Skip to main content

Colorectal Tumor clinical trials at University of California Health

85 in progress, 44 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Dose Escalation Study of SHP2 Inhibitor in Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring KRAS of EGFR Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 1 dose escalation study in patients with advanced solid tumors harboring KRAS or EGFR mutations to determine the maximum tolerated dose and recommended Phase II dose of HBI-2376 and characterize its pharmacokinetic profile.

    at UCLA

  • A Phase 1b Trial of ATRC-101 in Adults With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    ATRC-101-A01 is a Phase 1b, open-label dose escalation and expansion trial of ATRC-101, an engineered fully human immunoglobulin G, subclass 1 (IgG1) antibody derived from a naturally occurring human antibody. The safety, tolerability, PK, and biological activity of ATRC-101 will be characterized when administered every two weeks (Q2W) or every 3 weeks (Q3W) as a monotherapy or in combination with other anticancer agents.

    at UCLA

  • A Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Targeted Therapies in Subpopulations of Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (INTRINSIC)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This open-label, exploratory study is designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of targeted therapies or immunotherapy as single agents or combinations, in participants with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) whose tumors are biomarker positive as per treatment arm-specific definition. Eligible participants with mCRC will be enrolled into specific treatment arms based on their biomarker assay results.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of a Patient-Specific Neoantigen Vaccine in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Blockade for Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objective of the Phase 2 portion of the study is to characterize the clinical activity of maintenance therapy with GRT-C901/GRT-R902 (patient-specific vaccines) in combination with checkpoint inhibitors in addition to fluoropyrimidine/bevacizumab versus a fluoropyrimidine/bevacizumab alone as assessed by changes in circulating tumor (ct)DNA. The primary objective of the Phase 3 portion is to demonstrate clinical efficacy of the regimen as assessed by progression-free survival.

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • A Study of E7386 in Combination With Pembrolizumab in Previously Treated Participants With Selected Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The Phase 1b part of this study is conducted to assess the safety and tolerability of E7386 in combination with pembrolizumab in participants with previously treated selected solid tumors, and to determine the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of E7386 in combination with pembrolizumab. The Phase 2 part of this study is conducted to assess the objective response rate (ORR) of E7386 in combination with pembrolizumab in participants with previously treated selected solid tumors (melanoma, colorectal cancer [CRC], hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC]) according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of ELI-002 in Subjects With KRAS Mutated Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and Other Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1 study to assess the safety and efficacy of ELI-002 immunotherapy (a lipid-conjugated immune-stimulatory oligonucleotide [Amph-CpG-7909] plus a mixture of lipid-conjugated peptide-based antigens [Amph-Peptides]) as adjuvant treatment of minimal residual disease (MRD) in subjects with KRAS/neuroblastoma ras viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) mutated PDAC or other solid tumors.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of ERAS-007 in Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18-99

    To evaluate the safety and tolerability of escalating doses of ERAS-007 in combination with other cancer therapies in study participants with advanced GI malignancies. - To determine the Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) and/or Recommended Dose (RD) of ERAS-007 administered in combination with other cancer therapies. - To evaluate the antitumor activity of ERAS-007 in combination with other cancer therapies. - To evaluate the PK profiles of ERAS-007 and other cancer therapies when administered in combination.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • A Study of NBF-006 in Non-Small Cell Lung, Pancreatic, or Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, non-controlled study conducted in two parts - Part A (dose escalation) followed by Part B (dose expansion).

    at UCSD

  • A Study of RGX-202-01 as Combination Therapy in 2nd Line RAS Mutant Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    RGX-202-001 is a Phase 1, first-in-human, dose escalation and expansion study of RGX-202-01 as a single agent and in combination with FOLFIRI +/- bevacizumab. RGX-202-01 is a small molecule inhibitor of the creatine transporter SLC6a8, a novel metabolic target that drives gastrointestinal cancer progression. During the dose escalation stage, multiple doses of orally administered RGX-202-01 with or without FOLFIRI +/- bevacizumab (single agent or combination therapy) will be evaluated in patients with advanced gastrointestinal tumors (i.e., locally advanced and unresectable, or metastatic) who have had PD on available standard systemic therapies or for which there are no standard systemic therapies of relevant clinical impact. In the expansion stage: Patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) RAS Mutant will be treated at the optimal dose.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of Select Drug Combinations in Adult Patients With Advanced/Metastatic BRAF V600 Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A phase Ib, open-label platform study of select drug combinations chosen in order to characterize safety and tolerability of each treatment arm tested and to identify recommended doses and regimens for future studies.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of Selpercatinib (LOXO-292) in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors, RET Fusion-Positive Solid Tumors, and Medullary Thyroid Cancer (LIBRETTO-001)

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This is an open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and preliminary anti-tumor activity of selpercatinib (also known as LOXO-292) administered orally to participants with advanced solid tumors, including rearranged during transfection (RET)-fusion-positive solid tumors, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and other tumors with RET activation.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • A Study of SGN-STNV in Advanced Solid Tumors

