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Obesity clinical trials at UC Health
53 in progress, 28 open to new patients

  • An ACT-enhanced Weight Management and Fitness Program for Navy Personnel

    open to eligible people ages 18-69

    The proposed study is a cohort-randomized controlled trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-enhanced ShipShape (ACT+SS) compared to the standard ShipShape-only program, for overweight or obese Navy personnel.

    at UCSD

  • Cue-Reward Learning and Weight Gain in Youth

    open to eligible people ages 8-11

    The objective of the study is to compare children at low risk for obesity (two healthy weight parents) to children at high risk for obesity (two overweight parents) in their response rate to food taste and in their rate of learning using fMRI.

    at UCSD

  • Dietary Treatment Study of Fat Synthesis and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

    open to eligible people ages 20-65

    The purpose of this study is to find out how the amount of fat or sugar in a person's diet, or the number of meals eaten each day, affect the amount of fat that people's bodies make, the types of fats in the bloodstream, and how much fat is stored in the liver. The study is funded by the National Institutes of Health.

    at UCSF

  • Effects of Phytonutrients on Vascular Health and Skin in Obese Males

    open to eligible males ages 18-65

    This study will determine the effects of beneficial compounds of plant foods, such as pomegranate on cardiovascular health, skin inflammation and aging. This will be tested by asking healthy males to eat a high fat ground beef patty with 8oz. pomegranate juice or 8oz placebo (a study product that looks like pomegranate juice, but contains no active ingredients) and then measuring blood vessel dilation (endothelial function) by blood flow. The investigators also will measure the amount of Nitric Oxide (NO) in blood and urine samples and sugar and insulin in blood. In addition, a Cutometer, a device that measures the elasticity of the skin, will be used to obtain measurements of skin inflammation and aging. Healthy men have been chosen for this study because eating high fat hamburger patties can easily mimic in them the condition that causes atherosclerosis. The results from this study may help to explain how high fat foods can be harmful to the body and how beneficial plant foods can have on cardiovascular function and the skin.

    at UCLA

  • Effects of Sleeve Gastrectomy on Calcium Metabolism and the Skeleton

    open to eligible people ages 25-70

    In this pre-post observational study, the investigators will enroll and follow a cohort of about 50 adults undergoing sleeve gastrectomy surgery for weight loss. Pre-operatively and at 6 and 12 months post-operatively, the investigators will use state-of-the-art metabolic and imaging techniques to evaluate calcium metabolism and skeletal health. Specific outcomes include intestinal calcium absorption capacity, bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and bone structure assessed by QCT and high-resolution peripheral QCT (HR-pQCT).

    at UCSF

  • Ethnic Influences on Stress, Energy Balance and Obesity in Adolescents

    open to eligible females ages 13-17

    The study will examine the mechanisms linking race, stress and biobehavioral factors to energy balance and obesity in both natural and controlled environments in African-American and Caucasian adolescent females.

    at UC Irvine

  • Financial Incentives for Weight Reduction Study

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    Financial incentives for motivating changes in health behavior, particularly for weight loss in obese individuals, are increasingly being tested by health insurers, employers, and government agencies. However, a key unanswered question regarding weight loss is how to structure these incentive programs to maximize their effectiveness, acceptability to patients, and economic sustainability. Focusing on obese patients living in neighborhoods with a high concentration of low socioeconomic status households, the investigators will compare the impact of financial incentives for weight loss on sustained weight loss, use of evidenced-based therapy, and quality of life, and they will determine their short-term and long-term return on investment.

    at UCLA

  • FRESH-DOSE: Families Responsibility Education Support Health—Dual Options for Sustained Effectiveness

    open to eligible people ages 7-12

    The objective of the study is to evaluate whether a less intensive intervention, Guided Self-Help Family Based Treatment (gshFBT), is non-inferior to the more intensive Family Based Treatment (FBT) for childhood obesity on child weight loss over 18-months. Cost-effectiveness of both treatments will also be compared.

