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Sleep Disorders clinical trials at University of California Health

38 in progress, 22 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Dose Selection Study of Light Therapy for Impaired Sleep in Parkinson’s Disease

    open to eligible people ages 45 years and up

    This study aims to determine the most effective dose of light therapy to improve sleep in people with Parkinson's Disease. Four groups of participants will receive bright-white or dim-red light therapy at different times throughout the day.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • CBT-I for Veterans With TBI

    open to eligible people ages 18-55

    Many Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn era Veterans have suffered a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), and now cope with multiple post-injury symptoms, including sleep disturbances (especially insomnia). Chronic insomnia in mTBI patients has the potential to exacerbate other symptoms, delay recovery, and negatively affect many of the cognitive, psychological, and neuromuscular sequelae of mTBI, thereby decreasing quality of life. Although Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to be an effective evidence-based treatment for insomnia, there are no published randomized controlled trials evaluating the potential strengths and/or limitations of CBT-I in post-mTBI patients. Therefore, assessing CBT-I in the context of mTBI holds promise to provide substantial benefits in terms of improved rehabilitation outcomes in Veterans who have suffered mTBI.

    at UCSD

  • Combination Drug-Therapy for Patients With Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common and associated with many adverse health consequences, but many patients are unable to tolerate standard therapies such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and thus remain untreated. Single-drug therapies have shown promising results in treating sleep apnea, but on average patients have only experienced partial relief. Multi-drug therapy may offer a more effective treatment approach. The goal of this study is to test the effect of combination therapy with three FDA-approved drugs (Diamox [acetazolamide], Lunesta [eszopiclone] +/- Effexor [venlafaxine]) on OSA severity and physiology.

    at UCSD

  • Effect of Myofunctional Therapy on OSA

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    The primary medical therapies for patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea syndrome (OSA) require the use of medical devices on a nightly basis to help control breathing during sleep, which can be difficult for patients with mild-to-moderate disease. Because many patients use these therapies on a limited basis, or stop using them altogether, they continue to be at increased risk of the consequences of untreated OSA. Untreated and undertreated OSA compounds the risk of OSA consequences over time, particularly with increasing age and weight. Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy (OMT) takes a rehabilitative approach to OSA and is comprised of isotonic and isometric exercises that target the oral (e.g., tongue) and oropharyngeal (e.g., soft palate, lateral pharyngeal wall) to help restore normal breathing and airway patency at night while asleep. Should the study have positive findings, OMT could become an important alternative therapy for patients with mild-to-moderate disease because patients could utilize a therapy that improves their nighttime breathing through daytime exercises and without the need for a burdensome medical device.

    at UCSD

  • Integrated CBT-I and PE on Sleep and PTSD Outcomes (Impact Study)

    open to eligible people ages 19 years and up

    This study aims to examine whether integrating insomnia and PTSD treatment will enhance sleep, PTSD, and quality of life outcomes. This is a randomized control trial comparing integrated evidence based CBT-I into PE (CBTI-PE) versus to a non-active sleep component plus PE (hygiene-PE) to optimize PTSD, sleep, and quality of life outcomes in 90 Veterans. Such benefits would further the VA's commitment to improving the mental health, recovery, and community reintegration of Veterans detailed in the 2014-2020 VHA Strategic Plan. Findings from the proposed study offer a unique opportunity to determine the malleability of mechanisms (e.g., Total sleep time, Sleep efficiency) that can improve recovery outcomes among this vulnerable population and to inform future treatment development and research. Improved PTSD, insomnia, and quality of life outcomes can decrease risk of chronic impairment and ultimately help affected Veterans live richer, more productive lives.

    at UCSD

  • Magnetic Apnea Prevention(MAGNAP) Device to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea:First-In-Human Study of Feasibility and Safety

    open to eligible people ages 21-70

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and feasibility of the Magnap magnetic device in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

    at UCSF

  • Mindfulness Meditation and Insomnia in Alzheimer Disease Caregivers

    open to eligible people ages 45-95

    Treatment of insomnia in caregivers is needed given that 60% of Alzheimer disease caregivers report sleep complaints, and insomnia may add to the burden of AD caregiving and contribute to morbidity and mortality risk. This is the first intervention trial in AD caregivers to target insomnia and also evaluate two mechanisms of chronic disease risk, inflammation and cellular aging

    at UCLA

  • National Adaptive Trial for PTSD Related Insomnia

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    Many Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have trouble sleeping or have frequent nightmares. So far, no medication has been approved for treatment of insomnia in PTSD. The purpose of this research study is to find out if taking medications called trazodone, eszopiclone, or gabapentin can help decrease symptoms of insomnia in patients with PTSD. PTSD is a form of intense anxiety which sometimes results from severe trauma. Symptoms may include nightmares, flashbacks, troublesome memories, difficulty sleeping, poor concentration, irritability, anger, and emotional withdrawal. Insomnia is a disorder that can make it hard to fall sleep, stay asleep or cause a person to wake up too early and not be able to fall back to sleep.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea Endotypes and Impact on Phenotypes of People Living With HIV

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The investigators seek to understand how the different underlying causes of OSA affect the way people living with HIV (PLWH) experience OSA. The investigators also want to understand how symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea improve with treatment, and if this too, is affected by the underlying cause of OSA in that individual

    at UCSD

  • Optimizing Post-operative Recovery in Bariatric Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Undergoing Outpatient Surgery: A Comparison of Sugammadex and Neostigmine

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    This study assesses the efficacy of sugammadex against neostigmine for hastening recovery from neuromuscular blockade and optimizing pulmonary function in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea presenting for outpatient surgery. Both drugs are used in anesthesiology to reverse neuromuscular blockade that is given in the setting of inducing and maintaining general anesthesia.

    at UCSD

  • Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Safety Profile of Understudied Drugs Administered to Children Per Standard of Care (POPS)

    open to eligible people ages up to 20 years

    The study investigators are interested in learning more about how drugs, that are given to children by their health care provider, act in the bodies of children and young adults in hopes to find the most safe and effective dose for children. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the PK of understudied drugs currently being administered to children per SOC as prescribed by their treating provider.

    at UCLA

  • Postoperative Neurocognitive Disorders

    open to eligible people ages 40-75

    The purpose of this study is to examine the mechanisms of brain injury contributing to postoperative neurocognitive disorders (PNCD) in an at-risk population (obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)) undergoing surgery. The investigators will enroll 50 OSA patients scheduled for surgery. All patients will have a brain scan (fMRI) within five days before surgery and two days and six months after surgery. During this visit cognitive function will be assessed using the Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning (WRAML2) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) tests. Patients will also be asked to participate in a blood draw during the first 2 visits for fMRI (within five days of surgery and two days after surgery). The Confusion Assessment Method (CAM-S) test, will be used to examine postoperative delirium.

    at UCLA

  • Reaching for Equity in Sleep Apnea Treatment (REST) Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will test a brief telephonic health coaching intervention to improve adherence to positive airway pressure therapy for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    at UCSF

  • remedē System Therapy Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this non-randomized post market study is to collect clinical data on the safety and effectiveness of the remedē System in a real-world setting.

    at UCSF

  • Self-Management of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Settings

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major chronic condition affecting the quality of life of millions of Americans. Per the Institute of Medicine new treatment adherence strategies are needed to help improve the quality of care, reduce social and economic costs, and help those with chronic conditions, including OSA, live healthier and more productive lives through better management of their conditions. Adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is disappointingly low, and new methods to increase both the use and efficacy of therapy are needed. Historically, patients have not been formally instructed to adjust their pressure settings on their PAP devices; practically, however, allowing patients to adjust their pressure settings fosters engagement, self-confidence, and control with therapy.

    at UCSD

  • Sleep for Stroke Management and Recovery Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with positive airway pressure starting shortly after acute ischemic stroke or high risk TIA (1) reduces recurrent stroke, acute coronary syndrome, and all-cause mortality 6 months after the event, and (2) improves stroke outcomes at 3 months in patients who experienced an ischemic stroke.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Suvorexant: A Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonist for Treating Sleep Disturbance in Posttraumatic Stress