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial will look at a drug called SGN-STNV to find out whether it is safe for patients with solid tumors. It will study SGN-STNV to find out what its side effects are. A side effect is anything the drug does besides treating cancer. It will also study how well SGN-STNV works to treat solid tumors. The study will have two parts. Part A of the study will find out how much SGN-STNV should be given to patients. Part B will use the dose found in Part A to find out how safe SGN-STNV is and if it works to treat certain types of solid tumors.

    at UCSF

  • A Study of XmAb®23104 in Subjects With Selected Advanced Solid Tumors (DUET-3)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1, multiple dose, ascending dose escalation study to define a MTD/RD and regimen of XmAb23104, to describe safety and tolerability, to assess PK and immunogenicity, and to preliminarily assess anti-tumor activity of XmAb23104 monotherapy and combination therapy with ipilimumab in subjects with selected advanced solid tumors.

    at UCSD

  • A Study to Evaluate the Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Activity of GDC-6036 Alone or in Combination in Participants With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors With a KRAS G12C Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase I dose-escalation and dose-expansion study that will evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and preliminary activity of GDC-6036 in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors with a KRAS G12C mutation.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UCSF

  • Circulating Tumor DNA Testing in Predicting Treatment for Patients With Stage IIA Colon Cancer After Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies how well circulating tumor deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) testing in the blood works in predicting treatment for patients with stage IIA colon cancer after surgery. ctDNA are circulating tumor cells that are shed by tumors into the blood. Finding ctDNA in the blood means that there is very likely some small amounts of cancer that remain after surgery. However, this cancer, if detected, cannot be found on other tests usually used to find cancer, as it is too small. Testing for ctDNA levels may help identify patients with colon cancer after surgery who do benefit, and those who do not benefit, from receiving chemotherapy.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSF

  • Dose Escalation and Dose Expansion Study of RMC-6291 Monotherapy in Subjects With Advanced KRASG12C Mutant Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of escalating doses of RMC-6291 (KRAS G12C(ON) inhibitor) monotherapy in adult subjects with advanced solid tumors and to identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and the recommended Phase 2 dose.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Duloxetine to Prevent Chemo-Induced Numbness & Tingling in Stage II-III Colon Cancer

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 25 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies the best dose of duloxetine and how well it works in preventing pain, tingling, and numbness (peripheral neuropathy) caused by treatment with oxaliplatin in patients with stage II-III colorectal cancer. Duloxetine increases the amount of certain chemicals in the brain that help relieve depression and pain. Giving duloxetine in patients undergoing treatment with oxaliplatin for colorectal cancer may help prevent peripheral neuropathy.

    at UC Davis

  • Efficacy and Safety Study of Tisotumab Vedotin for Patients With Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial will study tisotumab vedotin to find out whether it is an effective treatment for certain solid tumors and what side effects (unwanted effects) may occur. There are four parts to this study. - In Part A, the treatment will be given to participants every 3 weeks (3-week cycles). - In Part B, participants will receive tisotumab vedotin on Days 1, 8, and 15 every 4-week cycle. - In Part C, participants may receive tisotumab vedotin on Days 1 and 15 or Days 1, 8, and 15 on a 4-week cycle. - In Part D, participants will be given treatment on Day 1 of every 3-week cycle. Participants in Part D will get tisotumab vedotin with either: - Pembrolizumab or, - Pembrolizumab and carboplatin, or - Pembrolizumab and cisplatin

    at UC Davis

  • Enhancing Electronic Health Systems to Decrease the Burden of Colon Cancer, Lung Cancer, Obesity, Vaccine-Preventable Illness, and LivER Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 50-80

    The purpose of CLOVER is to utilize Epic Healthy Planet to increase adherence to United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations in adults age 50 and older.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Experimental Radiotracer Imaging Study for Cancer Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the side effects of 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide and how well it works in imaging patients with primary or cancer that has spread to the breast, colorectal, lung, or pancreatic. Radiotracers, such as 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide, may improve the ability to locate cancer in the body.

    at UC Davis

  • GCC19CART for Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Study ICT-GCC19CART-US-001 (CARAPIA-1) is a Phase 1 study evaluating the safety, tolerability, clinical activity, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of GCC19CART in subjects with relapsed or refractory metastatic colorectal cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity for Colorectal Cancer Survivors (Tools To Be Fit)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the effect of four different intervention components "tools" on body weight, nutrition, and physical activity in colorectal cancer survivors. Studies indicate that people with colorectal cancer whose nutrition and physical activity habits are consistent with the American Cancer Society's Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines may have longer disease-free survival. The four different intervention components may help patients with colon or rectal cancer adopt recommended health behaviors after they have completed treatment.