    at UCSD

  • Guided Self-Help Obesity Treatment in the Doctor's Office - GOT Doc

    open to eligible people ages 5-13

    One-third of our nations' children are overweight or obese (OW/OB). The cornerstone of obesity treatment involves intensive family-based behavioral therapy, yet these programs often exist in tertiary care academic settings that have long wait lists and are too far away for families to access. Primary care providers (PCP) have been called on by several organizations to be the front line of obesity management, yet they are limited by a lack of time, resources, and skills. Thus, if we are to offer effective obesity management in the healthcare setting, other care models need to be developed and tested. The goal of this proposal is to deliver Guided Self-Help (GSH) treatment of childhood obesity in the primary care setting. This program relies on classic behavioral therapy strategies, self-regulation theory, and provides the support needed for patient/family self-management of weight loss. Implementing this program in the primary care setting will increase our ability to deliver nutrition and weight-related counseling in the primary care office and serve patients closer to home, thereby increasing access to effective treatment, improving adherence to recommended changes, and meeting the goals of Healthy People 2020.

    at UCSD

  • Inflammation, Diabetes, Ethnicity and Obesity Cohort

    open to eligible people ages 25-65

    Obesity affects over one third of US adults (>72 million, with BMI ≥30 kg/m2), and the proportion of US adults with BMI ≥40 kg/m2 has doubled in the last 20 years. Obesity is associated with increased mortality through its linkage to comorbidities including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea and psychosocial disturbances. Given its prevalence, impact on morbidity and mortality, and economic cost, limiting the spread of obesity and its consequences is one of the most important problems of our time.

    at UCSF

  • Influence of Freeze Dried Strawberry Consumption on Gut Microbiota and Cardiovascular Health.

    open to eligible people ages 40-65

    This proposal seeks to build upon studies, including ours, on the favorable effects of California strawberries on vascular health. Freeze dried strawberry powder (FDSP) contains a number of nutrients that may have beneficial effects on plasma lipids and vascular function, as well as on the composition of the gut microbiota; changes in the gut microbiota can in turn have secondary positive effects on the vascular system as well as on other physiological functions that are important determinants of health and disease. The proposed project will seek to determine the influence of short-term FDSP intake on the gut microbiota composition, and select microbial-derived metabolites from stool, serum and urine, and their relationship to microvascular function. Secondary outcomes will include the influence of the FDSP on circulating levels of nitrate and nitrite and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) as markers of vascular health that are influenced by both dietary intake and the oral and gut microflora, with blood pressure as an additional vascular outcome.

    at UC Davis

  • INtervention Study In overweiGHT Patients With COPD

    open to eligible people ages 40 years and up

    Symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and high body mass index (BMI) overlap. The investigators are trying to find out if a program proven to help people lose a modest amount of weight and increase their physical activity will improve COPD symptoms for those with a high BMI. The program uses a series of digital video discs (DVD) sessions focused on healthy eating and physical activity, and encourages participants to monitor their weight, diet, and physical activity for two years. For those who want to, they will be able to work with a health coach to help meet weight and activity goals. We hope that the program will lead to weight loss, better exercise tolerance, and less shortness of breath. To be in the study, participants will need to have COPD, high BMI, history of smoking, shortness of breath, and be at least 40 years old.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Koa Family: California's Obesity Prevention Project

    “This study hopes to learn if a new whole health program improves the health of low-income mothers.”

    open to eligible females ages 18-47

    The purpose of this study is to learn if a new whole-person lifestyle program improves the health of low-income mothers.

    at UC Davis

  • Metabolic Effects of Sugar and Aspartame

    “What are the effects of consuming sugar- and aspartame-sweetened beverages with standardized diets?”