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common consequence of combat that can result in trauma-related hyperarousal and sleep disturbances. Poor sleep, one of the most common complaints in Veterans with PTSD, can be distressing, impair concentration and memory, and contribute to physical health conditions, such as metabolic syndrome, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. The orexin neuropeptide system underlies both sleep and stress reactivity. Suvorexant, a drug that reduces orexin, improves sleep in civilians, but has not yet been tested in Veterans with PTSD. This study will test whether suvorexant can improve sleep disturbances and PTSD symptoms in Veterans. Suvorexant may benefit Veterans by improving sleep quickly while also reducing PTSD symptoms over the long term, and with fewer side effects that were common in previous medications used to treat these conditions. Improving Veterans' sleep and PTSD symptoms could lead to better emotional and physical well-being, quality of life, relationships, and functioning.

    at UCSF

  • SweetDreams Sleep Study for Children With Autism

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 60 months

    This proposal will acquire preliminary data on the feasibility and effectiveness of an innovative and scalable strategy for improving access to effective sleep health care for preschool-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The investigators will develop and test an on-line delivery adaptation of the existing behavioral sleep interventions for preschool aged children.

    at UCSF

  • Taking Brain Monitoring to the Next Level

    open to eligible people ages 45-75

    This one arm clinical study will assess the impact of a goal directed therapy intervention, aiming at optimizing depth of anesthesia and intraoperative blood pressure on the incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction and delirium relative to a standardized anesthetic plan. We will enroll 60 patients and will measure the neurocognitive status (MoCA test) of patients before and after surgery (at discharge, within 2 weeks after surgery and 6 months after surgery) to determine the relative impact of anesthetic care on the development of postoperative delirium and cognitive decline. All patients will have a brain scan (fMRI) before and after surgical intervention. Patients will also be asked to participate in an optional blood draw which will take place during their brain imaging visit and post operatively (within 2 days after surgery).

    at UCLA

  • The Pathogenesis of OSA in People Living With HIV

    open to eligible people ages 40-79

    The purpose of this study is to help us understand how HIV and/or Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) may predispose individuals to Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The traditional risk factors for OSA are weight and age. However, people living with HIV on ART seem to have OSA even when they are thin and young. The study involves a detailed physiological sleep study and an MRI of the head and neck to understand the underlying cause of OSA in those with and without HIV.

    at UCSD

  • The Reducing Risk Study

    open to eligible people ages 12-18

    The present study will test an innovative mobile health adaptation of a behavioral intervention that improves sleep and mental health concerns among adolescents.

    at UCSF

  • Tissue-specific Insulin Resistance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Role of Hypoxia

    open to eligible people ages 40-70

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition associated with significant adverse health outcomes. Our overarching hypothesis is that patients with OSA and hypoxia (H-OSA) have greater degrees of insulin resistance in both liver and adipose tissue when compared to those without hypoxia (NH-OSA) thus leading to increased risk for the development of diabetes in the former group.

    at UCSF

  • Adaptive Servo-Ventilation In Acute Heart Failure Patients Protecting the Heart and Kidneys

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary hypothesis of this study is: the use of minute ventilation-adaptive servo-ventilation (MV-ASV) during hospitalization will mitigate deterioration in renal function and prevent kidney injury in patients admitted with acute heart failure (AHF) compared to those receiving usual care. We will validate and extend our pilot study by taking a deeper dive into the effects of ASV on diuretic dose, urine output and new and exciting biomarkers of renal function and kidney injury. If our hypothesis proves correct, it strongly suggests that ASV lessens injury to the kidney and could lead to a new paradigm for the treatment of AHF. When use of high dose of diuretics are anticipated or in whom chronic kidney disease (CKD) or acute kidney injury (AKI) is present on arrival to the Emergency Department, use of MV-ASV might decrease the amount of diuretics needed, allow for continued use of ACE inhibitors, and ultimately mitigate rises in creatinine and decreases in effective glomerular filtration. Since kidney injury is a major factor in those patients with early 30-day readmission following discharge, this therapy could become quite popular.

