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Acute Pain clinical trials at UC Health

2 in progress, 1 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Experimental Magnesium Infusion for Pain Management in Critically Ill Trauma Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Magnesium is a naturally occurring mineral that is important for your body and brain. Magnesium sulfate (study drug) is a medication containing magnesium that is commonly used to improve low blood levels of magnesium. Magnesium sulfate has also proven to be successful in managing pain before and after surgery. However, this drug has primarily been used for pain control in patients undergoing surgery. Patients in the ICU with injuries also need good pain control. Using magnesium may assist in decreasing narcotic (pain reliever) requirements and provide another non-narcotic drug for pain control. The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of continuous, intravenous (into or within a vein using a needle) administration of magnesium sulfate for pain control in trauma patients admitted to the adult Intensive Care Unit. This will be compared to intravenous normal saline (salt solution).

    at UC Davis

  • Optimal Management of Pain in Hospitalized Patients - Opioid Tolerant Populations.

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Pain is a symptom that drives hospital admissions, and pain management is required by most patients during their hospital stay. Further, the use of medications such as opioids can lead to upward-spiraling doses, especially among chronic pain patients whose resource utilization rates are high. Many initiatives aim to reduce the costs of these "high-resource utilizing" patients. One exciting aspect of improving the management of pain is that this may help prevent patients from ever becoming high-cost in the first place. The purpose of this study is to examine the impacts of an early and sustained intervention pathway, in comparison to the current standard of care, for the treatment of pain in opioid tolerant patients. It is hypothesized that patients randomized to the intervention pathway, in comparison to the control, will lead to decreased costs of care, a reduction in opioid usage within 3 and 6 months, and decrease in hospital readmission rates.

    at UC Irvine

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