    open to eligible people ages 18-40

    It is not known whether consumption of excessive amounts of sugar can increase risk factors for cardiovascular disease or diabetes in the absence of increased food (caloric) intake and weight gain, nor whether the negative effects of sugar consumption are made worse when accompanied by weight gain. This study will investigate the effects of excess sugar when consumed with an energy-balanced diet that prevents weight gain, and the effects of excess sugar when consumed with a diet that can cause weight gain. The results will determine whether excess sugar consumption and excess caloric intake that lead to weight gain have independent and additive effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease or diabetes, and will have the potential to influence dietary guidelines and public health policy.

    at UC Davis

  • MyLife: A Digital Health Coaching Program

    open to eligible people ages 18-64

    Lifestyle behaviors such as sleep, diet, and physical activity, are implicated in a number of chronic conditions including hypertension, obesity, diabetes, heart failure, and obstructive sleep apnea. Research shows that despite awareness of this fact, patients at risk for lifestyle-related chronic diseases have difficulty adhering to lifestyle change recommendations made by their physicians, and face challenges when attempting to modify unhealthy behaviors. New technologies, such as wearable activity trackers and automated text messaging, are promising tools for monitoring and promoting healthy lifestyle behaviors among patients. This randomized controlled trial will evaluate the effect of a digital health program, which uses pre-medical post-baccalaureate or undergraduate health coaches, wearable activity trackers (Fitbit Charge 2), and mobile messaging, compared to wearable activity trackers (Fitbit Charge 2) alone in promoting lifestyle change among overweight and sedentary 18-64 year old patients recruited from UCLA Health primary care clinics.

    at UCLA

  • Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry (POWER) Study

    open to eligible people ages up to 18 years

    The main objective of this study is to establish a national pediatric obesity registry known as POWER (Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry). This registry will contain clinical data from individual comprehensive pediatric weight management programs around the United States for overweight and obese youth.

    at UCSF UCLA

  • PRebiotic to IMprovE Calcium Absorption

    open to eligible females ages 18-75

    Gastric bypass surgery is a highly effective treatment for obesity, but it has negative effects on skeletal health, due in part to a dramatic decline in intestinal calcium absorption capacity. Animal and human studies suggest that non-digestible fibers termed prebiotics, such as soluble corn fiber (SCF), augment calcium absorption in the lower intestine as they act as substrates for beneficial gut microbiota. This is a pilot randomized controlled trial of the effects of SCF vs. placebo on intestinal calcium absorption, bone turnover marker levels, and the gut microbiome in postmenopausal women who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery.

    at UCSF

  • Reinforced Enhanced - Families Responsibility Education Support and Health

    open to eligible people ages 7-12

    The purpose of this application is to evaluate whether a pediatric weight control program that incorporates comprehensive parenting training with behavioral therapy can increase weight loss in children compared to traditional family-based behavioral therapy programs. Since certain parenting styles are associated with greater weight loss during interventions and appear to enhance the impact of key behavioral strategies, adding parenting training to these interventions may increase the overall effectiveness of these programs and increase our ability to help children obtain a healthy weight. This project could result in identifying an improved method of pediatric obesity treatment that provides additional benefits to the growth and development of children via improved self-regulatory behaviors.

    at UCSD

  • School Water Access, Food and Beverage Intake, and Obesity

    open to eligible people ages 9-12

    It is widely argued that the promotion of water consumption, as an alternative to sugar-sweetened beverages, can assist in childhood obesity prevention efforts. Yet no studies have tested this argument in real world schools where flavored milk or juices are available. This trial will fill gaps by examining how promoting fresh water intake-both in schools that do and do not provide access to caloric beverages -impacts children's consumption of food and beverages both during and outside of school, and obesity.

    at UCSF

  • Standard wound closure with/without incisional negative pressure wound therapy (INPWT) in high risk patients having panniculectomy

    “Is surgical wound healing complications, pain, and scarring improved with incisional negative pressure wound therapy (INPWT)?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Incisional negative pressure therapy (INPWT) has previously been shown in certain patient populations to decrease wound healing complications, decrease the rate of hematomas and seromas, as well as have better scar quality. We have found a group of patients, those who have panniculectomies in preparation for renal transplant, with significantly higher rates of wound healing complications. We believe the best way to demonstrate benefits of incisional negative pressure wound therapy will be in this group of patients known to have significantly higher rates of wound complications.

    at UC Davis

  • Strong Futures: A Trial of Two Primary Care Based Interventions to Promote Optimal Health in Latino Infants and Toddlers

    open to all eligible people

    Latino children experience higher rates of obesity compared to non-Hispanic white children, especially in low-income communities. Optimal feeding strategies in early life, avoidance of screen time and longer sleep duration may lower the risk of obesity. Family financial hardship is also associated with short- and long-term health risks, including behavioral and mental health problems, and toxic stress which contributes to elevated risk of common chronic conditions over the life course. This proposal aims to pilot test two interventions to promote optimal health outcomes in Latino infants. Study participants will meet with a health educator after well child visits at 2-weeks, 2-, 4-, 6-, 9- and 12-months. Half of the parents will receive education on obesity prevention. The other half will receive financial education and case management using an established financial coaching approach. Parents will also receive text messages that reinforce educational content. The objective of this study is to determine the acceptability and feasibility of offering these interventions in the well-child setting. Study investigators also seek to determine the preliminary efficacy of these interventions on infant and parent health outcomes including dietary intake, screen time, sleep duration, health related quality of life and financial stress.

    at UCSF

  • Study of Time-restricted Eating on Weight Loss.

    open to eligible people ages 18-64

    This is a randomized controlled trial studying the effects of time-restricted feeding (TRF) on weight loss in obese humans. Obesity is the number one risk factor for type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), and numerous studies demonstrate that weight loss is an effective strategy to prevent T2DM and improve the metabolic health of people diagnosed with T2DM. Unfortunately, classical calorie restriction diets often fail to produce long-term weight loss due to low compliance, reduced resting metabolic rate (RMR), and other factors. Therefore, novel dieting techniques must be explored in order to successfully treat obesity and prevent T2DM. Studies in mice provide compelling evidence that feeding/fasting cycles can be altered to produce beneficial effects on weight loss and metabolic health markers in the absence of calorie restriction. Limited research in human subjects suggests that this feeding paradigm may translate to human health as well, however, more research needs to be done in order to confirm this hypothesis. This study will determine if TRE can lead to weight loss in obese human subjects. Secondary outcomes include changes in body composition, HOMA-IR, hormonal and biochemical serum markers, RMR, and total energy expenditure (TEE).

    at UCSF

  • Studying Metabolic Responses to Bariatric Surgery

    “Using tissue samples to better understand the metabolism and genetics of obesity”

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Research the genetic and biomechanical markers of human adipose tissue on patients with morbid obesity. Additional tissue/fluid collection is also gathered during the time of surgery.

    at UC Davis

  • Studying the Safety and Effectiveness of Experimental Sugammadex Given According to Ideal vs. Actual Body Weight in Obese Patients

    “This study is for morbidly obese patients scheduled to have surgery that will require a neuromuscular blocking agent.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this trial is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Sugammadex when administered according to actual body weight (ABW) as compared to ideal body weight (IBW) for the reversal of both moderate and deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) induced by either Rocuronium or Vecuronium in morbidly obese participants. The primary hypothesis of this investigation is that, compared to obese participants dosed based on IBW, obese participants receiving Sugammadex according to ABW will demonstrate a faster time to recovery to a Train Of Four (TOF) ratio of ≥0.9 (i.e. faster NMB reversal), pooled across NMB depth and type of neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA; Rocuronium or Vecuronium) administered.

    at UC Davis

  • Transvaginal NOTES Sleeve Gastrectomy

    open to eligible females ages 18-75

    This is a prospective chart review/data collection study of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) for sleeve gastrectomy, that will include questionnaires administered throughout the study. Subjects enrolled will be those intending to have a transvaginal NOTES sleeve gastrectomy. Data will be collected and reviewed through 12 months post-op.

    at UCSD

  • UCSD Get Fit, Be Fit Study

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    The purpose of the Get Fit, Be Fit Study is to examine the effect of incorporating pistachios in an intensive 4-month cognitive-behavioral weight loss intervention in overweight and obese men and women, to examine effects on metabolic factors, and to monitor and examine changes in dietary intake and food choices during the intervention, in a randomized controlled study.

    at UCSD

  • Ultrasound Assessment of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Who Changed Diet

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate if a weight loss intervention will improve your rheumatoid arthritis disease activity.

    at UCLA

  • Walnuts to Achieve Lasting NUTrition to Prevent Diabetes

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Prediabetes is a precursor of type 2 diabetes and an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and currently affects one-quarter of the population of the United States. Individuals of overweight or obese BMI are at particular high risk for incident diabetes. A major modifiable risk factor for type 2 diabetes is poor dietary quality, and improvement of dietary quality can effectively delay and even prevent type 2 diabetes. Interventions to improve dietary quality thus far, however, rely on short-term intensive clinically designed meals replacing the entire diet which have poor sustainability. Persistent improvements to daily dietary patterns are often difficult without directed guidance, and overall dietary quality in the United States remains poor. The identification of a practical, daily dietary intervention to improve dietary quality and prevent diabetes in those at high risk remains unknown. The investigators propose to enroll 40 individuals with diagnosed prediabetes into a randomized controlled pilot study and provide a daily walnut supplementation intervention to determine feasibility and acceptability of the supplement. The investigators will then determine preliminary efficacy on metabolic markers and will investigate associations between dietary quality and circulating levels of branched-chain amino acids. The goal is to implement a whole-food supplement to improve dietary quality in patients with prediabetes as a tool for future type 2 diabetes prevention.

    at UCSF

  • An Addiction-Based Mobile Health Weight Loss Intervention With Coaching

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    New and creative approaches are needed to address childhood obesity. Current strategies result in suboptimal outcomes and are intensive and costly. It has been theorized that overeating, may have addictive qualities, although few weight management interventions have tested therapeutic techniques founded on addiction medicine principles, such as, withdrawal, tolerance and craving control1, 2. A pilot study utilizing an addiction model based mobile health (mHealth) weight-loss intervention in adolescents showed that the app intervention reduced BMI Z-score (zBMI) to a greater extent than youth participating in an in-clinic multidisciplinary weight management intervention, and appeared to be a cost-effective, labor efficient method for adolescent weight management. The proposed multi-site randomized control trial (RCT) will test the effectiveness of an addiction-based weight loss intervention, embodied first as a smartphone app with telephone coaching and second as an identical approach phone-coaching alone intervention compared to age matched controls participating in an in-clinic weight management interventions in a larger sample of economically, racially and ethnically diverse adolescents (ages 14-18). One hundred and eighty adolescents will be recruited from pediatric interdisciplinary weight management clinics operating out of five different hospital systems in Southern California and through targeted mailing to 40 ethnically, racially and economically diverse neighborhoods in Los Angeles County. The adolescents will be randomized 1:1 via stratified block randomization to either receive 1) interactive addiction model based mobile health (mHealth) weight-loss intervention with personalized phone-coaching (AppCoach), 2) interactive addiction model based mHealth weight-loss intervention alone (App) or 3) Multidisciplinary in-clinic weight management program (Clinic). Assessment of the intervention's effect on zBMI and percent over the 95th percentile (%BMIp95), fasting metabolic parameters, addictive eating habits, executive function, and motivation for change will be obtained at enrollment, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months (1 year post intervention follow up). In addition, a real-life economic analysis (cost, cost-saving and non-monetary benefits) analysis will be completed comparing AppCoach to 1) App and 2) Clinic. We will further explore whether primary and secondary outcomes differ by race and whether race moderates the relationship between initial intervention efficacy and prolonged weight maintenance.

    at UCLA

  • CHARGE: Controlling Hunger and ReGulating Eating

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The objectives of this proposed study are: 1) to evaluate feasibility and acceptability of a novel intervention, Regulation of Cues (ROC), and Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), and 2) to evaluate the efficacy of both treatments on reduction of binge eating and weight loss among 120 Veterans with subclinical or clinical Binge Eating Disorder (BED) with comorbid overweight/obesity (OW/OB).

    at UCSD

  • Extracellular microRNA: Biomarkers of Endothelial Dysfunction in Obese Adolescents & Adults With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Using a prospective observational approach and a clinical trial design comparing the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure to diet and exercise, investigators plan to evaluate how obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) leads to endothelial dysfunction in adolescents and young adults and whether treatment of OSA can improve endothelial dysfunction. Concurrently, investigators will measure miR 92a/miR 210 levels in all subjects at baseline and following therapy to determine whether miR 92a/miR 210 levels reliably predict endothelial dysfunction in patients and responses to therapy.

    at UCSD

  • Feeding My Baby - A National WIC Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The goal of the study is to be a current examination of infant and toddler feeding practices among families receiving WIC services. It has been more than 10 years since the last study of such feeding practices, and in the interim important changes have taken place in the WIC program, in society, and in the science of nutrition. The study will include exploration of breastfeeding practices and support, more general feeding practices, nutritional intake of infants and toddlers, transitions in infant and toddler feeding practices, early precursors of obesity, and family factors that may influence all of these nutrition-related issues. It will also explore characteristics of the WIC program in selected sites, and how these relate to infant and toddler feeding decisions and practices. This study is important both to update knowledge about the WIC population, and to uncover possible new avenues of inquiry regarding early childhood obesity.

    at UCLA

  • FRESH-TEEN: Families Responsibility Education Support Health for Teens

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The objective of this proposed study is to collect initial efficacy data on a behavioral weight loss (BWL) program for teens, which also includes emotion regulation strategies (ER), to standard BWL.

    at UCSD

  • GERD Following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) creates a vertical gastrectomy which results in a narrow and tubular shape of stomach. The line of resection starts at 3-6 cm. from pylorus (antrum) toward to the angle of His. The gastric antrum plays a major role in gastric emptying, particularly for solids. Hence, depending upon the starting point of gastric sleeve resection in each center, this can result in difference of the remaining gastric antrum which may affect gastric emptying time after this procedure.

    at UCSF

  • HDL Lipidomic, Proteomic and Functional Changes in Women After Eating Eggs

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The objective of this randomized, single blinded cross-over study is to investigate effects of daily egg versus yolk-free egg substitute consumption on High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) composition and function in a population of overweight and obese postmenopausal women.

    at UC Davis

  • Improving Reproductive Fitness Through Pretreatment With Lifestyle Modification in Obese Women With Unexplained Infertility

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    A two-arm, multicenter, prospective, randomized clinical trial of a lifestyle modification program with tracked increased physical activity and weight loss (intensive) compared to recommendations to tracking of increased physical activity alone with weight maintenance (standard) in women with obesity and unexplained infertility. This 16 week period of lifestyle modification will be followed by an open label empiric infertility treatment regimen consisting of three cycles of ovarian stimulation with oral medication (clomiphene citrate (CC)), triggering of ovulation with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and intrauterine insemination (IUI).

    at UCSF

  • Metabolomic Profiling in Adolescents With Obesity and Diabetes

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to identify unique metabolite signatures associated with the development of Type 2 diabetes and diabetic kidney disease in children. We have a sub-study, with the purpose to validate the presence of a genetic marker (DENND1A) in the urine of adolescent females with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    at UCSD

  • Modeling the Neurological Basis and Characterizing the Neurological Phenotype of Obesity Using Human Neural Stem Cells

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study aims to characterize the neurological basis of obesity and response to surgical and medical treatment by inducing adult pluripotent stem cells into neuronal cells from subjects that have demonstrated extreme response to bariatric surgery or pharmacological treatment for obesity.

    at UCSD

  • Multi-component Intervention for Diabetes in Adults With Serious Mental Illness

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Persons with schizophrenia and other serious mental illnesses have a high risk for type 2 diabetes and an increased risk of premature mortality compared to the general population. The goals of the proposed study are to implement a multimodal lifestyle intervention to reduce that risk in these individuals living in residential care facilities, a common housing modality for people with serious mental illnesses. If successful, this intervention will lead to reduction in excess medical comorbidity and mortality in persons with serious mental illnesses.

    at UCSD

  • Novel Executive Function Training for Obesity

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Currently, the best behavioral treatments for obesity only work for 50% of adults, and of those who initially succeed, most do not maintain their weight loss. One reason for this failure may be due to neurocognitive deficits found among individuals with obesity, particularly related to executive function, which make it difficult for these adults to adhere to treatment recommendations. The proposed study aims to develop a Novel Executive Function Treatment (NEXT), which when administered prior to the behavioral treatment, could help improve outcomes by addressing the neurocognitive deficits in adults with overweight or obesity.

    at UCSD

  • PACIFIC: Providing Adults Collaborative Interventions For Ideal Changes

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The objective of this proposed study is to collect initial efficacy data on ROC and ROC + BWL compared to an active comparator (AC) and to BWL.

    at UCSD

  • PASOS: Improving the Health of Immigrant Workers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a cluster randomized trial (CRT) to assess the effectiveness of a culturally appropriate behavioral intervention to reduce obesity levels and ultimately the risk of developing diabetes type II in immigrant Latino farm workers. Randomization is at the farm ranch level. Individuals at intervention ranches will receive a multi-week curriculum at the work-site on diabetes, diet and physical activity and optional supplemental sessions in the evening and weekends. The investigators will adopt the intent-to-treat principle for the primary analysis. Individuals on control ranches will receive no health educational instruction. The primary outcome is BMI. The investigators hypothesize that intervention ranches will achieve significant improvement in obesity and diabetes risk factors as compared to control ranches.

    at UC Davis

  • Pelvic Radiation Therapy or Vaginal Implant Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Stage I or Stage II Endometrial Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies pelvic radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with vaginal implant radiation therapy, paclitaxel, and carboplatin in treating patients with high-risk stage I or stage II endometrial cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Implant radiation therapy uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether pelvic radiation therapy alone is more effective than vaginal implant radiation therapy, paclitaxel, and carboplatin in treating patients with endometrial cancer.

    at UCLA UC Irvine UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Pivotal Aspiration Therapy With Adjusted Lifestyle Therapy Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research study is being performed to find out if a new device, AspireAssist Aspiration Therapy System, can help people with obesity to lose weight without causing too many side effects.

    at UCSD

  • Study of the Relationship Between Body Composition, Insulin Resistance and HDL Levels

    “HDL Study”

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Approximately 20 million people in the United States have some form of kidney failure. People with kidney failure have an increased chance of having low levels of high density lipid (HDL), so called "good cholesterol." Patients who are overweight or obese also have low levels of HDL. The investigators are trying to find out whether causes of low HDL are the same in people who are overweight and in patients with kidney failure so that in the future doctors can better treat low HDL cholesterol levels. People with low levels of HDL are more likely to have heart attacks and strokes and are more likely to lose kidney function. This study hope to learn more about how kidney failure causes low HDL cholesterol levels.

    at UC Davis

  • The Effect of a Healthy Snack on Body Weight and Composition

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The results from this study may help to explain if incorporating mixed nuts in a reduced calorie diet will lead to weight loss.

    at UCLA

  • The Effects of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Increased Weight on Gut Microbiome and Urine Metabolome Profiles in Children

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study employs a cross-sectional design to profile the gut microbiome and urine metabolome in overweight/obese children with type 1 diabetes (T1D).

    at UCSD

  • The Impact of Time Restricted Feeding (TRF) in Improving the Health of Patients With Metabolic Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators intend to measure the health impact of a dietary intervention known as time restricted feeding (TRF) on patients with metabolic syndrome (three or more of: increased waist circumference, abnormal cholesterol levels, elevated blood pressure, or elevated blood sugar). The investigators will enroll patients with metabolic syndrome who eat for ≥ 14 hours per day and will ask participants to reduce daily oral intake to 10 hours per day. The investigators will assess the impact of this dietary change using measures obtained before and after a 12 week intervention period, including body mass index, blood pressure, various lab parameters and blood sugar levels (assessed using a continuous glucose monitor). The investigators will assess for compliance with TRF using a Smart Phone application (myCircadianClock (mCC) app).

    at UCSD

  • The Use of Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy to Characterize in Response to Weight-Loss Intervention

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The first step in any clinical intervention against obesity involves sustained lifestyle changes. Researcher can use these strategies to beneficial the effects of weight and on cardiovascular risk. The researcher develope methods for assessing the effectiveness use optical technology to make such assessments, specifically in the area of fatty tissue can predict the effectiveness of the intervention in causing weight reduction and treating metabolic disease.

    at UC Irvine

  • Unidas Por la Vida: A Healthy Lifestyle Intervention for High-risk Latina Dyads

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Mexican American women have significantly elevated rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes. The proposed study tests a novel intervention that capitalizes on an existing important family dyad (mothers and their adult daughters) to foster clinically significant and long-lasting health behavior change. If found to effective, this intervention strategy has great potential to address health disparities in this, and other, at-risk populations.

    at UC Irvine UCSD

  • Vestibular Stimulation to Trigger Adipose Loss (VeSTAL) Clinical Trial

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    A randomized, double blind sham controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of vestibular nerve stimulation (VeNS), combined with a lifestyle modification program, compared to a sham control and a lifestyle modification program as a means of reducing excess body weight and body fat. The purpose of this investigation device study is to collect data to support regulatory submissions, primarily in the United States of America (USA), but it may also be used to support submissions in other regions, including the European Union (EU).

    at UCSD

  • Vestibular Stimulation to Trigger Adipose Loss Clinical Trial

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    There is an ongoing and worsening problem with obesity in the developed, and much of the developing world. Although it has long been realized that Western diets that are rich in sugar and fat play an important role in this, it has only recently been realized that exposure to these diets, particularly in childhood, can damage the part of the brain that determines how much fat there is in the body. The result of this damage is that the so-called "set-point" for fat in this part of the brain is pushed upwards. There is a lot of evidence from animals that activating the brain's balance (vestibular) system pushes this set-point for fat downwards to cause fat loss, probably because this tricks the brain into thinking that the animal is more physically active. The aim of this study is to see whether the same effect can be triggered in humans by non-invasively stimulating the vestibular system with a small electrical current through the skin behind their ears.

    at UCSD

  • Weight Management in Mothers and Adult Daughters

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The purpose of this study is to develop, implement, and evaluate a behavioral weight management intervention with a communication training component for Mexican-American women. The study has three specific aims. Aim 1: Develop a behavioral weight loss intervention that modifies evidence-based behavioral weight loss treatment using results from formative data collected from Mexican-American mother-daughter dyads. The adapted intervention will focus on improving dyadic communication and collaboration for providing reciprocal support for healthy eating and physical activity behaviors. Aim 2: Implement and evaluate a pilot weight management program adapted for mother-daughter dyads. Dyads will be randomly assigned to partner-based treatment with or without communication skills training. Aim 3: Evaluate associations between changes in weight, weight-related behaviors, and psychosocial variables with changes in measures assessing interpersonal communication.

    at UCSD

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