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Uterine Cancer clinical trials at UC Health
14 in progress, 3 open to new patients

  • An experimental medicine, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin

    “Experimental combination treatment for Cervical, Upper Vaginal, and Uterine Cancers”

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of adavosertib when given together with external beam radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with cervical, vaginal, or uterine cancer. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. External beam radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving adavosertib, external beam radiation therapy, and cisplatin may work better in treating patients with cervical, vaginal, or uterine cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Cabozantinib and Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Advanced, Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib and nivolumab work in treating patients with endometrial that has come back or spread to other places in the body. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib and nivolumab may work better in treating endometrial cancer.

    at UCSD UC Davis

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UC Davis

  • Cabozantinib S-Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib s-malate works in treating patients with endometrial cancer that has come back (recurrent) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Cabozantinib s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and by blocking blood flow to the tumor.

    at UC Davis

  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies carboplatin and paclitaxel to see how well they work with or without cisplatin and radiation therapy in treating patients with stage I-IVA endometrial cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving chemotherapy and radiation therapy after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery. It is not yet known whether carboplatin and paclitaxel are more effective with or without cisplatin and radiation therapy in treating patients with endometrial cancer.

    at UCLA UC Irvine UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Comprehensive Patient Questionnaires in Predicting Complications in Older Patients With Gynecologic Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research trial studies comprehensive patient questionnaires in predicting complications in older patients with gynecologic cancer undergoing surgery. Comprehensive patient questionnaires completed before surgery may help identify complications, such as the need for assistance in taking medications, decreased mobility, decreased social activity, and falls, and may improve outcomes for older patients with gynecologic cancer.

    at UCSD UCLA

  • Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Endometrial or Peritoneal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well dasatinib works in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, endometrial, or peritoneal cancer that has come back or is persistent. Dasatinib may shrink patients' tumors by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

  • Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This clinical trial studies lymphedema after surgery in patients with endometrial cancer, cervical cancer, or vulvar cancer. Collecting information over time about how often lymphedema occurs in patients undergoing surgery and lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancer, cervical cancer, and vulvar cancer may help doctors learn more about the disease and plan the best treatment.

    at UCLA

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin or Ifosfamide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Persistent or Recurrent Uterine, Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies paclitaxel and carboplatin see how well they work compared with paclitaxel and ifosfamide in treating patients with fallopian tube, or peritoneal cavity cancer that is newly diagnosed, persistent, or has come back (recurrent). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, carboplatin, and ifosfamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether paclitaxel is more effective when given with carboplatin or ifosfamide in treating patients with uterine, ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cavity cancer.

    at UCSD UCLA UC Irvine UC Davis UCSF

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III, IV, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well paclitaxel, carboplatin, and metformin hydrochloride works and compares it to paclitaxel, carboplatin, and placebo in treating patients with endometrial cancer that is stage III, IV, or has come back. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Metformin hydrochloride may help paclitaxel and carboplatin work better by making cancer cells more sensitive to the drugs. It is not yet known whether paclitaxel and carboplatin is more effective with or without metformin hydrochloride in treating endometrial cancer.

    at UCSD UCLA UC Irvine UC Davis UCSF

  • Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab or Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Temsirolimus or Ixabepilone, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III, Stage IV, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies paclitaxel, carboplatin, and bevacizumab or paclitaxel, carboplatin, and temsirolimus or ixabepilone, carboplatin, and bevacizumab to see how well they work in treating patients with stage III, stage IV, or recurrent endometrial cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, carboplatin, and ixabepilone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating patients with endometrial cancer.

    at UCSF UCSD UCLA

  • Pelvic Radiation Therapy or Vaginal Implant Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Stage I or Stage II Endometrial Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies pelvic radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with vaginal implant radiation therapy, paclitaxel, and carboplatin in treating patients with high-risk stage I or stage II endometrial cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Implant radiation therapy uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether pelvic radiation therapy alone is more effective than vaginal implant radiation therapy, paclitaxel, and carboplatin in treating patients with endometrial cancer.

    at UCLA UC Irvine UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase II trial studies radiation therapy and cisplatin to see how well they work compared with radiation therapy alone in treating patients with endometrial cancer that has come back. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays and other types of radiation to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving radiation therapy together with cisplatin is more effective than radiation therapy alone in treating patients with endometrial cancer.

    at UCSD UC Davis UCLA

  • Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well sunitinib malate works in treating patients with endometrial cancer that has come back after a period of improvement (recurrent) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Sunitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and by blocking blood flow to the tumor.

    at UC Davis

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