    at UCSF

  • Interactive Survivorship Program for the Improvement of Healthcare Resources in Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors, INSPIRE-AYA Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial studies how well an interactive survivorship program works in improving healthcare resources in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors. By improving access to survivorship resources, health literacy, self-management skills, and support, an interactive survivorship program may help to improve adherence to adolescent and young adult healthcare guidelines and reduce cancer-related distress.

    at UCLA

  • LYT-200 Alone and in Combination With Chemotherapy or Tislelizumab in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 1/2 Open-label, Multi-center Study of the Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Anti-tumor Activity of LYT-200 Alone and in Combination with Chemotherapy or Tislelizumab in Patients with Metastatic Solid Tumors

    at UCLA

  • Pembrolizumab Plus Lenvatinib in Combination With Belzutifan in Solid Tumors (MK-6482-016)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of belzutifan in combination with pembrolizumab and lenvatinib in multiple solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), biliary tract cancer (BTC), endometrial cancer (EC),and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). There is no formal hypothesis testing in this study.

    at UCSF

  • Performance of SGM-101 for the Delineation of Primary and Recurrent Tumor and Metastases in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The performance of SGM-101, an intraoperative imaging agent, will be compared to that of standard "white light" visualization during surgical resections of colorectal cancer.

    at UCSD

  • Phase 2 Study of DKN-01 in Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 2 randomized, open-label, two-part, multicenter study with a safety run-in to evaluate efficacy and safety of DKN-01 plus FOLFIRI/FOLFOX and bevacizumab versus standard of care (SOC) [FOLFIRI/FOLFOX and bevacizumab] as second-line treatment of advanced CRC patients.

    at UCLA

  • Preoperative Immunotherapy (Pembrolizumab) for Patients With Colorectal Cancer and Resectable Hepatic Metastases

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trials studies how well pembrolizumab and vactosertib work after standard of care chemotherapy in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver that can be removed by surgery (resectable hepatic metastases). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vactosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and vactosertib after standard of care chemotherapy, but before liver metastases surgery, may help shrink the cancer prior to surgery. This study also investigates pembrolizumab and vactosertib after liver metastases surgery, decrease the risk of the cancer recurring (coming back).

    at UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Metastatic Gastrointestinal Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy works for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer that are spreading to other places in the body (metastatic). Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. This trial is being done to determine if giving radiation therapy to patients who are being treated with immunotherapy and whose cancers are progressing (getting worse) can slow or stop the growth of their cancers. It may also help researchers determine if giving radiation therapy to one tumor can stimulate the immune system to attack other tumors in the body that are not targeted by the radiation therapy.

    at UCSF

  • S0820, Adenoma and Second Primary Prevention Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The investigators hypothesize that the combination of eflornithine and sulindac will be effective in reducing a three-year event rate of adenomas and second primary colorectal cancers in patients previously treated for Stages 0 through III colon or rectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSD

  • Sotorasib and Panitumumab Versus Investigator's Choice for Participants With Kirsten Rat Sarcoma (KRAS) p.G12C Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18-100

    The aim of the study is to compare progression-free survival (PFS) in previously treated participants with Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS) p.G12C mutated colorectal cancer (CRC) receiving sotorasib 240 mg once daily (QD) and panitumumab vs investigator's choice (trifluridine and tipiracil, or regorafenib), and sotorasib 960 mg once daily (QD) and panitumumab vs investigator's choice (trifluridine and tipiracil, or regorafenib).

    at UC Irvine

  • Study of Cabozantinib Plus TAS102 in mCRC as Salvage Therapy

    open to eligible people ages 18-100

    This is a phase I clinical trial assessing the safety and recommended phase II dose of cabozantinib in combination with trifluridine/tipiracil (TAS102) in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC).

    at UC Irvine

  • Study of Magrolimab Given Together With FOLFIRI/BEV in Participants With Previously Treated Advanced Inoperable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objectives of this study are: (safety run-in cohort) to evaluate safety and tolerability, and the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) and (randomized cohort) to evaluate the efficacy of magrolimab in combination with bevacizumab and 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, and leucovorin (FOLFIRI) in previously treated participants with advanced inoperable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

    at UCLA

  • Study of NKTR 255 in Combination With Cetuximab in Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1b/2, open-label multicenter study evaluating NKTR-255 as a monotherapy and together with cetuximab in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), colorectal carcinoma (CRC), cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), anal cell carcinoma (ASCC) and cervical cancer. The recommended phase 2 dose of NKTR-255, determined in the dose escalation phase (Phase 1b), will be used to treat patients in Phase 2 of this study.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Study of Onvansertib in Combination With FOLFIRI and Bevacizumab Versus FOLFIRI and Bevacizumab for Second Line Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Participants With a Kirsten Rat Sarcoma Virus Gene (KRAS) or Neuroblastoma-RAS (NRAS) Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of 2 different doses of onvansertib in combination with a chemotherapy regimen of irinotecan, fluorouracil [5-FU], and leucovorin (FOLFIRI) and bevacizumab for treatment of confirmed metastatic and/or unresectable colorectal cancer (CRC) in participants with a kirsten rat sarcoma virus gene (KRAS) or neuroblastoma-RAS (NRAS) mutation who have progressed on an oxaliplatin/fluoropyrimidinebased regimen in the first-line setting.

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • Study of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors (MK-3475-158/KEYNOTE-158)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    In this study, participants with multiple types of advanced (unresectable and/or metastatic) solid tumors who have progressed on standard of care therapy will be treated with pembrolizumab (MK-3475).

    at UCSF

  • Study of Romiplostim for Chemotherapy-induced Thrombocytopenia in Adult Subjects With Gastrointestinal, Pancreatic, or Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18-100

    Study of Romiplostim for Chemotherapy-induced Thrombocytopenia in Adult Subjects with Gastrointestinal, Pancreatic, or Colorectal Cancer

    at UC Irvine

  • Study of the Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy of KPT-8602 in Participants With Relapsed/Refractory Cancer Indications

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a first-in-human, multi-center, open-label clinical study with separate dose escalation (Phase 1) and expansion (Phase 2) stages to assess preliminary safety, tolerability, and efficacy of the second generation oral XPO1 inhibitor KPT-8602 in participants with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM), metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome (HRMDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and newly diagnosed intermediate/high-risk MDS. Dose escalation and dose expansion may be included for all parts of the study as determined by ongoing study results.

    at UCLA

  • TATE and Pembrolizumab (MK3475) in mCRC and NSCLC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer or non-small cell lung cancer with liver metastasis treated with Trans-arterial Tirapazamine Embolization along with Pembrolizumab.

    at UC Irvine

  • Tegavivint for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Including Lymphomas and Desmoid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 30 years

    This phase I/II trial evaluates the highest safe dose, side effects, and possible benefits of tegavivint in treating patients with solid tumors that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Tegavivint interferes with the binding of beta-catenin to TBL1, which may help stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking the signals passed from one molecule to another inside a cell that tell a cell to grow.

    at UCSF

  • Testing the Addition of Nivolumab to Standard Treatment for Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Colorectal Cancer That Have a BRAF Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial tests whether adding nivolumab to the usual treatment (encorafenib and cetuximab) works better than the usual treatment alone to shrink tumors in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and whose tumor has a mutation in a gene called BRAF. Encorafenib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It is used in patients whose cancer has a certain mutation (change) in the BRAF gene. It works by blocking the action of mutated BRAF that signals cancer cells to multiply. This helps to stop or slow the spread of cancer cells. Cetuximab is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It binds to a protein called EGFR, which is found on some types of cancer cells. This may help keep cancer cells from growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nivolumab in combination with encorafenib and cetuximab may be more effective than encorafenib and cetuximab alone at stopping tumor growth and spreading in patients with metastatic or unresectable BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine

  • Testing the Combination of Two Anti-Cancer Drugs for Treating Advanced Solid Tumors with HER2 Expression

    “Volunteer for the DASH Trial and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The dose escalation phase of this trial identifies the best dose and safety of ceralasertib (AZD6738) when given in combination with trastuzumab deruxtecan (DS-8201a) in treating patients with solid tumors that have a change (mutation) in the HER2 gene or protein and have spread to other places in the body (advanced). The dose expansion phase (phase Ib) of this trial compares how colorectal and gastroesophageal cancers with HER2 mutation respond to treatment with a combination of ceralasertib and trastuzumab deruxtecan versus trastuzumab deruxtecan alone. Trastuzumab deruxtecan is a monoclonal antibody, called trastuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug, called deruxtecan. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers deruxtecan to kill them. Ceralasertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis

  • Genetic Testing in Screening Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Colon or Rectal Cancer for a COLOMATE Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial screens patients with colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) for genetic mutations for recommendation to a molecularly assigned therapy. Identifying gene mutations may help patients enroll onto target companion trials that target these mutations.

    at UCSD

  • Longitudinal Performance of Epi proColon

    open to eligible people ages 50-74

    This study will evaluate longitudinal performance of Epi proColon with respect to test positivity, longitudinal adherence to Epi proColon screening, adherence to follow-up colonoscopy and diagnostic yield, as well as assay failure rates.

    at UCSD

  • 9-ING-41 in Patients With Advanced Cancers

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    GSK-3β is a potentially important therapeutic target in human malignancies. The Actuate 1801 Phase 1/2 study is designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 9-ING-41, a potent GSK-3β inhibitor, as a single agent and in combination with cytotoxic agents, in patients with refractory cancers.

    at UCSF

  • A Phase 1 Study of Pegilodecakin (LY3500518) in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a first-in-human, open-label, dose escalation study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of pegilodecakin in participants with advanced solid tumors, dosed daily subcutaneously as a monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy or immunotherapy.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • A Study of Amivantamab Monotherapy and in Addition to Standard-of-Care Chemotherapy in Participants With Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to assess the anti-tumor activity of amivantamab as a monotherapy (Cohorts A, B, and C), to characterize the safety of amivantamab when added to standard-of care (SoC) chemotherapy in participants with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) (Ph2 cohorts), and to assess the recommended phase 2 combination dose (RP2CD) of amivantamab when added to SoC chemotherapy (Ph1b cohorts).

    at UCLA

  • A Study of DSP107 Alone and in Combination With Atezolizumab for Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Part 1: A first-in-human, open-label, Phase I dose escalation study of DSP107 monotherapy and combination therapy with atezolizumab in patients with advanced solid tumors. Part 2: Preliminary efficacy assessment of DSP107 single agent treatment and DSP107 in combination with atezolizumab in second line treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    at UCSD

  • A Study of LGK974 in Patients With Malignancies Dependent on Wnt Ligands

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary purpose of this study is to find the recommended dose of LGK974 as a single agent and in combination with PDR001 that can be safely given to adult patients with selected solid malignancies that have progressed despite standard therapy or for which no effective standard therapy exists

    at UCLA

  • A Study of XmAb®22841 Monotherapy & in Combination w/ Pembrolizumab in Subjects w/ Selected Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1, multiple dose, ascending-dose escalation study and expansion study designed to define a maximum tolerated dose and/or recommended dose of XmAb22841 monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab; to assess safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and anti-tumor activity of XmAb22841 monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab in subjects with select advanced solid tumors.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • An Open Label Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Etrumadenant (AB928) Based Treatment Combinations in Participants With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase 1b/2 open-label study will evaluate the antitumour activity and safety of etrumadenant (AB928) treatment combinations in participants with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    at UCLA

  • ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 and Irinotecan Hydrochloride combination for solid tumors that are metastatic or cannot be removed

    “Experimental targeted cancer therapy and chemotherapy combination for tumors that have returned, spread, or cannot be removed”

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of M6620 and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). M6620 and irinotecan hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, multicenter, global Phase 2 basket study of entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the treatment of patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK1/2/3, ROS1, or ALK gene fusion. Patients will be assigned to different baskets according to tumor type and gene fusion.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UCSF

  • Colonoscopy Versus Fecal Immunochemical Test in Reducing Mortality From Colorectal Cancer (CONFIRM)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently the second most common cause of cancer death in the United States, and one of the most preventable cancers. It has been shown in several randomized controlled trials that screening using fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) reduces CRC mortality by 13-33%. While there is strong consensus amongst experts regarding the value of CRC screening, the best approach to screening is not clear. Of the widely recommended modalities, FOBT and colonoscopy are the most commonly used within the United States. FOBT is inexpensive, non-invasive, and its use as a screening tool is supported by the highest quality evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials). Moreover, newer FOBT, such as fecal immunochemical tests or FITs, have advantages over conventional FOBT in terms of both test characteristics and ease of use that make them quite attractive as a population-based screening tool. While colonoscopy is invasive and has higher up-front risks and costs than FOBT, it does afford the opportunity to directly assess the colonic mucosa and is widely believed to be the best test to detect colorectal cancer. In addition, colonoscopy allows for the detection and removal of colorectal adenomas -a well recognized colorectal cancer precursor. There is indirect evidence that suggests colonoscopy is effective in reducing colorectal cancer mortality, but to date, no large clinical trials have been completed to support this assumption. While colonoscopy use is increasing, data is emerging that colonoscopy may not be as effective as previously believed. Prior support for colonoscopy as a screening test relied upon effectiveness estimates that now appear to be overly optimistic. Given the invasive nature of colonoscopy, the associated small, but real risk of complications, and dramatically higher costs than other screening tests, it is especially important to determine the true comparative effectiveness of colonoscopy relative to other proven non-invasive options. The investigators propose to perform a, large, simple, multicenter, randomized, parallel group trial directly comparing screening colonoscopy with annual FIT screening in average risk individuals. The hypothesis is that colonoscopy will be superior to FIT in the prevention of colorectal cancer mortality measured over 10 years. Individuals will be enrolled if they are currently eligible for CRC screening (e.g. no colonoscopy in the past 10 years and no FOBT in the past 1 year) and are between 50 and 75 years of age. The investigators will exclude individuals for whom colonoscopy is indicated (e.g. signs or symptoms of CRC, first degree family member with CRC, personal history of colorectal neoplasia or inflammatory bowel disease). All participants will complete baseline demographic, medication, and lifestyle questionnaires (e.g. diet, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory use, frequency of exercise) prior to randomization in a 1:1 ratio to either screening colonoscopy or annual FIT screening (Figure 1). Those testing positive by FIT will undergo evaluation to determine appropriateness for colonoscopy. Screening will be performed in a manner consistent with the currently accepted standard of care in order to determine the comparative effectiveness of the two screening strategies. Participants will be surveyed annually to determine if they have undergone colonoscopy or been diagnosed with CRC. The primary study endpoint will be CRC mortality within 10 years of enrollment. The secondary endpoints are (1) the incidence of CRC within 10 years of enrollment and (2) major complications of colonoscopy. Mortality will be determined through queries of the VA Vital Status File. Cause of death will be determined primarily using death certificates from the National Death Index-Plus database, augmented by adjudication of medical records for known CRC cases where CRC is not listed as a cause of death on the death certificate. The investigators postulate that screening colonoscopy will result in a 40% reduction in CRC mortality over 10 years relative to annual FIT screening. Using a log-rank test with a 2-sided test of significance, =0.05, a sample size of 50,000 participants will be required to test the primary hypothesis with 82% power, assuming a 1% annual rate of crossover from FIT to colonoscopy and a 0.5% annual rate of loss to follow-up. The planned study duration is 12.5 years with 2.5 years of recruitment and 10 years of follow-up for all enrolled participants.

    at UCSD

  • ColoRectal Cancer Screening for Southern California Community Health Centers

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening can reduce cancer deaths. However, screening and abnormal test follow-up rates are low among underserved populations. The screening rates of 19-58%, and rates of colonoscopy completion after abnormal stool tests of 18-57% in community health centers (CHC) systems are low. This highlights an opportunity to improve early detection and decrease burden of CRC in our region. Mailed outreach and navigation programs have been shown to increase colonoscopy completion rate. The next step is to understand how to best implement these programs in the community on a larger scale. To achieve this goal, the investigators propose a Hub-and-Spoke intervention combining centralized strategies to maximize CRC screening, follow-up, and referral-to-care. The investigators hypothesize that this intervention will be superior to usual care for increasing CRC screening, abnormal test follow-up, and referral-to-care. The investigators will conduct a randomized trial to determine effectiveness in: 1) improvement in proportion of individuals up-to-date with screening 3 years post implementation; 2) proportion with abnormal FIT who complete diagnostic colonoscopy within 6 months; and 3) proportion with CRC completing first treatment evaluation. The investigators will also evaluate the implementation, scalability, and sustainability of the multi-level implementation strategy. The intervention consists of: Mailed FIT and Reminders. Eligible individuals will receive an introductory letter describing the importance of CRC screening and noting that follow-up mail will include a FIT Kit. It will also be offered to patients who completed prior mailed FIT with normal test results. All materials will be in English and Spanish. Two weeks later, participants will receive a packet via mail containing the FIT kit, a one-page invitation inviting FIT completion and FIT instructions, a postage-paid envelope for return to the patient's CHC, and COVID-19 message. For non-compliant individuals not returning the kit, a reminder phone call and text message will be delivered 2 weeks later. The investigators will track returned letters, individuals who are later found to be up-to date with screening, and those who decline screening. The CHC will provide care coordination for patients with an abnormal FIT result.

    at UCSD

  • COLUMBIA-1: Novel Oncology Therapies in Combination With Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab as First- Line Therapy in MSS-CRC

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    COLUMBIA-1 is a Phase 1b/2 platform study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of standard of care (FOLFOX plus bevacizumab) alone and in combination with novel oncology therapies in first-line metastatic microsatellite-stable colorectal cancer (MSS-CRC).

    at UCLA

  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer and Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy and atezolizumab to see how well it works compared with combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with stage III colon cancer and deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy with atezolizumab may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with colon cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and/or Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair Metastatic Colorectal Cancer, the COMMIT Study

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and/or atezolizumab work in treating patients with deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Chemotherapy drugs, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bevacizumab may stop or slow colorectal cancer by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Durvalumab and Tremelimumab With or Without High or Low-Dose Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Colorectal or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab and tremelimumab and to see how well they work with or without high or low-dose radiation therapy in treating patients with colorectal or non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with durvalumab and tremelimumab, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving durvalumab and tremelimumab with radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with colorectal or non-small cell lung cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Gevokizumab With Standard of Care Anti-cancer Therapies for Metastatic Colorectal, Gastroesophageal, and Renal Cancers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will determine the pharmacodynamically-active dose of gevokizumab and the tolerable dose of gevokizumab in combination with the standard of care anti-cancer therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, metastatic gastroesophageal cancer and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and the preliminary efficacy of gevokizumab in combination with the SOC anti-cancer therapy in subjects with mCRC and mGEC.

    at UCLA

  • Increasing Engagement With Messages Regarding CRC Screening Among Adults Aged 45-49

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In May of 2021, the United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) updated their colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines by recommending screening at an earlier age for average-risk adults starting at the age of 45 years old (Grade B recommendation). This is in addition to their Grade A recommendations of continuing to screen average-risk adults ages 50-75 years old. As the investigators health system aims to screen the newly eligible population of average-risk patients between the ages of 45-49, the investigators proposed randomized controlled trial is aimed to determine the most effective patient outreach approach to increase patients' engagement with messages regarding CRC screening and screening uptake within this specific age-group.

    at UCLA

  • Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Surgery for Stage II Colon Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and bevacizumab to see how well they work compared to oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil in treating patients who have undergone surgery for stage II colon cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving combination chemotherapy together with bevacizumab is more effective than combination chemotherapy alone in treating colon cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil With or Without Celecoxib in Treating Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying giving oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil together to compare how well they work when given together with or without celecoxib in treating patients with stage III colon cancer previously treated with surgery. RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Celecoxib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil is more effective with or without celecoxib in treating colon cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSF

  • Panitumumab, Regorafenib, or TAS-102, in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Unresectable RAS Wild-Type Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well retreatment with panitumumab works compared to standard of care regorafenib or trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (TAS-102) in treating patients with colorectal cancer that is negative for RAS wild-type colorectal cancer has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), and/or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), and is negative for resistance mutations in blood. Treatment with panitumumab may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Some tumors need growth factors to keep growing. Growth factor antagonists, such as regorafenib, may interfere with the growth factor and stop the tumor from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as TAS-102, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer than with the usual treatment of regorafenib or TAS-102.

    at UCSD

  • Pembrolizumab, Capecitabine, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Microsatellite Stable Colorectal Cancer That Is Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and best dose of capecitabine when given together with pembrolizumab and bevacizumab, and investigates how well they work in treating patients with microsatellite stable colorectal cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes, has spread to other places in the body, or that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab and bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving capecitabine together with pembrolizumab and bevacizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Phase 1/2 Study of the Highly-selective RET Inhibitor, Pralsetinib (BLU-667), in Participants With Thyroid Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Other Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1/2, open-label, first-in-human (FIH) study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary antineoplastic activity of pralsetinib (BLU-667) administered orally in participants with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), RET-altered NSCLC and other RET-altered solid tumors.

    at UC Irvine

  • Phase III Study of Trifluridine/Tipiracil in Combination With Bevacizumab vs Trifluridine/Tipiracil Single Agent in Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is designed as an international, open-label, controlled two-arm, randomized phase III comparison study evaluating the efficacy and safety of trifluridine/tipiracil in combination with bevacizumab versus trifluridine/tipiracil monotherapy in patients with refractory mCRC.

    at UCLA

  • PrehabPal: A Digital Tool to Help Older Adults Prepare for Cancer Surgery

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is a multi-center, randomized trial investigating the use of PrehabPal web app versus a written surgery prehabilitation instructions among individuals aged 65 years and older preparing for colon cancer surgery. PrehabPal is a web app designed with, and for, older adults preparing for surgery at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). This app has the potential to fill a crucial clinical gap for older cancer patients by designing an individualized prehabilitation program and providing prehabilitation coaching.

    at UCSF

  • Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin in treating patients with lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or solid tumors with liver dysfunction. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by entering the cancer cells and by blocking the activity of proteins that are important for the cancer's growth and survival.

    at UC Davis

  • S1613, Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab or Cetuximab and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2/Neu Amplified Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2/neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Savolitinib in Treating Patients With MET Amplified Metastatic or Unresectable Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well savolitinib works in treating patients with MET amplified colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Savolitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis

  • Screening TO Prevent ColoRectal Cancer (STOP CRC) Among At-Risk Chinese and Korean American Primary Care Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The objective of the study is to conduct a randomized controlled trial to determine the impact of a multi-level culturally-sensitive decision support intervention on colorectal cancer screening adherence among 400 Chinese and Korean American primary care patients.

    at UC Irvine

  • Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of selumetinib when given together with cyclosporine in treating patients with solid tumors or colorectal cancer that have spread to other places in the body and cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Selumetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Biological therapies, such as cyclosporine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Giving selumetinib and cyclosporine may be a better treatment for solid tumors or colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Study of Covalent Menin Inhibitor BMF-219 in Adult Patients With KRAS Driven Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, and Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    A Phase 1/1b dose finding study to determine the OBD(s) and RP2D(s) of BMF-219, a covalent menin inhibitor small molecule, in subjects with KRAS mutated unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic NSCLC (Cohort 1), PDAC (Cohort 2), and CRC (Cohort 3).

    at UCSD

  • Study of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) vs Standard Therapy in Participants With Microsatellite Instability-High (MSI-H) or Mismatch Repair Deficient (dMMR) Stage IV Colorectal Carcinoma (MK-3475-177/KEYNOTE-177)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In this study, participants with stage IV Microsatellite Instability-High (MSI-H) or Mismatch Repair Deficient (dMMR) colorectal carcinoma (CRC) will be randomly assigned to receive either pembrolizumab or the Investigator's choice of 1 of 6 standard of care (SOC) chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of advanced colorectal carcinoma. The primary study hypothesis is that pembrolizumab will prolong progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) compared to current SOC chemotherapy.

    at UCLA

  • Study of VE800 and Nivolumab in Patients With Selected Types of Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of VE800 in combination with Nivolumab in patients with selected types of advanced or metastatic cancer

    at UCLA

  • Study to Test the Safety and Tolerability of PF-07209960 in Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a first-in-human, Phase 1, open label, multicenter, multiple dose, dose escalation and dose expansion study intended to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and potential clinical benefit of PF-07209960, an anti-PD-1 targeting IL-15 fusion protein, in participants with selected locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors for whom no standard therapy is available, or would not be an appropriate option in the opinion of the participant and their treating physician, or participants who have refused standard therapy. The study contains 2 parts, single agent Dose Escalation (Part 1) to determine the recommended dose of PF-07209960, followed by Dose Expansion (Part 2) in selected tumor types at the recommended dose.

    at UCLA

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

  • The Active After Cancer Trial (AACT)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is being done to determine whether a telephone-based counseling intervention can help survivors of breast and colorectal cancer increase their weekly physical activity. Observational evidence suggests that physical activity after breast and colorectal cancer diagnosis decreases recurrence rates. Unfortunately, many people become less active during cancer therapy, and a substantial proportion never return to pre-diagnosis levels of physical activity. This study looks to see if people who have recently finished chemotherapy for breast, colon or rectal cancer can be motivated to increase their exercise by talking to an exercise specialist over the phone. The study also looks at changes in mood, fatigue, fitness, fat distribution and weight.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • The Impact of Choice on Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In May of 2021, the United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) updated their colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines by recommending screening at an earlier age for average-risk adults starting at the age of 45 years old (Grade B recommendation). This is in addition to their Grade A recommendations of continuing to screen average-risk adults ages 50-75 years old. UCLA Health previously implemented a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) outreach program wherein FIT kits are mailed to average-risk patients overdue for CRC screening twice annually to promote screening uptake. As the investigators health system aims to screen the newly eligible population of average-risk patients between the ages of 45-49, the investigators proposed randomized controlled trial is aimed to determine the most effective patient outreach approach to maximize screening uptake within this age-group.

    at UCLA

  • Tucatinib Combined With Trastuzumab and TAS-102 for the Treatment of HER2 Positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Molecularly Selected Patients, 3T Study

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This phase II trial studies whether tucatinib combined with trastuzumab and TAS-102 works to shrink tumors in patients with HER2 positive colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) and has one of the following gene mutations detected in blood: PIK3CA, KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF V600. Tucatinib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of the abnormal protein that signals tumor cells to multiply. This helps stop or slow the spread of tumor cells. Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. TAS-102 is a combination of 2 drugs; trifluridine and tipiracil. Trifluridine is in a class of medications called thymidine-based nucleoside analogues. It works by stopping the growth of tumor cells. Tipiracil is in a class of medications called thymidine phosphorylase inhibitors. It works by slowing the breakdown of trifluridine by the body. Giving tucatinib, trastuzumab, and TAS-102 together may work better than usual treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    at UCSD

  • Accuracy for Predicting Deep Submucosal Invasion

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The main aim of this study is to determine whether the assessment of the invasive pattern based on NBI with dual focus/magnification or BLI with magnification ± chromoendoscopy (NBI+CE) for predicting deep invasion is significantly more accurate than the assessment based on white light endoscopy (WLE), carried out by trained endoscopists.

    at UCSF

  • Colorectal Cancer Screening in Cystic Fibrosis

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This multi-center study will compare multi-target DNA and quantitative FIT stool-based testing to colonoscopy in individuals with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) undergoing colon cancer screening with colonoscopy. The primary endpoint is detection of any adenomas, including advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer (CRC).

    at UCLA

  • Improving Colonoscopy Quality for Colorectal Cancer Screening in the National VA Healthcare System

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    High quality screening colonoscopy is critical for colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention in Veterans. There is significant variability in colonoscopy quality in VA that is directly linked to differences in CRC incidence and death. The investigators developed the VA Endoscopy Quality Improvement Program (VA-EQuIP) that the National GI program office will implement using centralized quality measurement and reporting for adenoma detection rates (ADR), bi-annual audit and feedback with provider benchmarking to local and national performance, and collaborative learning to support colonoscopy quality improvement. Using a cluster randomized controlled trial, the investigators will study the implementation of VA-EQuIP and determine the efficacy of its intervention on adenoma detection rates, which are directly linked to CRC incidence and death.

    at UCSF

  • Prevention of Colorectal Cancer Through Multiomics Blood Testing

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The PREEMPT CRC study is a prospective multi-center observational study to validate a blood-based test for the early detection of colorectal cancer by collecting blood samples from average-risk participants who will undergo a routine screening colonoscopy.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

Our lead scientists for Colorectal Tumor research studies include .

Last updated: