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Sleep Disorders clinical trials at UC Health
35 in progress, 19 open to eligible people

  • A Randomized Controlled Trial of Doxazosin for Nightmares, Sleep Disturbance, and Non-Nightmare Clinical Symptoms in PTSD

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of doxazosin will assess doxazosin's effectiveness for PTSD nightmares, subjective sleep quality, and non-nightmare PTSD symptoms in adult men and women veterans with full and partial-syndromal PTSD.

    at UCSF

  • Adaptive Servo-Ventilation In Acute Heart Failure Patients Protecting the Heart and Kidneys

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary hypothesis of this study is: the use of minute ventilation-adaptive servo-ventilation (MV-ASV) during hospitalization will mitigate deterioration in renal function and prevent kidney injury in patients admitted with acute heart failure (AHF) compared to those receiving usual care. We will validate and extend our pilot study by taking a deeper dive into the effects of ASV on diuretic dose, urine output and new and exciting biomarkers of renal function and kidney injury. If our hypothesis proves correct, it strongly suggests that ASV lessens injury to the kidney and could lead to a new paradigm for the treatment of AHF. When use of high dose of diuretics are anticipated or in whom chronic kidney disease (CKD) or acute kidney injury (AKI) is present on arrival to the Emergency Department, use of MV-ASV might decrease the amount of diuretics needed, allow for continued use of ACE inhibitors, and ultimately mitigate rises in creatinine and decreases in effective glomerular filtration. Since kidney injury is a major factor in those patients with early 30-day readmission following discharge, this therapy could become quite popular.

    at UCSD

  • CBT-I for Veterans With TBI

    open to eligible people ages 18-55

    Many Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn era Veterans have suffered a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), and now cope with multiple post-injury symptoms, including sleep disturbances (especially insomnia). Chronic insomnia in mTBI patients has the potential to exacerbate other symptoms, delay recovery, and negatively affect many of the cognitive, psychological, and neuromuscular sequelae of mTBI, thereby decreasing quality of life. Although Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to be an effective evidence-based treatment for insomnia, there are no published randomized controlled trials evaluating the potential strengths and/or limitations of CBT-I in post-mTBI patients. Therefore, assessing CBT-I in the context of mTBI holds promise to provide substantial benefits in terms of improved rehabilitation outcomes in Veterans who have suffered mTBI.

    at UCSD

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia for Gulf War Illness

    open to all eligible people

    Sleep disturbance is a common complaint of Veterans with Gulf War Illness (GWI). Because there is clinical evidence that sleep quality influences pain, fatigue, mood, cognition, and daily functioning, this study will investigate whether a type of behavioral sleep treatment called Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBTi) can help Gulf War Veterans with GWI. CBTi is a multicomponent treatment where patients learn about sleep and factors affecting sleep as well as how to alter habits that may impair or even prevent sleep. The investigators hypothesize that helping Gulf War Veterans learn how to achieve better sleep with CBTi may also help to alleviate their other non-sleep symptoms of GWI.

    at UCSF

  • Integrated CBT-I and PE on Sleep and PTSD Outcomes (Impact Study)

    open to eligible people ages 19 years and up

    This study aims to examine whether integrating insomnia and PTSD treatment will enhance sleep, PTSD, and quality of life outcomes. This is a randomized control trial comparing integrated evidence based CBT-I into PE (CBTI-PE) versus to a non-active sleep component plus PE (hygiene-PE) to optimize PTSD, sleep, and quality of life outcomes in 90 Veterans. Such benefits would further the VA's commitment to improving the mental health, recovery, and community reintegration of Veterans detailed in the 2014-2020 VHA Strategic Plan. Findings from the proposed study offer a unique opportunity to determine the malleability of mechanisms (e.g., Total sleep time, Sleep efficiency) that can improve recovery outcomes among this vulnerable population and to inform future treatment development and research. Improved PTSD, insomnia, and quality of life outcomes can decrease risk of chronic impairment and ultimately help affected Veterans live richer, more productive lives.

    at UCSD

  • Magnetic Apnea Prevention(MAGNAP) Device to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea:First-In-Human Study of Feasibility and Safety

    open to eligible people ages 21-70

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and feasibility of the Magnap magnetic device in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

    at UCSF

  • Mindfulness Meditation and Insomnia in Alzheimer Disease Caregivers

    open to eligible people ages 45-95

    Treatment of insomnia in caregivers is needed given that 60% of Alzheimer disease caregivers report sleep complaints, and insomnia may add to the burden of AD caregiving and contribute to morbidity and mortality risk. This is the first intervention trial in AD caregivers to target insomnia and also evaluate two mechanisms of chronic disease risk, inflammation and cellular aging

    at UCLA

  • Multimodal Sleep Pathway for Shoulder Arthroplasty

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the efficacy of sleep medicine in the recovery of orthopaedic shoulder arthroplasty patients. The investigators hypothesize that a multimodal sleep pathway including non-pharmacological sleep hygiene interventions and the use of zolpidem can improve patient sleep, pain control, and subsequent recovery after undergoing total shoulder arthroplasty.

    at UCSF

  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea Endotypes and Impact on Phenotypes of People Living With HIV

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The investigators seek to understand how the different underlying causes of OSA affect the way people living with HIV (PLWH) experience OSA. The investigators also want to understand how symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea improve with treatment, and if this too, is affected by the underlying cause of OSA in that individual

    at UCSD

  • Pathophysiology of the Upper Airway in Patients With COPD and Concomitant OSA

    open to eligible people ages 40-70

    The purpose of study is to evaluate the physiologic effects of pulmonary tissue/structural changes associated with COPD and upper airway inflammation on upper airway collapsibility. Upper airway collapsibility is closely associated with development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is a common disease characterized by repetitive collapse of upper airway during sleep, leading to hypoxemia and arousal. OSA has important neurocognitive and cardiovascular consequences, especially in patients with COPD. Participants in this research study will undergo two overnight sleep studies (PSGs), pulmonary function test, and CT scan of the upper airway and chest. The first sleep study will evaluate the sleep breathing disorder and the second sleep study will measure the upper airway collapsibility, called critical closing pressure (Pcrit). Pcrit is measured by a modified continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine which can provide a wide range of pressures between 20 and -20 cmH2O in order to modify upper airway pressure.

    at UCSD

  • Pharmacokinetics of Understudied Drugs Administered to Children Per Standard of Care

    open to eligible people ages up to 21 years

    Understudied drugs will be administered to children per standard of care as prescribed by their treating caregiver and only biological sample collection during the time of drug administration will be involved. A total of approximately 7000 children aged <21 years who are receiving these drugs for standard of care will be enrolled and will be followed for up a maximum of 90 days. The goal of this study is to characterize the pharmacokinetics of understudied drugs for which specific dosing recommendations and safety data are lacking. The prescribing of drugs to children will not be part of this protocol. Taking advantage of procedures done as part of routine medical care (i.e. blood draws) this study will serve as a tool to better understand drug exposure in children receiving these drugs per standard of care. The data collected through this initiative will also provide valuable pharmacokinetic and dosing information of drugs in different pediatric age groups as well as special pediatric populations (i.e. obese).

    at UCSD UCLA

  • Remote Sleep Apnea Management

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Although obstructive sleep apnea, a breathing disorder during sleep, is prevalent and recognized as a major public health concern, most Veterans with this disorder are undiagnosed and therefore untreated. Access to sleep laboratories for testing is limited particularly for those Veterans living in rural areas and Veterans with disabilities that prevent travel to a sleep center. The goal of this study is to compare a web-based telehealth management strategy to in-person management. The telehealth pathway will enable Veterans to be diagnosed and treated without visiting a sleep center. The investigators believe that telehealth management will increase Veterans' access to this specialized care at a cost that is less than in-person delivery but with similar improvements in daytime function.

    at UCSD

  • Self-Management of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Settings

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major chronic condition affecting the quality of life of millions of Americans. Per the Institute of Medicine new treatment adherence strategies are needed to help improve the quality of care, reduce social and economic costs, and help those with chronic conditions, including OSA, live healthier and more productive lives through better management of their conditions. Adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is disappointingly low, and new methods to increase both the use and efficacy of therapy are needed. Historically, patients have not been formally instructed to adjust their pressure settings on their PAP devices; practically, however, allowing patients to adjust their pressure settings fosters engagement, self-confidence, and control with therapy.

    at UCSD

  • Sleep Without Insomnia or The Use of Chronic Hypnotics

    open to eligible people ages 55 years and up

    Sleeping medications, called hypnotics, are often prescribed for insomnia and are associated with adverse health outcomes in older adults. Response rates to hypnotic discontinuation programs are often inadequate, and many patients eventually resume use of hypnotics, suggesting that other mechanisms need to be targeted to achieve and sustain high rates of non-use. Current programs focus on the tapering of hypnotics and/or the treatment of insomnia symptoms. These programs employ strategies such as supervised gradual taper, cognitive behavioral therapy targeting hypnotic withdrawal, and/or cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Evidence suggests that another mechanism involving "placebo" effects may be a viable target for achieving and sustaining higher discontinuation rates. Cognitive expectancies play a key role in producing placebo effects, which are characterized as real improvements in sleep arising from psychosocial aspects of treatment rather than drug effects alone. In this study, investigators are comparing two programs for discontinuing hypnotic medications-a program that addresses placebo effects associated with hypnotic use and a program that does not address these effects.

    at UCLA

  • The Effect of Melatonin on Sleep and Ventilatory Control in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    open to eligible males ages 18-70

    Our hypothesis is that oxidative stress induced during repeated apneas in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients alters the neural control of breathing which destabilizes ventilatory control and exacerbates OSA. Thus antioxidant treatment has the potential to reduce OSA severity. Melatonin is a hormone which regulates sleep patterns, but it is also a potent antioxidant. Melatonin production is suppressed when the eyes register light so people with healthy sleep exhibit a peak in blood serum levels around 2am which then decreases towards morning. OSA patients exhibit lower melatonin levels with a later peak around 6am which then extends later into the day. This abnormal pattern is thought to compound difficulty falling asleep and daytime mental fatigue. Therefore the potential benefits of melatonin treatment in OSA patients are two-fold: most importantly via its antioxidant actions melatonin may reduce chemoreflex sensitivity, stabilize ventilatory control and reduce OSA severity; by normalizing sleep phase melatonin may also allow patients to fall asleep easier and wake more refreshed.

    at UCSD

  • The Pathogenesis of OSA in People Living With HIV

    open to eligible people ages 40-79

    The purpose of this study is to help us understand how HIV and/or Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) may predispose individuals to Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The traditional risk factors for OSA are weight and age. However, people living with HIV on ART seem to have OSA even when they are thin and young. The study involves a detailed physiological sleep study and an MRI of the head and neck to understand the underlying cause of OSA in those with and without HIV.

    at UCSD

  • Tissue-specific Insulin Resistance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Role of Hypoxia

    open to eligible people ages 40-70

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition associated with significant adverse health outcomes. Our overarching hypothesis is that patients with OSA and hypoxia (H-OSA) have greater degrees of insulin resistance in both liver and adipose tissue when compared to those without hypoxia (NH-OSA) thus leading to increased risk for the development of diabetes in the former group.

    at UCSF

  • Whole Body Vibration for OSA

    open to eligible people ages 21-60

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a serious medical condition which is increasing in the United States and significantly increases risks for other diseases, morbidity and mortality. The most common treatment for OSA is CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure), but this intervention has low patient compliance, significant expense ($800-2,000/set), and high inconvenience. Whole Body Vibration (WBV) training is a novel OSA intervention which could have higher patient compliance, low expense, and potentially lower morbidity and mortality and improved quality of life in this increasing patient population.

    at UCLA

  • Yoga During Chemotherapy Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This proposal aims to expand non-pharmacologic options for the control of symptoms during chemotherapy using yoga practices. It is particularly focused on sleep disturbance with a secondary focus on fatigue.

    at UCSF

  • Brief Behavioral Insomnia Treatment Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a brief, behavioral treatment for insomnia is effective in addressing social and occupational functioning and overall health among Veterans with insomnia disorder.

    at UCSF

  • Chronic Moderate Sleep Restriction in Older Adults

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Higher rates of mortality have been found both in short sleepers (< 6 hr/night) and long sleepers (> 8 hr/night), but there has been little experimental investigation of the effects of chronic, moderate sleep loss in long or average sleepers. Some scientists argue that older adults might be particularly vulnerable to negative effects of sleep loss, whereas other scientists argue that many older adults spend too much time in bed, and that moderate reduction of time-in-bed could help increase the quality of their sleep, and could even promote health and longevity, particularly in long sleepers. At 4 sites across the US, we will conduct a large (200 people), randomized, controlled, 5- year study to examine whether a 1-hour reduction of time spent in bed for 12 weeks has negative or positive effects on multiple health-related outcomes, including inflammation, sleepiness, body weight, mood, glucose regulation, quality of life, incidence of illness, and incidence of automobile accidents in older long sleepers as compared to older average sleepers.

    at UCLA

  • Effects of Upper Airway Muscle Training on OSA

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by recurrent collapse of the upper airway during sleep. OSA patients have a small upper airway that is kept patent during wakefulness by a compensatory increase in upper airway (UA) dilator muscle (e.g. genioglossus) activity. At sleep onset this compensation is reduced or lost, resulting in upper airway narrowing or collapse. Previous studies of upper airway muscle training showed variable results on OSA, but so far there has not been any practical, long-term, systematic upper airway muscle training developed or studied as the treatment of OSA. In theory, strengthening the upper airway muscle with exercise training in theory helps maintain a patent airway during sleep. Therefore, investigators aim to test the hypothesis: 1) UA muscle training can improve sleep apnea in some patients with OSA, including those already receiving treatment with PAP or oral appliance therapy. 2) Muscle training is a viable therapy for a definable subset of OSA patients. Investigators hypothesize that patients with OSA who have mild or moderately compromised upper airway anatomy will benefit the most. 3)There will be a positive association between the changes in muscle function and improvement in OSA severity.

    at UCSD

  • Extracellular microRNA: Biomarkers of Endothelial Dysfunction in Obese Adolescents & Adults With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Using a prospective observational approach and a clinical trial design comparing the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure to diet and exercise, investigators plan to evaluate how obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) leads to endothelial dysfunction in adolescents and young adults and whether treatment of OSA can improve endothelial dysfunction. Concurrently, investigators will measure miR 92a/miR 210 levels in all subjects at baseline and following therapy to determine whether miR 92a/miR 210 levels reliably predict endothelial dysfunction in patients and responses to therapy.

    at UCSD

  • Improving Older Adults' Decision Making for OSAT

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This study evaluates the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial that tests a patient decision aid for obstructive sleep apnea in older adults with newly-diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea treated in an outpatient sleep clinic. Half of the participants will use a patient decision aid, while the other half will receive general information about sleep.

    at UCLA

  • nuMoM2b Heart Health Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is looking at the relationship between experiences during pregnancy and cardiovascular health 2 to 3½ years later. The investigators are recruiting women from the approximately 10,000 women who were enrolled and followed over the course of their first pregnancy in another study.

    at UC Irvine

  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Arousal Threshold in Patients With Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has traditionally been attributed only to a collapsible upper airway. However, it is increasingly recognized that multiple additional non-anatomical mechanisms contribute to the disease. Higher rates of OSA in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than in those without PTSD have been reported however the mechanism behind this increased prevalence has not been investigated. Our hypothesis is that patients with PTSD have a predisposition to OSA due to a lower respiratory arousal threshold (wake up too easily) than patients without PTSD. The goal of this project will be to study and compare the ArTH in patients with PTSD and those without. In addition, we plan to see whether medications can be used to increase the arousal threshold and treat OSA in patients with PTSD.

    at UCSD

  • Research on Expecting Moms and Sleep Therapy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The overarching goal is to utilize a randomized control design to examine efficacy of web-based cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-I) plus treatment as usual compared to treatment as usual alone for insomnia and depression outcomes among pregnant women with insomnia at high risk for depressive relapse/recurrence (n=208).

    at UCSF

  • Right Ventricular Hemodynamics Using Cardiac MRI in Patients COPD and OSA

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The coexistence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the same patient has been termed overlap syndrome, affecting 1% of the U.S. population.The investigators propose to conduct this study that aims: (1) to compare right and left ventricular hemodynamic parameters using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in overlap syndrome vs. COPD only and OSA only; (2) to compare the effects of bi-level positive airway pressure (BPAP) vs. nocturnal oxygen therapy (NOT) on right ventricular (RV) hemodynamics in overlap syndrome. This study will allow us to test the hypothesis: (1) Patients with overlap syndrome have more RV dysfunction than those with COPD only or OSA only; (2) treatment of both hypoxemia and hypercapnia during sleep will improve RV hemodynamics compared with treatment of hypoxemia alone in patients with overlap syndrome.

    at UCSD

  • Sleep for Stroke Management and Recovery Trial

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with positive airway pressure starting shortly after acute ischemic stroke or high risk TIA (1) reduces recurrent stroke, acute coronary syndrome, and all-cause mortality 6 months after the event, and (2) improves stroke outcomes at 3 months in patients who experienced an ischemic stroke.

    at UCSF UCSD UCLA

  • Study of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) and Acupuncture for Insomnia and Related Distress Among Cancer Caregivers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The other aim of this study is to determine which of those two treatments (acupuncture or cognitive behavioral therapy) works better for treating insomnia in Informal Caregivers of cancer patients.

    at UC Irvine

  • Survivorship Care in Reducing Symptoms in Young Adult Cancer Survivors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized clinical trial studies survivorship care in reducing symptoms in young adult cancer survivors. Survivorship care programs that identify the needs of young adult cancer survivors and ways to support them through the years after treatment may help reduce symptoms, such as pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and distress, in young adult cancer survivors.

    at UCLA

  • Suvorexant: A Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonist for Treating Sleep Disturbance in Posttraumatic Stress

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common consequence of combat that can result in trauma-related hyperarousal and sleep disturbances. Poor sleep, one of the most common complaints in Veterans with PTSD, can be distressing, impair concentration and memory, and contribute to physical health conditions, such as metabolic syndrome, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. The orexin neuropeptide system underlies both sleep and stress reactivity. Suvorexant, a drug that reduces orexin, improves sleep in civilians, but has not yet been tested in Veterans with PTSD. This study will test whether suvorexant can improve sleep disturbances and PTSD symptoms in Veterans. Suvorexant may benefit Veterans by improving sleep quickly while also reducing PTSD symptoms over the long term, and with fewer side effects that were common in previous medications used to treat these conditions. Improving Veterans' sleep and PTSD symptoms could lead to better emotional and physical well-being, quality of life, relationships, and functioning.

    at UCSF

  • The Effect of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Its Treatment on Decision Making

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an extremely common disease with inadequately explored neurocognitive consequences. The investigators will study OSA patients before and after treatment to understand how OSA changes decision making abilities, and whether treatment can reverse such cognitive changes. These results could provide deeper insight into how OSA affects decision making either temporarily or permanently, and provide another rationale or motivation for treatment of OSA in adults.

    at UCSD

  • The Impact of Venlafaxine on Apnea Hypopnea Index in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators hypothesis is that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with a low arousal threshold may wake up too early during a respiratory event, before upper airway muscles can be activated to achieve stable ventilation. Thus, strategies to manipulate the respiratory arousal threshold could potentially improve the quality of sleep and sleep disordered breathing. Agents that raise arousal threshold are therefore likely to benefit some patients with OSA. The overall goal of this project is to determine the importance of the arousal threshold in OSA, determine which patients might benefit from a raised arousal threshold, and test this hypothesis by using pharmacological manipulation of the arousal threshold to achieve this goal.

    at UCSD

  • Transoral Daytime Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation in Patients With Simple Snoring

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB) is a spectrum of conditions spanning from Simple Snoring to Severe Sleep apnea. SDB has multiple underlying mechanisms. Some portion of patients have issues with upper airway dilator muscle control; and such patients may be amenable to upper airway muscle training exercises using neuromuscular stimulation techniques. The investigators and others have published on the topic of neuromyopathy in the upper airway, defining a subgroup of OSA patients who may be amenable to training exercises. Based on this background, the investigators seek to test the hypothesis that upper airway tongue muscle training using transoral surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation may have benefits to patients with Simple Snoring.

    at UCSD

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