    at UCSD

  • Advancing Understanding of Transportation Options

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This Stage II randomized, controlled, longitudinal trial seeks to assess the acceptability, feasibility, and effects of a driving decision aid use among geriatric patients and providers. This multi-site trial will (1) test the driving decision aid (DDA) in improving decision making and quality (knowledge, decision conflict, values concordance and behavior intent); and (2) determine its effects on specific subpopulations of older drivers (stratified for cognitive function, decisional capacity, and attitudinally readiness for a mobility transition). The overarching hypotheses are that the DDA will help older adults make high-quality decisions, which will mitigate the negative psychosocial impacts of driving reduction, and that optimal DDA use will target certain populations and settings.

    at UCSD

  • Apnea and Insomnia Relief Study

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a behavioral sleep treatment improves functioning and sleep in Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    at UCSF

  • Applying Best Clinical Practices to Patients at High Risk of Respiratory Complications

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to: 1. Perform a retrospective analysis on data contained in the UCLA Perioperative Data Warehouse on the incidence of respiratory dysfunction in the post-operative care unit (PACU) before and after the introduction of sugammadex into clinical practice. 2. Develop and implement a clinical best practice pathway designed to prevent postoperative respiratory complications in higher risk patients (such as those with OSA or preexisting respiratory disease) using education and clinical decision support in patients.

    at UCLA

  • CBT-I or Zolpidem/Trazodone for Insomnia

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study is a randomized (1:1:1) comparative effectiveness trial of medication (zolpidem or trazodone), cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), and the combination (medication + CBT-I) for the treatment of chronic insomnia in men and women aged 18-80 living in rural areas with 1 year of follow-up. A total of 1200 participants will be enrolled and randomized in the United States. This trial is funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute.

    at UCSF

  • Digital Behavioral Therapy for Sleep Problems

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Insomnia is very common, especially in HIV population (up to 73%), and contributes to the development of other conditions such as depression, dementia, inflammation, obesity, and heart diseases. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is known to improve insomnia. However, it has never been tested in HIV-positive patients. The investigators aim to examine the Internet version of this therapy in HIV-positive patients because the availability of CBT-I is very limited while the cost is high. The investigators will test this internet version, also called digital CBT-I (dCBTI), against sleep hygiene education (SHE), a commonly prescribed set of instructions in clinical practice, in 60 HIV-positive patients with insomnia invited from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) Los Angeles site. The investigators aim to test if dCBTI or SHE improves insomnia in this patient group. This trial involves a behavioral treatment that can be done from home with minimal side effects and includes neither medications nor invasive interventions. Lastly, this trial will provide important pilot data for a larger trial testing long-term effects of insomnia treatment in HIV-positive patients.

    at UCLA

  • Do Endotypes Predict Response and Sequelae in OSA Patients

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study will investigate why some people have Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and how the underlying cause may relate to OSA manifestations (including sleepiness and high blood pressure) and response to different therapeutic approaches (ie CPAP, eszopiclone, and supplemental oxygen). Understanding why someone has OSA could affect how best to treat that individual, but may also have an impact on what problems the disease might cause.

    at UCSD

  • Extracellular microRNA: Biomarkers of Endothelial Dysfunction in Obese Adolescents & Adults With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Using a prospective observational approach and a clinical trial design comparing the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure to diet and exercise, investigators plan to evaluate how obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) leads to endothelial dysfunction in adolescents and young adults and whether treatment of OSA can improve endothelial dysfunction. Concurrently, investigators will measure miR 92a/miR 210 levels in all subjects at baseline and following therapy to determine whether miR 92a/miR 210 levels reliably predict endothelial dysfunction in patients and responses to therapy.

    at UCSD

  • Gabapentin and Tizanidine for Insomnia in Chronic Pain

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover trial aimed at assessing the effect of gabapentin and tizanidine, two pain medications, on insomnia in chronic pain patients.

    at UCSD

  • Language of Sleepiness

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Subjects will complete an electronic consent form and then fill out questionnaires on a tablet computer. The answers to the questions will be recorded to a secure electronic database, along with the results of a clinical overnight sleep study performed separately from this research study (this research study will not perform any overnight visits). After the overnight study diagnosis researchers will see which answers are most commonly given in association with each diagnosis. In addition, we will assess to what extent the sleep disorder impacts the patient's perception of his/her quality of life.

    at UCSD

  • nuMoM2b Heart Health Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is looking at the relationship between experiences during pregnancy and cardiovascular health 2 to 3½ years later. The investigators are recruiting women from the approximately 10,000 women who were enrolled and followed over the course of their first pregnancy in another study.

    at UC Irvine

  • Prospective Randomized Trial of CPAP for SDB in Patients Who Use Opioids

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Patients with chronic pain who use opioids appear to be at increased risk for breathing issues during sleep, termed sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Treatment of SDB often consists of use of a device during sleep that provides continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via a mask interface. The goal of this study is to determine whether patients with chronic pain who use opioids and have SDB might benefit from the use of CPAP in terms of sleep quality, pain, quality of life, and other measures. In addition, the study will examine whether these individuals are able to adhere to CPAP, which will be important for future studies. Lastly, we anticipate that CPAP won't work for everyone due to the changes that opioids can cause in breathing patterns. We will examine how often CPAP is ineffective, and whether we can predict which individuals are least likely to resolve their SDB with CPAP.

    at UCSD

  • Sleep Without Insomnia or The Use of Chronic Hypnotics

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Sleeping medications, called hypnotics, are often prescribed for insomnia and are associated with adverse health outcomes in older adults. Response rates to hypnotic discontinuation programs are often inadequate, and many patients eventually resume use of hypnotics, suggesting that other mechanisms need to be targeted to achieve and sustain high rates of non-use. Current programs focus on the tapering of hypnotics and/or the treatment of insomnia symptoms. These programs employ strategies such as supervised gradual taper, cognitive behavioral therapy targeting hypnotic withdrawal, and/or cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Evidence suggests that another mechanism involving "placebo" effects may be a viable target for achieving and sustaining higher discontinuation rates. Cognitive expectancies play a key role in producing placebo effects, which are characterized as real improvements in sleep arising from psychosocial aspects of treatment rather than drug effects alone. In this study, investigators are comparing two programs for discontinuing hypnotic medications-a program that addresses placebo effects associated with hypnotic use and a program that does not address these effects.

    at UCLA

  • Sleep-SMART for Veterans

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) is the first-line treatment for chronic insomnia. However, cognitive impairments may limit progress in CBT-I for older Veterans with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). This study will develop and pilot test Sleep-SMART (Sleep Symptom Management and Rehabilitation Therapy), an adapted CBT-I treatment that incorporates Cognitive Symptom Management and Rehabilitation Therapy (CogSMART) principles with a goal of improving sleep treatment and rehabilitation outcomes for Veterans with co-occurring MCI and insomnia. The innovation of this study centers on enhancing CBT-I by providing supportive cognitive strategies designed to improve treatment adherence, learning, and acceptability. The investigators anticipate that by improving sleep it can concurrently improve daily functioning, increase quality of life, prevent or reduce late-life disability, and mitigate long-term cognitive decline in this Veteran population.

    at UCSD

  • The Effect of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Its Treatment on Decision Making

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an extremely common disease with inadequately explored neurocognitive consequences. The investigators will study OSA patients before and after treatment to understand how OSA changes decision making abilities, and whether treatment can reverse such cognitive changes. These results could provide deeper insight into how OSA affects decision making either temporarily or permanently, and provide another rationale or motivation for treatment of OSA in adults.

    at UCSD

  • Underlying Mechanisms of Obesity-induced Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Obesity is a common risk factor for the development of obstructive sleep apnea. However, not all subjects with obesity develop obstructive sleep apnea. This study will attempt to determine the mechanistic drivers between obesity and obstructive sleep apnea.

    at UCSD

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