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Immunodeficiency clinical trials at University of California Health

28 in progress, 14 open to eligible people

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  • A Study of Experimental Tabelecleucel in Subjects with Epstein-Barr Virus-associated Diseases (Mono)

    open to all eligible people

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of tabelecleucel in participants with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated diseases.

    at UC Davis

  • Adenovirus-specific Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes for Refractory Adenovirus Infection

    open to eligible people ages 1 month to 30 years

    Related donor Adenovirus (ADV) specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) manufactured with the Miltenyi CliniMACS Prodigy Cytokine Capture System will be administered intravenously in in children, adolescents and young adults with refractory ADV infection post Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (AlloHSCT), with primary immunodeficiencies (PID) or post solid organ transplant. Funding Source: FDA OOPD

    at UCSF

  • Autologous Gene Therapy for Artemis-Deficient SCID

    open to eligible people ages 2 months and up

    This study aims to determine if a new method can be used to treat Artemis-deficient Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (ART-SCID), a severe form of primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the DCLRE1C gene. This method involves transferring a normal copy of the DCLRE1C gene into stem cells of an affected patient. Participants will receive an infusion of stem cells transduced with a self-inactivating lentiviral vector that contains a normal copy of the DCLRE1C gene. Prior to the infusion they will receive sub-ablative, dose-targeted busulfan conditioning. The study will investigate if the procedure is safe, whether it can be done according to the methods described in the protocol, and whether the procedure will provide a normal immune system for the patient. A total of 25 patients will be enrolled at the University of California San Francisco in this single-site trial, and will be followed for 15 years post-infusion. It is hoped that this type of gene transfer may offer improved outcomes for ART-SCID patients who lack a brother or sister who can be used as a donor for stem cell transplantation or who have failed to develop a functioning immune system after a previous stem cell transplant.

    at UCSF

  • Conditioning SCID Infants Diagnosed Early

    open to eligible people ages up to 2 years

    The investigators want to study if lower doses of chemotherapy will help babies with SCID to achieve good immunity with less short and long-term risks of complications after transplantation. This trial identifies babies with types of immune deficiencies that are most likely to succeed with this approach and offers them transplant early in life before they get severe infections or later if their infections are under control. It includes only patients receiving unrelated or mismatched related donor transplants. The study will test if patients receiving transplant using either a low dose busulfan or a medium dose busulfan will have immune recovery of both T and B cells, measured by the ability to respond to immunizations after transplant. The exact regimen depends on the subtype of SCID the patient has. Donors used for transplant must be unrelated or half-matched related (haploidentical) donors, and peripheral blood stem cells must be used. To minimize the chance of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the stem cells will have most, but not all, of the T cells removed, using a newer, experimental approach of a well-established technology. Once the stem cell transplant is completed, patients will be followed for 3 years. Approximately 9-18 months after the transplant, vaccinations will be administered, and a blood test measuring whether your child's body has responded to the vaccine will be collected.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • EBV-specific Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) for Refractory EBV Infection

    open to eligible people ages 1 month to 30 years

    Related donor Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) manufactured with the Miltenyi CliniMACS Prodigy Cytokine Capture System will be administered in children, adolescents and young adults with refractory EBV infection post Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (AlloHSCT), with primary immunodeficiencies (PID) or post solid organ transplant. Funding Source: FDA OOPD

    at UCSF

  • Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    “Study looking at stem cell gene therapy to treat patients with HIV and lymphoma”

    open to eligible people ages 19 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene therapy in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoma that did not respond to therapy or came back after an original response receiving stem cell transplant. In gene therapy, small stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) called "anti-HIV genes" are introduced into the stem cells in the laboratory to make the gene therapy product used in this study. The type of anti-HIV genes and therapy in this study may make the patient's immune cells more resistant to HIV-1 and prevent new immune cells from getting infected with HIV-1.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Gene Transfer for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency in Newly Diagnosed Infants

    open to eligible males ages up to 24 months

    SCID-X1 is a genetic disorder of blood cells caused by DNA changes in a gene that is required for the normal development of the human immune system. The purpose of this study is to determine if a new method, called lentiviral gene transfer, can be used to treat SCID-X1. This method involves transferring a normal copy of the common gamma chain gene into the participant's bone marrow stem cells. The investigators want to determine if the procedure is safe, whether it can be done according to the methods they have developed, and whether the procedure will provide a normal immune system for the patient. It is hoped that this type of gene transfer may offer a new way to treat children with SCID-X1 that do not have a brother or sister who can be used as a donor for stem cell transplantation.

    at UCSF

  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea Endotypes and Impact on Phenotypes of People Living With HIV

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The investigators seek to understand how the different underlying causes of OSA affect the way people living with HIV (PLWH) experience OSA. The investigators also want to understand how symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea improve with treatment, and if this too, is affected by the underlying cause of OSA in that individual

    at UCSD

  • Phase I/II Trial of Lentiviral Gene Transfer for SCID-X1 With Low Dose Targeted Busulfan Conditioning

    open to eligible males ages up to 5 years

    This is a phase I/II open label multi-center study in which patients will receive low dose targeted busulfan followed by infusion of autologous CD34+ selected bone marrow or mobilized peripheral blood cells transduced with the G2SCID vector. Subjects will be enrolled over 3 years and be followed for 2 years post-infusion on this protocol, then followed long-term on a separate long-term follow-up protocol. Enrollment of subjects will be agreed upon by representatives of both sites. Data will be collected uniformly from both sites through an electronic capture system and key laboratory studies will be centralized. Harvest, cellular manufacturing and infusion will occur at each site using the same SOPs. Key aspects of cellular product characterization will be centralized

    at UCLA

  • Registry Study of Revcovi Treatment in Patients With ADA-SCID

    open to eligible people ages up to 65 years

    The objective of this study is to develop a registry of patients with adenosine deaminase severe combined immune deficiency (ADA-SCID) treated with Revcovi™ that contains clinical and biochemical assessments for safety and dose adjustment based on adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity and erythrocyte deoxyadenosine nucleotide (dAXP) levels as well as immunologic monitoring.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Testing the Addition of an Experimental Medication MK-3475 (Pembrolizumab) to Usual Anti-Retroviral Medications in Patients With HIV and Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of pembrolizumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and malignant neoplasms that have come back (relapsed), do not respond to treatment (refractory), or have distributed over a large area in the body (disseminated). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    at UCSF

  • Treatment of Refractory BK Infections With Related Donor BK Specific Cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs)

    open to eligible people ages 1 month to 30 years

    BK cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) manufactured with the Miltenyi CliniMACS Prodigy Cytokine Capture System will be safe and effective in decreasing specific viral load in children, adolescents and young adults (CAYA) with refractory BK infection post Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (AlloHSCT) or with primary immunodeficiencies (PID).

    at UCSF

  • Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Immunogenicity of a Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)-Based Anti-Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Vaccine (Triplex®)

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Participants will be randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive either two injections of CMV-MVA Triplex® or placebo administered at study Entry/Day 0 and week 4. Vaccine Group: 60 participants will receive CMV-MVA Triplex® containing 5 x 108 plaque-forming unit (pfu) ±0.5 x 108 pfu of MVA Vaccine Encoding CMV Antigens by intramuscular (IM) deltoid injections. Placebo Group: 30 participants will receive a volume of placebo (7.5% Lactose in phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]) that matches the volume of the active vaccine injection by IM deltoid injections.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Virus Specific Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes (CTLs) for Refractory Cytomegalovirus (CMV)

    open to eligible people ages 1 month to 30 years

    CMV cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) manufactured with the Miltenyi CliniMACS Prodigy Cytokine Capture System will be administered in children, adolescents and young adults (CAYA) with refractory cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection post Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (AlloHSCT), with primary immunodeficiencies (PID) or post solid organ transplant. Funding Source: FDA OOPD

    at UCSF

  • A Study to Evaluate the Anti-inflammatory Effects of Letermovir (Prevymis) in Adults With Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 and Asymptomatic Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Who Are on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy, Plus Its Effect on Chronic Inflammation, HIV Persistence and Other Clinical Outcomes.

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is an open-label, controlled study, conducted at US sites to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effectiveness of the study drug letermovir in adults with HIV and asymptomatic cytomegalovirus (CMV) who are on antiretroviral therapy (ART)-mediated suppression. Participants will be randomly assigned to receive either letermovir once daily or no anti-CMV treatment, for 48 weeks.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • An Observational LTFU Study for Patients Previously Treated With Autologous ex Vivo Gene Therapy for ADA-SCID

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This observational long-term follow-up study is designed to collect safety and efficacy data from ADA-SCID patients previously treated with autologous ex vivo gene therapy products based on the EFS-ADA LV encoding for human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene (EFS-ADA LV), as part of the OTL-101 clinical development program. No investigational medicinal product will be administered to these patients as part of the OTL-101-6 study.

    at UCLA

  • Cabozantinib S-Malate in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors and Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cabozantinib s-malate in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment and human immunodeficiency virus. Cabozantinib s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Gene Transfer for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, X-linked (SCID-X1) Using a Self-inactivating (SIN) Gammaretroviral Vector

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Researchers are working on ways to treat SCID patients who don't have a matched brother or sister. One of the goals is to avoid the problems that happen with stem cell transplant from parents and unrelated people, such as repeat transplants, incomplete cure of the immune system, exposure to chemotherapy, and graft versus host disease. The idea behind gene transfer is to replace the broken gene by putting a piece of genetic material (DNA) that has the normal gene into the child's cells. Gene transfer can only be done if we know which gene is missing or broken in the patient. For SCID-X1, gene transfer has been done in the laboratory and in two previous clinical trials by inserting the normal gene into stem cells from bone marrow. The bone marrow is the "factory" inside the bones that creates blood and immune cells. So fixing the gene in the bone marrow stem cells should fix the immune problem, without giving chemotherapy and without risk of graft versus host disease, because the child's own cells are used, rather than another person's. Out of the 20 subjects enrolled in the two previous trials, 18 are alive with better immune systems after gene transfer. Two of the surviving subjects received gene corrected cells over 10 years ago. Gene transfer is still research for two reasons. One is that not enough children have been studied to tell if the procedure is consistently successful. Of the 20 children enrolled in the previous two trials, one child did not have correction of the immune system, and died of complications after undergoing stem cell transplant. The second important reason why gene transfer is research is that we are still learning about the side effects of gene transfer and how to do gene transfer safely. In the last two trials, 5 children have experienced a serious side effect. These children developed leukemia related to the gene transfer itself. Leukemia is a cancer of the white blood cells, a condition where a few white blood cells grow out of control. Of these children, 4 of the 5 have received chemotherapy (medication to treat cancer) and are currently in remission (no leukemia can be found by sensitive testing), whereas one died of gene transfer-related leukemia.

    at UCLA

  • Health Information for Infected Veterans

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a study of study of My HealtheVet (MHV) use by Veterans diagnosed with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and VA providers/staff who care for them. The investigators hope to learn and understand how MHV can improve the self-management of chronic conditions like HIV. First, the investigators will review Veteran medical records to look at the relationship between use of MHV and whether it has a positive or negative impact on the Veteran's management of HIV. Next, the investigators will interview participants to find out how MHV for self-management is used by Veterans and to find out why Veterans and providers choose to use (or not use) specific MHV tools. Lastly, the investigators will use the information found from the first two steps and create an intervention that will encourage non-MHV users to use the MHV tools that can help achieve health-related goals. Once the intervention has been developed,Veterans and providers will participate in a "cognitive walkthrough" to help the researchers test the intervention to see if it is usable, possible, and acceptable.

    at UCSD

  • Improving the Diagnosis of Common Variable Immune Deficiency

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an observational, case-control study with a single blood draw among two cohorts, patients with antibody deficiency (e.g., CVID) and healthy controls. Samples will be analyzed by mass cytometry (CyTOF) to examine the major signaling pathways of all circulating innate and adaptive immune cell types, as well as whole exome sequencing. The goal is to improve our general understanding of the human immune response to infections and the diagnosis of CVID.

    at UCLA

  • Incidence of HIV Infection in Screening Indian Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This research trial studies the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in screening Indian men who have sex with men (MSM). Gathering health information over time from Indian MSM may help doctors determine how many Indian MSM develop new cases of HIV infection.

    at UCSF

  • Natural History Study of SCID Disorders

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This study is a prospective evaluation of children with Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID) who are treated under a variety of protocols used by participating institutions. In order to determine the patient, recipient and transplant-related variables that are most important in determining outcome, study investigators will uniformly collect pre-, post- and peri-transplant (or other treatment) information on all children enrolled into this study. Children will be divided into three strata: - Stratum A: Typical SCID with virtual absence of autologous T cells and poor T cell function - Stratum B: Atypical SCID (leaky SCID, Omenn syndrome and reticular dysgenesis with limited T cell diversity or number and reduced function), and - Stratum C: ADA deficient SCID and XSCID patients receiving alternative therapy including PEG-ADA ERT or gene therapy. Each Group/Cohort Stratum will be analyzed separately.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Prevention and Treatment Continuum for Youth at HIV Risk, Acutely Infected and With Established HIV Infection

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a strategic prospective cohort study which will measure the effects of early intensive antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the establishment and persistence of HIV-1 reservoirs and HIV-1-specific immunity in acutely /recently HIV infected youth aged 12 to 24 years as compared to newly diagnosed youth with established infection > 6 months. Participants with newly diagnosed acute /recent HIV-1 infection will be offered enrollment into the study with immediate initiation of ART which is the current standard of care.

    at UCLA

  • Study Evaluating Pharmacokinetics (PK), Safety, and Efficacy of Cobicistat-boosted Atazanavir (ATV/co) or Cobicistat-boosted Darunavir (DRV/co) and Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Alafenamide (F/TAF) in HIV-1 Infected, Virologically Suppressed Pediatric Participants

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Cohort 1: The primary objectives are: - To evaluate the steady-state pharmacokinetics (PK) of Atazanavir (ATV) and Darunavir (DRV) and confirm the dose of Cobicistat-boosted Atazanavir (ATV/co) or Cobicistat-boosted Darunavir (DRV/co) in HIV-1 infected, virologically suppressed adolescent participants weighing ≥ 25 kg (12 to < 18 years of age) - To evaluate the safety and tolerability of ATV/co or DRV/co through 24 weeks in HIV-1 infected, virologically suppressed adolescent participants weighing ≥ 25 kg (12 to < 18 years of age) Cohort 2: The primary objectives are: - To evaluate the steady-state PK of ATV and DRV and confirm the dose of ATV/co or DRV/co in HIV-1 infected pediatric participants weighing ≥ 25 to < 35 kg (6 to < 12 years of age) - To evaluate the steady-state PK of tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) and confirm the dose of emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (F/TAF) in HIV-1 infected pediatric participants weighing ≥ 25 to < 35 kg (6 to < 12 years of age) - To evaluate the safety and tolerability of ATV/co, DRV/co, and F/TAF through 24 weeks in HIV-1 infected pediatric participants weighing ≥ 25 to < 35 kg (6 to < 12 years of age) Cohort 3: The primary objectives are: - To evaluate the steady-state PK of ATV and DRV and confirm the dose of ATV/co or DRV/co in HIV-1 infected pediatric participants weighing ≥ 14 to < 25 kg (≥ 3 years of age) - To evaluate the steady-state PK of TAF and confirm the dose of F/TAF in HIV-1 infected pediatric participants weighing ≥ 14 to < 25 kg (≥ 3 years of age) - To evaluate the safety and tolerability of ATV/co, DRV/co, and F/TAF through 24 weeks in HIV-1 infected pediatric participants weighing ≥ 14 to < 25 kg (≥ 3 years of age)

    at UCLA

  • Study of Thiotepa and TEPA Drug Exposure in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Thiotepa is a chemotherapy drug used extensively in bone marrow transplantation. Thiotepa is a prodrug that undergoes metabolic conversion in the liver by CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 to its primary active metabolite, TEPA. The goal of this study is to determine what causes some children to have different drug concentrations of thiotepa and TEPA in their bodies and if drug levels are related to whether or not a child experiences severe side-effects during their bone marrow transplant. The hypothesis is that certain clinical and genetic factors cause changes in thiotepa and TEPA drug levels in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients and that high levels may cause severe side-effects.

    at UCSF

  • Study to Assess the Effectiveness and Safety of Lenacapavir for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of lenacapavir (LEN) in preventing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) - 1 infection relative to the background HIV-1 incidence rate. The study will be conducted in 2 parts: a cross-sectional study (Incidence Phase) and a double-blind, randomized study (Randomized Phase). The Incidence Phase will include initial assessments that will provide an estimate of the concurrent background HIV-1 incidence rate. The Randomized Phase of the study will have a Blinded Phase, a LEN Open-label Extension (OLE) Phase, and a pharmacokinetic (PK) Tail Phase. The primary objective for the Incidence Phase of this study is to estimate the HIV-1 background incidence rate. The primary objective of the Randomized Blinded Phase of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of lenacapavir for HIV-1 pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in cisgender men (CGM), transgender women (TGW), transgender men (TGM), and gender nonbinary people (GNB) ≥ 16 years of age who have condomless receptive anal sex with partners assigned male at birth and are at risk for HIV-1 infection.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Study To Evaluate Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Alafenamide (F/TAF) in Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) Infected Children and Adolescents Virologically Suppressed on a 2- Nucleoside/Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (2-NRTI)-Containing Regimen

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective of this study is to confirm the TAF dose and to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of TAF, safety, and tolerability of F/TAF in HIV-1 infected children and adolescents virologically suppressed (defined as having < 50 copies/mL of HIV-1 ribonucleic acid [RNA] for a period of at least 6 months) while on a stable NRTI containing regimen.

    at UCLA

  • Switch to Doravirine/Islatravir (DOR/ISL) in Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) Participants Treated With Bictegravir/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Alafenamide (BIC/FTC/TAF) (MK-8591A-018)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of a switch to MK-8591A (a fixed dose combination of doravirine and islatravir) in human immunodeficiency virus -1 (HIV-1)-infected participants virologically suppressed on a regimen of bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (BIC/FTC/TAF). The primary hypothesis is that a switch to MK-8591A will be non-inferior to continued treatment with BIC/FTC/TAF as assessed by the proportion of participants with HIV-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) ≥50 copies/mL at Week 48.

    at UC Davis UCSF

Our lead scientists for Immunodeficiency research studies include .

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