Skip to main content

Colon Cancer clinical trials at UC Health
18 in progress, 11 open to new patients

  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer and Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy and atezolizumab to see how well it works compared with combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with stage III colon cancer and deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy with atezolizumab may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with colon cancer.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Experimental Medicine (Transuzumab and Pertuzunab) in Advanced Colorectal Cancer with Genetic Component

    “Help us examine how well experimental drugs work compared to standard-use drugs in treating colorectal cancer.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2/neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Expressing Personalized Tumor Antigens Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 1, open-label, uncontrolled, multicenter study in 3 distinct solid tumors. The study design is dose-escalation/de-escalation using a standard 3 + 3 design to evaluate the safety profile of ADXS-NEO, to select a recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), and identify initial signs of clinical activity in each of the 3 tumor-specific cohorts.

    at UCLA

  • Oxaliplatin Microdosing Assay in Predicting Exposure and Sensitivity to Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well carbon C 14 oxaliplatin microdosing assay works in predicting exposure and sensitivity to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Carbon C 14 is a radioactive form of carbon, exists in nature and in the body at a low level. Microdose carbon C 14 oxaliplatin diagnostic assay may help doctors understand how well patients respond to treatment and develop individualize oxaliplatin dosing in patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Phase 1 Study of the Highly-selective RET Inhibitor BLU-667 in Patients With Thyroid Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Other Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1, open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary antineoplastic activity of BLU-667 administered orally in patients with medullary thyroid cancer, RET-altered NSCLC and other RET-altered solid tumors.

    at UC Irvine

  • Phase 1/2 Study of LOXO-292 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, RET Fusion-Positive Solid Tumors, and Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This is a Phase 1/2, open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and preliminary anti-tumor activity of LOXO-292 administered orally to patients with advanced solid tumors, including RET-fusion-positive solid tumors, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and other tumors with RET activation.

    at UCLA UCSF UCSD

  • Safety Study of MGD009 in B7-H3-expressing Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of MGD009 when given to patients with B7-H3-expressing tumors. The study will also evaluate what is the highest dose of MGD009 that can be given safely. Assessments will be done to see how the drug acts in the body (pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and to evaluate potential anti-tumor activity of MGD009.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Self-monitoring and Reminder Texts to Increase Physical Activity After Cancer II

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    There is a critical need for physical activity interventions in CRC. The investigators have developed a digital health physical activity intervention, Smart Pace, which includes a wearable tracker (Fitbit) and text messaging and aims to have patients build up to 150 min/wk of moderate activity. In this study, the investigators propose to expand and improve Smart Pace, including: 1) enrolling patients during chemotherapy; 2) tailoring text messages to individual preferences and treatment timing; and 3) adding resources to support home-based exercise. The study is a 12-week pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the feasibility of this novel digital health physical activity intervention among 48 CRC patients on chemotherapy. The specific aims are to: 1) Determine the feasibility of the intervention via adherence and attrition, and determine the acceptability of the intervention via questionnaires and semi-structured interviews . 2) Estimate the effect of the intervention vs. usual care on physical activity, QOL, and symptoms at 12-weeks . And 3) Explore the impact of the intervention vs. usual care on fitness, weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure at 12-weeks.

    at UCSF

  • Survivor Choices for Eating and Drinking - Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Epidemiologic data suggest that a Western dietary pattern after diagnosis of colorectal cancer increases risk of disease recurrence and death. High intake of red and processed meat, dairy, refined grains, and sweets/desserts characterize a 'Western dietary pattern'. This study aims to translate the epidemiologic findings into a patient-centered, web-based dietary intervention with text messaging to inform and modify users' dietary choices. The investigators' specific aims are to: 1) Develop a web-based dietary intervention with text messaging for colorectal cancer survivors; and 2) Conduct a 12-week pilot randomized controlled trial to determine the acceptability and feasibility of the dietary intervention among 50 colorectal cancer survivors. All participants will receive standard of care print materials regarding diet following a colorectal cancer diagnosis. Participants in the intervention group will also receive access to a web-based dietary intervention with text messaging for 12 weeks. This study will generate preliminary data on the effect of the intervention on dietary choices among colorectal cancer survivors for future studies.

    at UCSF

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UC Davis

  • Tas-102 and Radioembolization With 90Y Resin Microspheres for Chemo-refractory Colorectal Liver Metastases

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase I dose escalation study (3+3 design) with a dose expansion arm (12 patients) designed to evaluate safety of the combination of Tas-102 and radioembolization using Yttrium-90 (90Y) resin microspheres for patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver-dominant chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

    at UCSF

  • A Prospective Study for the Assessment of Recurrence Risk in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients Using ColoPrint

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The aim of this study is to enroll 785 eligible stage II colon cancer patients in order to validate the performance of ColoPrint in estimating 3-year relapse rate. Secondary objectives include comparing the objective risk assessment results from the prognostic profile (ColoPrint) to both the risk assessment based on the ASCO criteria, as well as the Investigator's independent assessment. As this is the first prospective study of ColoPrint, this study will also address the logistics and quality assurance of using ColoPrint in clinical practice. Patient treatment is at the discretion of the physician, adhering to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN)-approved regimens or a recognized alternative. The enrollment period will be 6 years. It is expected that 1800 to 2400 patients will be enrolled in order to obtain 785 analysable stage II samples from eligible patients. Approximately 25-35 clinical sites will be involved worldwide. The statistical analysis will be performed by Agendia and an independent research institute or hospital. Study Design Extension Study: This will be a prospective study to measure the impact of ColoPrint on adjuvant treatment in stage 2 colorectal cancer patients. After surgery the tumor sample will be shipped in RNA Retain to Agendia. The online Clinical Report Form (CRF) 0 will be completed to document if the patient fulfils the inclusion criteria. Baseline clinical data and the patient and physician chemotherapy intention, patient's perceived recurrence risk and decisional conflict without knowing the ColoPrint result will be entered in CRF 1. After completion of CRF1 the ColoPrint result is released. CRF2 will be completed after the final treatment decision has been made. This CRF will capture the patient and physician chemotherapy intention, patient's perceived recurrence risk and decisional conflict, impact of ColoPrint and the actual treatment the patient will receive. CRF3 will be completed 12 months after enrolment and will capture the patient status, patient's perceived recurrence risk and decisional conflict. CRF4 and 5 will be completed 3 and 5 years after surgery and will capture the patient status. A sample size of 210 stage 2 colon cancer patients is required to detect a 10% overall treatment change (5% significance and 90% power). Reporting of the Results: Blinded Study; The ColoPrint results will not be reported to the physician and/or patient at the time of enrolment. All samples will be stored in a freezer until 550-575 eligible stage II patients have been enrolled. Samples will then be analyzed in one batch in a blinded fashion from the clinical results. Extension Study; The ColoPrint results will be reported to the physician and patient after CRF1 has been completed.

    at UC Davis

  • Akt Inhibitor GSK2141795, Dabrafenib, and Trametinib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Cancer

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of Akt inhibitor GSK2141795 when given together with dabrafenib and trametinib and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage IIIC-IV cancer. Akt inhibitor GSK2141795, dabrafenib, and trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving Akt inhibitor GSK2141795 with dabrafenib and trametinib may be a better treatment for cancer.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Dose Finding Study of Once or Twice Weekly IMMU-130 in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase I/II, open-label study of IMMU-130 administered in 21-day treatment cycles, once or twice weekly for 2 consecutive weeks followed by one week of rest to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have been previously treated with at least one prior irinotecan-containing regimen. The study is being done to evaluate whether the study drug is safe and tolerable at different dose levels with these dosing schedules and to obtain preliminary information on its efficacy.

    at UCLA

  • Glucagon and Colonoscopy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators believe that glucagon therapy will have a positive impact on key parameters of colonoscopy such as cecal intubation time, withdrawal time, total procedure time, adenoma detection rate, endoscopist's assessment of the difficulty of the procedure, patient comfort, and patient's willingness to undergo a repeat colonoscopy.

    at UCSF

  • Irinotecan and Alisertib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of alisertib when given together with irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with advanced solid tumors or colorectal cancer. Irinotecan hydrochloride and alisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis

  • Mailed FIT Outreach to Improve Colon Cancer Screening in the Safety-net System

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Uptake of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is suboptimal in the San Francisco Health Network and access to care may be limited so novel models of health care delivery are warranted. The objective of this study is to examine whether a centralized panel management model with mailed fecal immunochemical test (FIT) will be effective at increasing the uptake of CRC screening and could be developed and sustained within the typical parameters of cost-effectiveness and budget impact analyses.

    at UCSF

  • Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Surgery for Stage II Colon Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and bevacizumab to see how well they work compared to oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil in treating patients who have undergone surgery for stage II colon cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving combination chemotherapy together with bevacizumab is more effective than combination chemotherapy alone in treating colon cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

Last updated: