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Mild Cognitive Impairment clinical trials at UC Health
18 in progress, 13 open to new patients

  • A Study of Brain Aging in Vietnam War Veterans

    open to eligible people ages 50-90

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common combat related problems and may be associated with a greater risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study is to examine the possible connections between TBI and PTSD, and the signs and symptoms of AD on Veterans as they age. The information collected will help to learn more about how these injuries may affect Veterans of the Vietnam War as they grow older, as well as Veterans of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, who also have these types of combat related injuries.

    at UCSF UC Irvine UCSD

  • Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 3 (ADNI3) Protocol

    “This research study will look at clinical, cognitive, imaging, genetic, and biomarker aspects of Alzheimer’s disease.”

    open to eligible people ages 55-90

    Since its launch in 2004, the overarching aim of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has been realized in informing the design of therapeutic trials in AD. ADNI3 continues the previously funded ADNI-1, ADNI-GO, and ADNI-2 studies that have been combined public/private collaborations between academia and industry to determine the relationships between the clinical, cognitive, imaging, genetic and biochemical biomarker characteristics of the entire spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The overall goal of the study is to continue to discover, optimize, standardize, and validate clinical trial measures and biomarkers used in AD research.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UCLA UCSF UC Davis

  • Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy for Mild Cognitive Impairment

    open to eligible people ages 55 years and up

    The number of older Veterans with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) seeking care within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is increasing and is expected to increase more rapidly as Vietnam era Veterans age. The cognitive effects of MCI and subsequent neurodegenerative disorders can adversely affect a Veteran's ability to function independently and failure to provide appropriate intervention can result in an increased need for healthcare services and VA benefits in the future. The VA currently spends over $19,000 annually per patient to care for Veterans with dementia (Zhu et al., 2009), and delaying the onset of dementia even by one to two years will result in substantial financial savings to the VA and quality of life gains for the Veteran. Since present pharmacological interventions have demonstrated limited efficacy, alternative treatments are needed. Therefore, an evidence-based cognitive training intervention that optimally addresses the needs of older Veterans with MCI is of critical importance to the VA patient care mission.

    at UCSD

  • Deep Brain Stimulation With LIFUP for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    open to eligible people ages 55 years and up

    The purpose of the proposed study is to determine the feasibility of brief brain stimulation, using a device called Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Pulsation (LIFUP), for persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild (early-stage) Alzheimer's disease (AD). As a secondary aim, the investigators will explore whether this brief intervention is associated with improvements in cognitive functioning immediately and one week following the intervention. Subjects will be randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: either the LIFUP administration will be designed to increase the activity of neurons in a certain part of the brain or decrease the activity of neurons. The investigators will study up to 8 subjects with MCI or mild AD. Initially, subjects will undergo a screening assessment with a study physician to determine medical and psychiatric history, establish AD diagnosis, and undergo a blood draw, if standard recent labs for dementia and EKG are unavailable. Subjects that meet criteria and agree to participate in the study will undergo a follow-up visit. In the baseline measurement visit, participants will first undergo neuropsychological testing. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of two LIFUP pulsing paradigms. Participants will then be administered four successive LIFUP treatments while the participants are in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixty minutes following the administration, participants will undergo a second neuropsychological test. A final follow-up assessment will be administered at one week.

    at UCLA

  • Exercise in Adults With Mild Memory Problems

    open to eligible people ages 65-89

    This study evaluates the effects of physical exercise on cognition, functional status, brain atrophy and blood flow, and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in adults with a mild memory impairment. Half of participants will participate in a stretching-balance-range of motion exercise program, while the other half will participate in a moderate/high aerobic training program.

    at UC Irvine

  • Impact of Grape Consumption on Brain Metabolism and Neuropsychological Performance Over 1 Year

    open to eligible people ages 65-85

    Constituents of grapes have been studied for their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties. In the past decade, there has been emerging evidence regarding a potential role for grapes in slowing cognitive decline and other effects of aging. Furthermore, evidence has been obtained in vivo that supplementation with grape seed extract in aged rats improves cognitive performance, and that supplementation with grapes in people having decline in cognition leads to preservation of metabolism in brain regions important to cognitive function over a period of six months. The investigator aims to measure effects of grape intake on cerebral metabolism and neuropsychological performance, and to determine whether initial patterns, and magnitude of change, of cerebral metabolism assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) can serve respectively as a predictor of, and biomarker for, the magnitude of cognitive changes resulting from intake of grapes over a period of at least one year.

    at UCLA

  • Living Alone in Old Age With Cognitive Impairment

    open to eligible people ages 55 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to better understand the experience of living alone in older age with cognitive impairment. We recruit adults 55+ living alone with cognitive impairment such as Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment. This study investigates the priorities and concerns of older adults living alone with cognitive impairment. Participants are interviewed 5 times for one hour in their homes within 3 months at a time that works for them.

    at UCSF

  • Longitudinal Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease Study Protocol

    open to eligible people ages 40-64

    The Longitudinal Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease Study (LEADS) is a non-randomized, natural history, non-treatment study designed to look at disease progression in individuals with early onset cognitive impairment . Clinical/cognitive, imaging, biomarker, and genetic characteristics will be assessed across three cohorts: (1) early onset Alzheimer's Disease (EOAD) participants, (2) early onset non-Alzheimer's Disease (EO-nonAD) participants,and (3) cognitively normal (CN) control participants.

    at UCSF

  • Nicotinamide as an Early Alzheimer's Disease Treatment

    open to eligible people ages 50 years and up

    The purpose of this research study is to test whether nicotinamide, also known as vitamin B3 or niacinamide, taken in high doses, can reduce phosphorylation of tau (the protein that accumulates in neurofibrillary tangles) in people with Mild Cognitive Impairment or mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia.

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • Occupational Therapy-Based Cognitive Rehabilitation of Cocaine Abusers: A Pilot Study

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study integrates a model of occupational-therapy based cognitive rehabilitation as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for cocaine abusers. We hypothesize that cognitive impairment and quality of life would improve and that cocaine use would decrease in those participants receiving occupational-therapy based cognitive rehabilitation.

    at UCSF

  • Phase II Trial of Tesamorelin for Cognition in Aging HIV-Infected Persons

    open to eligible people ages 40 years and up

    The aim of this study is to test whether tesamorelin, in combination with a text-messaging application to help with motivation and adherence, will significantly improve memory and thinking in HIV.

    at UCSD

  • Preventing Loss of Independence Through Exercise (PLIÉ) in Persons With Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    Nearly 1 in 10 older Americans have dementia, which is a devastating condition that leads to a progressive loss of independence and functional status. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an intermediate stage between the expected cognitive decline of normal aging and the more-serious decline of dementia. The investigators have developed a novel, integrative exercise program called Preventing Loss of Independence through Exercise (PLIE) that incorporates elements from Eastern and Western exercise modalities and is designed to build and maintain the capacity to perform basic functional movements while increasing mindful body awareness and enhancing social connection. Pilot study results suggest that PLIE is associated with meaningful improvements in physical function, cognitive function and quality of life in individuals with dementia, as well as reduced caregiver burden. The goal of the current study is to perform a randomized, controlled trial to test the efficacy of PLIE in older adults who have MCI but who do not yet have dementia. The investigators will also investigate the neural mechanisms underlying PLIE by acquiring brain imaging measures.

    at UCSF

  • Reducing Risk for Alzheimer's Disease in High-Risk Women Through Yogic Meditation Training

    open to eligible females ages 50-90

    The purpose of this pilot study will be to test whether Kundalini yoga (KY) and Kirtan Kriya (KK) yogic meditation is superior to Memory Enhancement Training (MET) for improving cognitive functioning, health (including cardiovascular factors), and mood in women with high AD risk.

    at UCLA

  • Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to build upon the information obtained in the original Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI1) and ADNI-GO (Grand Opportunity; a study funded through an NIH grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act), to examine how brain imaging technology can be used with other tests to measure the progression of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early Alzheimer's disease (AD). ADNI2 seeks to inform the neuroscience of AD. This information will aid in the early detection of AD, and in measuring the effectiveness of treatments in future clinical trials.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UCLA UC Davis UCSF

  • Helping patients return to normal life after trauma surgery

    “This study will recognize and help with physical and emotional post-injury concerns.”

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The overarching goal of this UH2-UH3 proposal is to work with the NIH Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory to develop and implement a large scale, cluster randomized pragmatic clinical trial demonstration project that directly informs national trauma care system policy targeting injured patients with presentations of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and related comorbidity. Each year in the United States (US), over 30 million individuals present to trauma centers, emergency departments, and other acute care medical settings for the treatment of physical injuries. Multiple chronic conditions including enduring PTSD, alcohol and drug use problems, depression and associated suicidal ideation, pain and somatic symptom amplification, and chronic medical conditions (e.g., hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes, and pulmonary diseases) are endemic among physical trauma survivors with and without traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Evidence-based, collaborative care/care management treatment models for PTSD and related comorbidities exist. These care management models have the potential to be flexibly implemented in order to prevent the development of chronic PTSD and depressive symptoms, alcohol use problems, and enduring physical disability in survivors of both TBI and non-TBI injuries; care management models may also be effective in mitigating the impact of the acute injury event on symptom exacerbations in the large subpopulation of injury survivors who already carry a substantial pre-injury burden of multiple chronic medical conditions.

    at UC Davis UCLA

  • Impact of Combined Behavioral Interventions on Cognitive Outcomes in MCI

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Vast evidence supports use of physical exercise and cognitive stimulation for lowering risk for cognitive decline and dementia, with combinations of non-pharmacological interventions providing greatest promise for impacting cognitive aging. This, paired with limited cognitive benefits from pharmacological interventions in dementia, has shifted focus to non-pharmacological interventions administered earlier in the disease course. This application, therefore, proposes a randomized controlled trial (RCT; 12-week active intervention, 3- and 6-month follow-up) comparing 3 conditions: walking program (guided progressive increases in weekly step counts), computer-based cognitive training program (Brain HQ, Posit Science), and combination of the exercise and cognitive program, on cognitive, functional, and diagnostic outcomes in 60 sedentary, community-dwelling adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

    at UCSD

  • The Study of Nasal Insulin in the Fight Against Forgetfulness (SNIFF)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    An urgent need exists to find effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) that can arrest or reverse the disease at its earliest stages. The emotional and financial burden of AD to patients, family members, and society is enormous, and is predicted to grow exponentially as the median population age increases. Current FDA-approved therapies are modestly effective at best. This study will examine a novel therapeutic approach using intranasal insulin (INI) that has shown promise in short-term clinical trials. If successful, information gained from the study has the potential to move INI forward rapidly as a therapy for AD. The study will also provide evidence for the mechanisms through which INI may produce benefits by examining key cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and hippocampal/entorhinal atrophy. These results will have considerable clinical and scientific significance, and provide therapeutically-relevant knowledge about insulin's effects on AD pathophysiology. Growing evidence has shown that insulin carries out multiple functions in the brain, and that insulin dysregulation may contribute to AD pathogenesis. This study will examine the effects of intranasally-administered insulin on cognition, entorhinal cortex and hippocampal atrophy, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) or mild AD. It is hypothesized that after 12 months of treatment with INI compared to placebo, subjects will improve performance on a global measure of cognition, on a memory composite and on daily function. In addition to the examination of CSF biomarkers and hippocampal and entorhinal atrophy, the study aims to examine whether baseline AD biomarker profile, gender, or Apolipoprotein epsilon 4 (APOE-ε4) allele carriage predict treatment response. In this study, 240 people with aMCI or AD will be given either INI or placebo for 12 months, following an open-label period of 6 months where all participants will be given active drug. The study uses insulin as a therapeutic agent and intranasal administration focusing on nose to brain transport as a mode of delivery.

    at UC Irvine

  • Traumatic Brain Injury and Risk for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The project is designed to assess early diagnosis of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a neurobehavioral syndrome manifested by failed relationships, marriages, and businesses, emotional disturbances, depression, alcohol and substance abuse, and suicide attempts and completions. CTE typically begins after a latency period of several years following single or repeated Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs). A history of cerebral concussion may or may not be present. This study builds upon prior work at UCLA using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to identify normal and abnormal functional patterns in the brain by studying persons with a history of TBI including but not limited to: amateur and professional athletes, active and veteran members of the armed forces, as well as victims of motor vehicle and work accidents, and physical battery/domestic violence. This project aims to expand these findings to the population at large. Identification of the syndrome is critical for identifying potential individuals who are most likely to benefit from potential prevention and treatment.

    at UCLA

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