractory Minimal Residual Disease in Colon Adenocarcinomas

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 1b, prospective, single arm, non-randomized, open-label clinical trial determining the efficacy of adjuvant trifluridine and tipiracil (TAS-102) in combination with irinotecan in patients with ctDNA positive colon adenocarcinoma.

    at UC Irvine

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

  • Testing the Combination of Two Anti-Cancer Drugs for Treating Advanced Solid Tumors with HER2 Expression

    “Volunteer for the DASH Trial and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The dose escalation phase of this trial identifies the best dose and safety of ceralasertib (AZD6738) when given in combination with trastuzumab deruxtecan (DS-8201a) in treating patients with solid tumors that have a change (mutation) in the HER2 gene or protein and have spread to other places in the body (advanced). The dose expansion phase (phase Ib) of this trial compares how colorectal and gastroesophageal cancers with HER2 mutation respond to treatment with a combination of ceralasertib and trastuzumab deruxtecan versus trastuzumab deruxtecan alone. Trastuzumab deruxtecan is a monoclonal antibody, called trastuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug, called deruxtecan. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers deruxtecan to kill them. Ceralasertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis

  • Genetic Testing in Screening Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Colon or Rectal Cancer for a COLOMATE Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial screens patients with colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) for genetic mutations for recommendation to a molecularly assigned therapy. Identifying gene mutations may help patients enroll onto target companion trials that target these mutations.

    at UCSD

  • Prevention of Colorectal Cancer Through Multiomics Blood Testing

    open to eligible people ages 45-85

    The PREEMPT CRC study is a prospective multi-center observational study to validate a blood-based test for the early detection of colorectal cancer by collecting blood samples from average-risk participants who will undergo a routine screening colonoscopy.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • A Phase 2 Study of NIR178 in Combination With PDR001 in Patients With Solid Tumors and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this phase 2 study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of NIR178 in combination with PDR001 in multiple solid tumors and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and further explore schedule variations of NIR178 to optimize immune activation through inhibition of A2aR.

    at UCLA

  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer and Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy and atezolizumab to see how well it works compared with combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with stage III colon cancer and deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy with atezolizumab may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with colon cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Encorafenib, Binimetinib, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Microsatellite Stable BRAF V600E Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and how well encorafenib, binimetinib, and nivolumab work in treating patients with microsatellite stable, BRAFV600E gene-mutated colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Encorafenib and binimetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving encorafenib, binimetinib, and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer compared to standard treatments.

    at UCSF

  • Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Surgery for Stage II Colon Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and bevacizumab to see how well they work compared to oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil in treating patients who have undergone surgery for stage II colon cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving combination chemotherapy together with bevacizumab is more effective than combination chemotherapy alone in treating colon cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil With or Without Celecoxib in Treating Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying giving oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil together to compare how well they work when given together with or without celecoxib in treating patients with stage III colon cancer previously treated with surgery. RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Celecoxib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil is more effective with or without celecoxib in treating colon cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSF

  • Panitumumab, Regorafenib, or TAS-102, in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Unresectable RAS Wild-Type Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well retreatment with panitumumab works compared to standard of care regorafenib or trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (TAS-102) in treating patients with colorectal cancer that is negative for RAS wild-type colorectal cancer has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), and/or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), and is negative for resistance mutations in blood. Treatment with panitumumab may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Some tumors need growth factors to keep growing. Growth factor antagonists, such as regorafenib, may interfere with the growth factor and stop the tumor from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as TAS-102, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer than with the usual treatment of regorafenib or TAS-102.

    at UCSD

  • Phase 1/2 Study of the Highly-selective RET Inhibitor, Pralsetinib (BLU-667), in Participants With Thyroid Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Other Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1/2, open-label, first-in-human (FIH) study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary antineoplastic activity of pralsetinib (BLU-667) administered orally in participants with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), RET-altered NSCLC and other RET-altered solid tumors.

    at UC Irvine

  • PrehabPal: A Digital Tool to Help Older Adults Prepare for Cancer Surgery

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is a multi-center, randomized trial investigating the use of PrehabPal web app versus a written surgery prehabilitation instructions among individuals aged 65 years and older preparing for colon cancer surgery. PrehabPal is a web app designed with, and for, older adults preparing for surgery at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). This app has the potential to fill a crucial clinical gap for older cancer patients by designing an individualized prehabilitation program and providing prehabilitation coaching.

    at UCSF

  • S1613, Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab or Cetuximab and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2/Neu Amplified Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2/neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Savolitinib in Treating Patients With MET Amplified Metastatic or Unresectable Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well savolitinib works in treating patients with MET amplified colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Savolitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis

  • Expanded Access for the Treatment of Cancers With Rearranged During Transfection (RET) Activation

    Sorry, not accepting new patients

    Expanded access for participants with cancer with RET activation who are ineligible for an ongoing selpercatinib (also known as LOXO-292) clinical trial or have other considerations that prevent access to selpercatinib through an existing clinical trial. The treating physician/investigator contacts Lilly when, based on their medical opinion, a patient meets the criteria for inclusion in the expanded access program.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

Our lead scientists for Colon Cancer research studies include .

Last updated: