Summary

Eligibility
for people ages 18 years and up (full criteria)
Healthy Volunteers
healthy people welcome
Location
at UCLA UCSF
Dates
study started
estimated completion
Principal Investigator
by A. Janet Tomiyama (ucla)

Description

Summary

The study will use a between-subjects design in a sample of individuals with BMI greater than or equal to 28 from the Los Angeles community (N=330). Participants will be randomly assigned to a weight stigma vs. control manipulation. Changes to the following health behaviors will be subsequently measured in their everyday lives: 3-day diet as captured by ecological momentary assessment (EMA) food diaries, objectively measured eating of obesogenic foods, objectively measured physical activity captured by 24-hour actigraphy, and sleep, captured objectively by overnight actigraphy and subjectively self-reported sleep measures. The investigators hypothesize that weight stigma causes decrements in health behaviors (e.g., sleep, eating, and physical activity) in everyday life.

Official Title

Obesity Stigma and Health Behavior: An Experimental Approach

Keywords

Obesity Weight Prejudice Sleep Eating Exercise Ecological Momentary Assessment Actigraphy Diet Records Weight stigma intervention

Eligibility

You can join if…

Open to people ages 18 years and up

  1. Age 18+
  2. English-speaking
  3. BMI greater than or equal to 28

You CAN'T join if...

  1. Major mental disorder including eating disorder, mood disorder, schizophrenia, PTSD
  2. Recent (<1 year) diagnosis of major physical conditions that limit physical movement
  3. Recent (<1 year) diagnosis of sleep disorder
  4. Allergy to any of the foods in the food buffet

Location

  • University of California, Los Angeles accepting new patients
    Los Angeles California 90095 United States

Lead Scientist at University of California Health

Details

Status
accepting new patients
Start Date
Completion Date
(estimated)
Sponsor
University of California, Los Angeles
ID
NCT05402137
Study Type
Interventional
Participants
Expecting 330 study participants
Last Updated