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Mild Cognitive Impairment clinical trials at University of California Health

22 in progress, 12 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Clinical Trial of AAV2-BDNF Gene Therapy in Early Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    open to eligible people ages 50-80

    This is a first-in-human clinical trial to test whether a protein administered into the brain continuously by gene therapy, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), will slow or prevent cell loss in the brains of people affected by Alzheimer's disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment. The protein may also activate cells in the brain that have not yet deteriorated. Gene therapy refers to the use of a harmless virus to have brain cells make the potentially protective protein, BDNF.

    at UCSD

  • A Study of Senicapoc in Alzheimer’s Disease

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 55-85

    Development of novel disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains of paramount importance. This study will be a Phase II randomized clinical trial testing Senicapoc in patients with mild or prodromal AD. This will be a small Proof of Mechanism study to prove biological activity and target engagement in humans with early AD. The investigators will study up to 55 patients over 52 weeks, with primary outcomes being Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog) scores and blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of neuroinflammation. This pilot study will provide an estimate of treatment effect size on cognitive trajectory, daily function, and brain atrophy.

    at UC Davis

  • Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 3 (ADNI3) Protocol

    open to eligible people ages 55-90

    Since its launch in 2004, the overarching aim of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has been realized in informing the design of therapeutic trials in AD. ADNI3 continues the previously funded ADNI-1, ADNI-GO, and ADNI-2 studies that have been combined public/private collaborations between academia and industry to determine the relationships between the clinical, cognitive, imaging, genetic and biochemical biomarker characteristics of the entire spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The overall goal of the study is to continue to discover, optimize, standardize, and validate clinical trial measures and biomarkers used in AD research.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy for Mild Cognitive Impairment

    open to eligible people ages 55 years and up

    The number of older Veterans with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) seeking care within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is increasing and is expected to increase more rapidly as Vietnam era Veterans age. The cognitive effects of MCI and subsequent neurodegenerative disorders can adversely affect a Veteran's ability to function independently and failure to provide appropriate intervention can result in an increased need for healthcare services and VA benefits in the future. The VA currently spends over $19,000 annually per patient to care for Veterans with dementia (Zhu et al., 2009), and delaying the onset of dementia even by one to two years will result in substantial financial savings to the VA and quality of life gains for the Veteran. Since present pharmacological interventions have demonstrated limited efficacy, alternative treatments are needed. Therefore, an evidence-based cognitive training intervention that optimally addresses the needs of older Veterans with MCI is of critical importance to the VA patient care mission.

    at UCSD

  • Deep Brain Stimulation With LIFUP for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    open to eligible people ages 55 years and up

    The purpose of the proposed study is to determine the feasibility of brief brain stimulation, using a device called Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Pulsation (LIFUP), for persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild (early-stage) Alzheimer's disease (AD). As a secondary aim, the investigators will explore whether this brief intervention is associated with improvements in cognitive functioning immediately and one week following the intervention. Subjects will be randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: either the LIFUP administration will be designed to increase the activity of neurons in a certain part of the brain or decrease the activity of neurons. The investigators will study up to 8 subjects with MCI or mild AD. Initially, subjects will undergo a screening assessment with a study physician to determine medical and psychiatric history, establish AD diagnosis, and undergo a blood draw, if standard recent labs for dementia and EKG are unavailable. Subjects that meet criteria and agree to participate in the study will undergo a follow-up visit. In the baseline measurement visit, participants will first undergo neuropsychological testing. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of two LIFUP pulsing paradigms. Participants will then be administered four successive LIFUP treatments while the participants are in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixty minutes following the administration, participants will undergo a second neuropsychological test. A final follow-up assessment will be administered at one week.

    at UCLA

  • Living Alone in Old Age With Cognitive Impairment

    open to eligible people ages 55 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to better understand the experience of living alone in older age with cognitive impairment. We recruit adults 55+ living alone with cognitive impairment such as Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment. This study investigates the priorities and concerns of older adults living alone with cognitive impairment. Participants are interviewed 5 times for one hour in their homes within 3 months at a time that works for them.

    at UCSF

  • Longitudinal Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease Study Protocol

    open to eligible people ages 40-64

    The Longitudinal Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease Study (LEADS) is a non-randomized, natural history, non-treatment study designed to look at disease progression in individuals with early onset cognitive impairment. Clinical, cognitive, imaging, biomarker, and genetic characteristics will be assessed across three cohorts: (1) early onset Alzheimer's Disease (EOAD) participants, (2) early onset non-Alzheimer's Disease (EOnonAD) participants, and (3) cognitively normal (CN) control participants.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Multi-domain Online Therapeutic Investigation Of Neurocognition (MOTION)

    open to eligible people ages 55 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of three on-line wellness interventions for improving physical and cognitive function and brain connectivity in adults who are at least 55 years old and are experiencing symptoms of memory and/or cognitive difficulties.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Network-targeted Theta-burst Stimulation for Episodic Memory Improvement in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    open to eligible people ages 55-90

    The purpose of this study is to see if stimulation of the brain can improve memory. The investigators will use a device called transcranial magnetic stimulation that can stimulate and activate a specific part of the brain that is important for memory. The study will enroll MCI subjects who will be randomly assigned to receive active or sham brain stimulation. 'Blinded' or 'sham-controlled' means that the subject will not know whether the treatment they receive is the active treatment or the non-active stimulation. In the 'sham' condition, the stimulator will turn on but will not actually be stimulating the target brain region.

    at UCLA

  • Neurofeedback to Improve Working Memory in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    open to eligible people ages 50-85

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has been identified as an early phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder expected to affect 13.9 million Americans by 2060. AD causes a progressive cognitive decline, including problems related to learning and memory, that adversely affects life quality. Treatment intervention at the MCI stage of the disease could potentially slow down the rate at which people may convert from MCI to AD. Increasing evidence suggests that abnormal activity in frontal regions of the brain is associated with cognitive deficits observed in AD. Furthermore, previous research has shown that neurofeedback (NFB) training targeting these regions can improve memory, making it a potential treatment for AD. NFB is a technique where an individual learns to change his/her brain function in a particular direction, once that function has been made accessible through a visual or auditory metaphor. We are proposing a novel, computer-based brain-training program to enhance frontal gamma oscillatory activity in individuals with MCI. Results from this study will build the scientific foundation necessary for larger clinical trials dedicated to improving treatment options and outcomes for patients with MCI.

    at UCSD

  • Phase II Trial of Tesamorelin for Cognition in Aging HIV-Infected Persons

    open to eligible people ages 40 years and up

    The aim of this study is to test whether tesamorelin, in combination with a text-messaging application to help with motivation and adherence, will significantly improve memory and thinking in HIV.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Sleep-SMART for Veterans

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) is the first-line treatment for chronic insomnia. However, cognitive impairments may limit progress in CBT-I for older Veterans with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). This study will develop and pilot test Sleep-SMART (Sleep Symptom Management and Rehabilitation Therapy), an adapted CBT-I treatment that incorporates Cognitive Symptom Management and Rehabilitation Therapy (CogSMART) principles with a goal of improving sleep treatment and rehabilitation outcomes for Veterans with co-occurring MCI and insomnia. The innovation of this study centers on enhancing CBT-I by providing supportive cognitive strategies designed to improve treatment adherence, learning, and acceptability. The investigators anticipate that by improving sleep it can concurrently improve daily functioning, increase quality of life, prevent or reduce late-life disability, and mitigate long-term cognitive decline in this Veteran population.

    at UCSD

  • Efficacy of a Multimodal Brain Health Intervention for Older African Americans

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study tests the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a multimodal intervention (walking, social engagement, and reminiscence), including the use of wearable digital biomarkers, for cognitively healthy and mildly cognitively impaired African Americans aged 65 and older.

    at UC Davis

  • Enhancing Cognitive Control in Mild Cognitive Impairment Via Non-invasive Brain Stimulation

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The overall goal of this project is to improve cognitive control abilities in adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) through a form of non-invasive brain stimulation, transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS).

    at UCSF

  • Feasibility of Gamma Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation to Reduce Beta-amyloid Load and Improve Memory

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This project will assess the feasibility of transcranial alternating current stimulation in the gamma band to lower beta-amyloid load and improve memory performance.

    at UCSF

  • In-Home Technology for Caregivers of People With Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment: Rural Homes

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study aims to develop, evaluate, and commercialize an in-home supportive technology that is designed to alleviate anxiety, burden, and loneliness in spousal and familial caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease, other dementias, or mild cognitive impairment in rural homes.

    at UCSF

  • In-Home Technology for Caregivers of People With Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment: Spanish Language Homes

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study aims to develop, evaluate, and commercialize an in-home supportive technology that is designed to alleviate anxiety, burden, and loneliness in spousal and familial caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease, other dementias, or mild cognitive impairment in Spanish language homes.

    at UCSF

  • In-Home Technology for Caregivers of People With Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment: Wearables

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study aims to develop, evaluate, and commercialize an in-home supportive technology that is designed to alleviate anxiety, burden, and loneliness in spousal and familial caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease, other dementias, or mild cognitive impairment by integrating wearable devices (e.g., Apple Watches).

    at UCSF

  • Longitudinal Observational Biomarker Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to test whether treatment-resistant late life depression is associated with declines in memory and attention and brain structure and function.

    at UCLA

  • Nicotinamide as an Early Alzheimer's Disease Treatment

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this research study is to test whether nicotinamide, also known as vitamin B3 or niacinamide, taken in high doses, can reduce phosphorylation of tau (the protein that accumulates in neurofibrillary tangles) in people with Mild Cognitive Impairment or mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia.

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • The Active Mind Trial: An Adaptive Randomized Trial to Improve Function and Delay Dementia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Older adults at risk for dementia show a variety of cognitive deficits, which can be ameliorated by different cognitive training (CT) exercises. The best combination of CT exercises is unknown. The aim is to discover the most efficacious combination of CT exercises as compared to cognitive stimulation (which will serve as a stringent, active control) to modify the functional trajectories of older adults' with MCI, who are at high risk for dementia. The primary objective of the U01 phase is to design and pilot-test an adaptive, randomized clinical trial (RCT) of cognitive training (CT) combinations aimed to enhance performance of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) among persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The longitudinal endpoint goal is reducing incident dementia. The primary aim of the study is to determine which CT combination has the best probability to delay dementia by producing the largest IADL improvements. The study further aims to explore neuroimaging and novel blood-based biomarkers.

    at UCSF

  • The Digital Memory Notebook: Training to Improve Everyday Functioning in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Compensatory aids (e.g., alarms, calendars) play an important supporting role when completing everyday tasks (e.g., appointments, medication management), and there is a growing body of scientific work suggesting that compensatory training improves daily functioning. However, traditional paper-based calendars and to-do-lists have limitations related to accumulation of information, difficulty retrieving information, and remembering to complete activities. Such limitations may be overcome using a digital format through organized digital files, search functions, and alarms. This pilot project proposes to train older adults at risk for cognitive decline to use the Digital Memory Notebook (DMN), a tablet-based application (app), to support everyday functioning. The primary goal is to obtain preliminary evidence that a 6-week, individual and group-based DMN training intervention results in demonstrable changes in target behaviors (e.g., goal-directed DMN use to support everyday activities) among older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and subjective cognitive complaints (SCC). Participants will complete a curriculum involving 2-hour weekly sessions for 6-weeks. Each week will cover a specific function of the DMN and will include standardized goal-setting and weekly homework targets. Following the 6-week intervention, participants will continue to use the DMN app for 4-weeks to evaluate stability. Participants will complete a questionnaire packet 1 week prior to the 6-week intervention, 1 week after the 6-week intervention, and 5 weeks following the 6-week intervention. MCI and SCC participants will complete separate 6-week individual or group interventions spaced two months apart at UCD.

    at UC Davis

Our lead scientists for Mild Cognitive Impairment research studies include .

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