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Ischemic Stroke clinical trials at University of California Health

16 in progress, 8 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • BCI-FES Therapy for Stroke Rehabilitation

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    There are over 7 million stroke survivors in the US alone, with approximately 795,000 new cases annually. Despite the best available physiotherapy, 30-60% of stroke survivors remain affected by difficulty walking, with foot weakness often being the main cause. Given that post-stroke gait impairments remain poorly addressed, new methods that can provide lasting improvements are necessary. Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology may be one such novel approach. BCI technology enables "direct brain control" of external devices such as assistive devices and prostheses by translating brain waves into control signals. When BCI systems are integrated with functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems, they can be used to deliver a novel physical therapy to improve movement after stroke. BCI-FES systems are hypothesized to stimulate recovery after stroke beyond that of conventional physical therapy.

    at UC Irvine

  • Determinants of the Effectiveness of Robot-assisted Hand Movement Training

    open to eligible people ages 18-85

    The investigators would like to investigate the effectiveness of somatosensory training for robot-assisted hand motor rehabilitation after stroke.

    at UC Irvine

  • Multi-arm Optimization of Stroke Thrombolysis

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary efficacy objective of the MOST trial is to determine if argatroban (100µg/kg bolus followed by 3µg/kg per minute for 12 hours) or eptifibatide (135µg/kg bolus followed by 0.75µg/kg/min infusion for two hours) results in improved 90-day modified Rankin scores (mRS) as compared with placebo in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients treated with standard of care thrombolysis (0.9mg/kg IV rt-PA or 0.25mg/kg IV tenecteplase or TNK) within three hours of symptom onset. Patients may also receive endovascular thrombectomy (ET) per usual care. Time of onset is defined as the last time the patient was last known to be well.

    at UC Irvine UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • MultiStem® Administration for Stroke Treatment and Enhanced Recovery Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 3 study to examine the safety and effectiveness of the allogeneic, adult stem cell investigational product, MultiStem, in adults who have suffered an acute ischemic stroke in the previous 18-36 hours.

    at UCLA

  • Sleep for Stroke Management and Recovery Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with positive airway pressure starting shortly after acute ischemic stroke or high risk TIA (1) reduces recurrent stroke, acute coronary syndrome, and all-cause mortality 6 months after the event, and (2) improves stroke outcomes at 3 months in patients who experienced an ischemic stroke.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • NOninVasive Intracranial prEssure From Transcranial doppLer Ultrasound Development of a Comprehensive Database of Multimodality Monitoring Signals for Brain-Injured Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an observational study in neurocritical care units at University of California San Francisco Medical Center (UCSFMC), Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital (ZSFGH), and Duke University Medical Center. In this study, the investigators will primarily use the monitor mode of the Transcranial Doppler (TCD, non-invasive FDA approved device) to record cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) signals from the Middle Cerebral Artery and Internal Carotid Artery. TCD data and intracranial pressure (ICP) data will be collected in the following four scenarios. Each recording is up to 60 minutes in length. Multimodality high-resolution physiological signals will be collected from brain injured patients: traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage, liver failure, and ischemic stroke. This is not a hypothesis-driven study but rather a signal database development project with a goal to collect multimodality brain monitoring data to support development and validation of algorithms that will be useful for future brain monitoring devices. In particular, the collected data will be used to support: Development and validation of noninvasive intracranial pressure (nICP) algorithms. Development and validation of continuous monitoring of neurovascular coupling state for brain injury patients Development and validation of noninvasive approaches of detecting elevated ICP state. Development and validation of approaches to determine most likely causes of ICP elevation. Development and validation of approaches to detect acute cerebral hemodynamic response to various neurovascular procedures.

    at UCSF

  • Platelet Expression of FcγRIIa and Arterial Hemodynamics to Predict Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Atherosclerosis

    open to eligible people ages 30 years and up

    An observational study to determine if individuals with increased platelet FcyRIIa will have a higher risk of ischemic events.

    at UCLA

  • Stroke Recovery Initiative - Registry for Stroke Research Studies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The Stroke Recovery Initiative is a nation-wide participant recruitment registry that connects people who have had a stroke with researchers who are working to develop new approaches to improve recovery after stroke.

    at UCSF

  • A Study of Milvexian in Participants After an Acute Ischemic Stroke or High-Risk Transient Ischemic Attack

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether milvexian compared to placebo reduce the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSD

  • A Study to Learn More About Asundexian (Also Called BAY2433334) for Prevention of Ischemic Stroke in Male and Female Participants Aged 18 Years and Older Who Already Had Such a Stroke Due to a Blood Clot That Formed Outside the Heart and Travelled to the Brain, or Temporary Stroke-like Symptoms

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Researchers are looking for a better way to prevent an ischemic stroke which occurs when a blood clot travelled to the brain in people who within the last 72 hours had: - a stroke due to a blood clot that formed outside the heart (acute non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke), or - temporary stroke-like symptoms with a high risk of turning into a stroke (high-risk transient ischemic attack), and who are planned to receive standard of care therapy. Ischemic strokes or transient ischemic attacks result from a blocked or reduced blood flow to a part of the brain. They are caused by blood clots that travel to the brain and block the vessels that supply it. If these blood clots form elsewhere than in the heart, the stroke is called non-cardioembolic. People who already had a non-cardioembolic stroke are more likely to have another stroke. This is why they are treated preventively with an antiplatelet therapy, the current standard of care. Antiplatelet medicines prevent platelets, components of blood clotting, from clumping together. Anticoagulants are another type of medicine that prevents blood clots from forming by interfering with a process known as coagulation (or blood clotting). The study treatment asundexian is a new type of anticoagulant currently under development to provide further treatment options. The way it works, it aims to further improve the standard of care with regard to the risk of bleeding. The main purpose of this study is to learn whether asundexian works better than placebo at reducing ischemic strokes in participants who recently had a non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke or temporary stroke-like symptoms when given in addition to standard antiplatelet therapy. A placebo is a treatment that looks like a medicine but does not have any medicine in it. Another aim is to compare the occurrence of major bleeding events during the study between the asundexian and the placebo group. Major bleedings have a serious or even life-threatening impact on a person's health. Dependent on the treatment group, the participants will either take asundexian or placebo as tablets once a day for at least 3 months up to 31 months. Approximately every 3 months during the treatment period, either a phone call or a visit to the study site is scheduled on an alternating basis. In addition, one visit before and up to two visits after the treatment period are planned. During the study, the study team will: - Check vital signs such as blood pressure and heart rate - Examine the participants' heart health using an electrocardiogram (ECG) - Take blood samples - Ask the participants questions about how they are feeling and what adverse events they are having. An adverse event is any medical problem that a participant has during a study. Doctors keep track of all adverse events that happen in studies, even if they do not think the adverse events might be related to the study treatments. In addition, the participants will be asked to complete a questionnaire on quality of life at certain time points during the study.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA

  • AtRial Cardiopathy and Antithrombotic Drugs In Prevention After Cryptogenic Stroke

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Objectives - Primary: To test the hypothesis that apixaban is superior to aspirin for the prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke and atrial cardiopathy. - Secondary: To test the hypothesis that the relative efficacy of apixaban over aspirin increases with the severity of atrial cardiopathy.

    at UC Irvine UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Intravenous N-Acetylcysteine for the Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability in the developed world. While t-PA and mechanical thrombectomy have been shown to decrease disability in properly selected patients, many patients are left with lifelong symptoms. There are currently limited options available for patients who are not candidates for treatment with t-PA and/or mechanical thrombectomy. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) is an FDA approved antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent that has been used safely for many years in the treatment of acetaminophen overdose. In studies, the oral form has been shown to improve outcomes in acute ischemic stroke and has been shown to decrease the effects of ischemic brain injury in animal models. In a small human trial, it improved outcomes in patients suffering from mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). The intravenous formulation has a long safety record. It is not FDA approved for treating stroke but was reviewed by the FDA and was given an FDA IND for this study. The investigators propose a prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the efficacy of administering intravenous N-acetylcysteine to patients with acute ischemic stroke. Eligible subjects will receive a commercially available form of intravenous NAC (Acetadote®) through for the first 21 hours following their enrollment. Patients enrolled who receive t-PA for thrombolysis will have their intravenous NAC infusion delayed for 24 hours after the completion of their t-PA infusion. Patients undergoing thrombectomy will be excluded from enrollment. Subjects will be evaluated by emergency department and/or division of neurology physicians at the time of enrollment, during their hospitalization, as well as 30 days and 90 days after enrollment. At each visit, subjects will be assessed for functional status and quality of life. This study is designed to compare the efficacy of intravenous N-acetylcysteine compared to normal treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    at UCLA

  • The Efficacy of a Frequency-tuned Electromagnetic Field Treatment in Facilitating the Recovery of Subacute Ischemic Stroke Patients - a Pivotal Study (THE "EMAGINE" STUDY)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This is a multicenter study that will be conducted at approximately 20 centers. BQ 2.0 is a wearable medical device that produces and delivers non-invasive, extremely-low-intensity and low-frequency, frequency-tuned electromagnetic fields in order to stimulate neuronal networks with the aim of reducing disability and promoting neurorecovery. In this study, BQ 2.0 is intended to reduce disability in adult patients with subacute ischemic stroke, with a moderate to severe disability which includes an upper extremity motor impairment. BQ 2.0 will be used for 9 weeks in conjunction with physical and occupational therapy (PT/OT) and periodic supervision (either remote or in person) of a trained site study team member. Treatments may be administered in multiple settings (e.g. acute care hospital (ACH) or inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRF), Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF), home or other outpatient setup). The study will enroll up to 150 adult subjects who will be randomly assigned (1:1 allocation ratio) to either active or sham study intervention using BQ 2.0.

    at UCLA

  • Zero Degree Head Positioning in Hyperacute Large Artery Ischemic Stroke

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Placing the head of bed (HOB) at 0-degrees has been shown in small studies to improve blood flow to the brain in patients with ischemic stroke caused by large artery occlusions, thereby reducing stroke symptom worsening. This simple yet potentially impactful intervention has yet to be tested in a large clinical trial in hyperacute large artery ischemic stroke patients, but may provide nurses with a powerful contribution to acute stroke care that is capable of preventing worsening of stroke symptoms and promoting stabilization. Because stroke is the leading cause of preventable long-term disability in adults, this study may show that simple methods such as 0-degree HOB positioning should be considered one of the very first actions taken in the emergent management of acute ischemic stroke patients.

    at UCLA

  • ASSIST Registry Studying Various Operator Techniques

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this Registry is to assess the procedural success and clinical outcomes associated with various operator techniques for mechanical thrombectomy in large vessel occlusions (LVO).

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • Validation of Early Prognostic Data for Recovery Outcome After Stroke for Future, Higher Yield Trials

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    VERIFY will validate biomarkers of upper extremity (UE) motor outcome in the acute ischemic stroke window for immediate use in clinical trials, and explore these biomarkers in acute intracerebral hemorrhage. VERIFY will create the first multicenter, large-scale, prospective dataset of clinical, transmagnetic stimulation (TMS), and MRI measures in the acute stroke time window.

    at UCLA UCSF

Our lead scientists for Ischemic Stroke research studies include .

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