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Anemia clinical trials at University of California Health

52 in progress, 23 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Gene Transfer Study Inducing Fetal Hemoglobin in Sickle Cell Disease (GRASP, BMT CTN 2001)

    open to eligible people ages 13-40

    A promising approach for the treatment of genetic diseases is called gene therapy. Gene therapy is a relatively new field of medicine in which genetic material (mostly DNA) in the patient is changed to treat his or her own disease. In gene therapy, we introduce new genetic material in order to fix or replace the patient's disease gene, with the goal of curing the disease. The procedure is similar to a bone marrow transplant, in that the patient's malfunctioning blood stem cells are reduced or eliminated using chemotherapy, but it is different because instead of using a different person's (donor) blood stem cells for the transplant, the patient's own blood stem cells are given back after the new genetic material has been introduced into those cells. This approach has the advantage of eliminating any risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD), reducing the risk of graft rejection, and may also allow less chemotherapy to be utilized for the conditioning portion of the transplant procedure. To introduce new genetic material into the patient's own blood stem cells we use a modified version of a virus (called a 'vector') that efficiently inserts the "correcting" genetic material into the cells. The vector is a specialized biological medicine that has been formulated for use in human beings. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is a healthy, non-sickling kind of hemoglobin. The investigators have discovered a gene that is very important in controlling the amount of HbF. Decreasing the expression of this gene in sickle cell patients could increase the amount of fetal hemoglobin while simultaneously reducing the amount of sickle hemoglobin in their blood, specifically the amount in red blood cells where sickle hemoglobin causes damage to the cell, and therefore potentially cure or significantly improve the condition. The gene we are targeting for change in this study that controls the level of fetal hemoglobin is called BCL11A. In summary, the advantages of a gene therapy approach include: 1) it can be used even if the patient does not have a matched donor available; 2) it may allow a reduction in the amount of chemotherapy required to prepare the patient for the transplant; and 3) it will avoid certain strong medicines often required to prevent and treat GVHD and rejection. Our lab studies with normal mice, mice that have a form of SCD, and with cells from the bone marrow of SCD patients who have donated bone marrow for research purposes show this approach is very effective in reducing the amount of sickle hemoglobin in red cells. Our pilot trial testing this approach in 10 patients with SCD has shown that the treatment has not caused any unexpected safety problems, and that it increases HbF within the red blood cells. Our goal is to continue to test whether this approach is safe, and whether using gene therapy to change the expression of BCL11A will lead to decreased episodes of vaso-occlusive crisis pain in people with SCD.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Mitapivat (AG-348) in Participants With Sickle Cell Disease (RISE UP)

    open to eligible people ages 16 years and up

    This clinical trial is a Phase 2/3 study that will determine the recommended dose of mitapivat and evaluate the efficacy and safety of mitapivat in sickle cell disease by testing how well mitapivat works compared to placebo to increase the amount of hemoglobin in the blood and to reduce or prevent the occurrence of sickle cell pain crises. In addition, the long-term effect of mitapivat on efficacy and safety will be explored in an open-label extension portion.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Pharmacodynamics of Crovalimab as Adjunct Treatment in Prevention of Vaso-Occlusive Episodes (VOE) in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)

    open to eligible people ages 12-55

    This study is designed to evaluate the efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of crovalimab compared with placebo as adjunct therapy in the prevention of VOEs in participants with SCD.

    at UCSF

  • EDIT-301 in Participants With Severe Sickle Cell Disease (RUBY)

    open to eligible people ages 12-50

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of treatment with EDIT-301 in adult and adolescent participants with severe sickle cell disease (SCD).

    at UCSF

  • Etavopivat in Patients With Thalassemia or Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 12-65

    This clinical trial is a Phase 2 study that will evaluate the safety and clinical activity of etavopivat in patients with thalassemia or sickle cell disease and test how well etavopivat works to lower the number of red blood cell transfusions required and increase hemoglobin.

    at UC Irvine UCLA UCSF

  • Obexelimab in Patients With Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (SApHiAre)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study aims to examine the efficacy and safety of obexelimab in participants with Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (wAIHA).

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Long-term Safety of Inclacumab Administered to Participants With Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This study is an open-label study to evaluate the safety of long-term administration of inclacumab in participants with sickle cell disease (SCD). Participants in this study will have completed a prior study of inclacumab.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • Oral GSK4172239D Compared With Placebo in Sickle Cell Disease Participants Aged 18 to 50 Years

    open to eligible people ages 18-50

    This will be a first time in human (FTIH) study in sickle cell diseases (SCD) participants. The FTIH study is planned to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of GSK4172239D. The study will be composed of 3 periods for all participants (Screening, Treatment, and Follow up). Participants will be screened and, prior to first dose on Day 1, will be randomized to receive either GSK4172239D or placebo. GSK4172239D is a prodrug that is converted in vivo into GSK4106401. This study will be a single dose, dose-escalation study. The initial dosing for all cohorts will be staggered so that 2 participants will be dosed as sentinel participants. Provided there are no safety concerns in 48 hours (h), the remaining 6 participants scheduled for the cohort may be dosed. One selected cohort of participants will also receive an additional single dose of GSK4172239D (or matching placebo) under fed (high calorie and high fat) conditions after a washout period of a minimum of 20 days or 5 half-lives, whichever is longer, designated as the Food Effect Cohort.

    at UCLA

  • Comparing Unrelated Donor BMT With IST for Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Severe Aplastic Anemia (TransIT, BMT CTN 2202)

    open to eligible people ages 0-25

    Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA) is a rare condition in which the body stops producing enough new blood cells. SAA can be cured with immune suppressive therapy or a bone marrow transplant. Regular treatment for patients with aplastic anemia who have a matched sibling (brother or sister), or family donor is a bone marrow transplant. Patients without a matched family donor normally are treated with immune suppressive therapy (IST). Match unrelated donor (URD) bone marrow transplant (BMT) is used as a secondary treatment in patients who did not get better with IST, had their disease come back, or a new worse disease replaced it (like leukemia). This trial will compare time from randomization to failure of treatment or death from any cause of IST versus URD BMT when used as initial therapy to treat SAA. The trial will also assess whether health-related quality of life and early markers of fertility differ between those randomized to URD BMT or IST, as well as assess the presence of marrow failure-related genes and presence of gene mutations associated with MDS or leukemia and the change in gene signatures after treatment in both study arms. This study treatment does not include any investigational drugs. The medicines and procedures in this study are standard for treatment of SAA.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Luspatercept (ACE-536) Versus Placebo in Subjects With Myeloproliferative Neoplasm-Associated Myelofibrosis on Concomitant JAK2 Inhibitor Therapy and Who Require Red Blood Cell Transfusions

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this Phase 3 study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Luspatercept compared with placebo in subjects with myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN)-associated Myelofibrosis (MF) and anemia on concomitant Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) inhibitor therapy and who require red blood cell count (RBC) transfusions. The study is divided into Screening Period, a Treatment Phase (consisting of a Blinded Core Treatment Period, a Day 169 Response Assessment, a Blinded Extension Treatment Period, and an Open-label Extension Treatment Period), and a Posttreatment Follow-up Period. Following the Day 169 Response Assessment, subjects who did not show clinical benefit will have the option to unblind. Subjects who were on placebo during the Blinded Core Treatment Period will have the opportunity to crossover into the Open-Label Extension Treatment Period and receive Luspatercept.

    at UCLA

  • Etavopivat in Adults and Adolescents With Sickle Cell Disease (HIBISCUS)

    “We are looking for people age 12 to 65 years old with SCD to help test a drug trying to reduce the number of vaso-occlusive crises”

    open to eligible people ages 12-65

    This clinical trial is a Phase 2/3 study that will evaluate the efficacy and safety of etavopivat and test how well etavopivat works compared to placebo to improve the amount of hemoglobin in the blood and to reduce the number of vaso-occlusive crises (times when the blood vessels become blocked and cause pain).

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSF

  • Pazopanib on Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Related Epistaxis and Anemia (Paz)

    open to eligible people ages 18-85

    During the Efficacy Study (Part B), the investigators will study whether Pazopanib, taken daily for 24 weeks, will reduce the severity of nose bleeds in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Patients will either be provided active drug or a placebo [sugar - inactive pill], and be tested for nose bleed severity throughout the trial, including particularly nose bleed duration. Investigators will also test for blood loss, as well as for safety. This study is funded by the US Department of Defense USAMRAA and FDA/OOPD.

    at UCLA

  • Exercise in Child Health

    open to eligible people ages 10-17

    This study is a cooperative investigation funded by the NIH. The project is a collaboration among three major NIH Clinical Translational Science Awardees: 1) UCI (lead site with its affiliate CHOC), 2) Northwestern University (with its affiliate Lurie Children's Hospital), and 3) USC (with its affiliate Children's Hospital of Los Angeles). There is an increasing number of children who, through medical advances, now survive diseases and conditions that were once fatal, but which remain chronic and debilitating. A major challenge to improve both the immediate and long term care and health of such children has been the gap in our understanding of how to assess the biological effects of exercise. Like otherwise healthy children, children with chronic diseases and disabilities want to be physically active. The challenge is to determine what constitutes safe and beneficial level of physical activity when the underlying disease or condition [e.g., cystic fibrosis (CF) or sickle cell disease (SCD)] imposes physiological constraints on exercise that are not present in otherwise healthy children. Current exercise testing protocols were based on studies of athletes and high performing healthy individuals and were designed to test limits of performance at very high-intensity, unphysiological, maximal effort. These approaches are not optimal for children and adolescents with disease and disability. This project (REACH-Revamping Exercise Assessment in Child Health) is designed to address this gap. Cohorts of children will be identified with two major genetic diseases (CF and SCD) and measure exercise responses annually as they progress from early puberty to mid or late puberty over a 3-4year period. In addition, in the light of the pandemic, a group of children will be added who were affected by SARS-CoV-2 and investigate their responses to exercise. SARS-CoV-2 has similar long-term symptoms than CF and SCD have. Novel approaches to assessing physiological responses to exercise using advanced data analytics will be examined in relation to metrics of habitual physical activity, circulating biomarkers of inflammation and growth, leukocyte gene expression, and the impact of the underlying CF, SCD or SARS-CoV-2 condition. The data from this study will help to develop a toolkit of innovative metrics for exercise testing that will be made available to the research and clinical community.

    at UC Irvine

  • Myeloablative Conditioning, Prophylactic Defibrotide and Haplo AlloSCT for Patients With Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 6 months to 34 years

    This is a follow-up trial to NYMC 526 (NCT01461837) to assess the safety, efficacy and toxicity of administering Defibrotide prophylaxis for high-risk sickle cell or beta thalassemia patients undergoing a familial haploidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantation with CD34 enrichment and T-cell addback. This patient population historically has a risk of developing sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) and Defibrotide has demonstrated efficacy in treatment of SOS. The Funding Source is FDA OOPD.

    at UCLA

  • Research Study Investigating How Well NDec Works in People With Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study examines how well a new, potential medicine called NDec works and is tolerated in people with sickle cell disease. NDec is a combination of two medicines (decitabine-tetrahydrouridine). Both medicines are new for the treatment of sickle cell disease. Participants who are not taking Hydroxyurea (HU) will get NDec, NDec and placebo, or placebo. Participants who are on HU treatment before joining the study will get NDec, NDec and placebo, or continue on HU. Which treatment participants get is decided by chance. Participants getting NDec and/or Placebo will get capsules to take twice weekly. The study will last for about a year.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Sickle Cell Disease and CardiovAscular Risk - Red Cell Exchange Trial (SCD-CARRE)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The SCD-CARRE trial is a Phase 3, prospective, randomized, multicenter, controlled, parallel two-arm study aimed to determine if automated exchange blood transfusion and standard of care administered to high mortality risk adult SCD patients reduces the total number of episodes of clinical worsening of SCD requiring acute health care encounters (non-elective infusion center/ER/hospital visits) or resulting in death over 12 months as compared with standard of care.

    at UCSF

  • Sickle Cell Disease Treatment With Arginine Therapy (STArT) Trial

    open to eligible people ages 3-21

    The trial of IV arginine therapy in children with Vaso-occlusive painful episodes (VOE) in sickle cell disease (SCD) is designed to further knowledge on efficacy and safety of the therapy.

    at UCSF

  • Treosulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen Before a Blood or Bone Marrow Transplant for the Treatment of Bone Marrow Failure Diseases (BMT CTN 1904)

    open to eligible people ages 1-49

    This phase II trial tests whether treosulfan, fludarabine, and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) work when given before a blood or bone marrow transplant (conditioning regimen) to cause fewer complications for patients with bone marrow failure diseases. Chemotherapy drugs, such as treosulfan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Fludarabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. rATG is used to decrease the body's immune response and may improve bone marrow function and increase blood cell counts. Adding treosulfan to a conditioning regimen with fludarabine and rATG may result in patients having less severe complications after a blood or bone marrow transplant.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Venetoclax in Combination With ASTX727 for the Treatment of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia and Other Myelodysplastic Syndrome/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial tests whether decitabine and cedazuridine (ASTX727) in combination with venetoclax work better than ASTX727 alone at decreasing symptoms of bone marrow cancer in patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN) with excess blasts. Blasts are immature blood cells. Decitabine is in a class of medications called hypomethylation agents. It works by helping the bone marrow produce normal blood cells and by killing abnormal cells in the bone marrow. Cobimetinib is used in patients whose cancer has a mutated (changed) form of a gene called BRAF. It is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of an abnormal protein that signals cancer cells to multiply. This helps slow or stop the spread of cancer cells. Venetoclax is in a class of medications called B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) inhibitors. It may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking Bcl-2, a protein needed for cancer cell survival. The combination of ASTX727 and venetoclax may be more effective in reducing the cancer signs and symptoms in patients with CMML, or MDS/MPN with excess blasts.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Access and Distribution Protocol for Unlicensed Cryopreserved Cord Blood Units (CBUs)

    “Assessing new blood cells growth after transplant using cord blood units that do not meet FDA guidelines but meet NMDP guidelines”

    open to all eligible people

    This study is an access and distribution protocol for unlicensed cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) in pediatric and adult patients with hematologic malignancies and other indications.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • ATHN Transcends: A Natural History Study of Non-Neoplastic Hematologic Disorders

    open to all eligible people

    In parallel with the growth of American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network's (ATHN) clinical studies, the number of new therapies for all congenital and acquired hematologic conditions, not just those for bleeding and clotting disorders, is increasing significantly. Some of the recently FDA-approved therapies for congenital and acquired hematologic conditions have yet to demonstrate long-term safety and effectiveness beyond the pivotal trials that led to their approval. In addition, results from well-controlled, pivotal studies often cannot be replicated once a therapy has been approved for general use.(1,2,3,4) In 2019 alone, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued approvals for twenty-four new therapies for congenital and acquired hematologic conditions.(5) In addition, almost 10,000 new studies for hematologic diseases are currently registered on www.clinicaltrials.gov.(6) With this increase in potential new therapies on the horizon, it is imperative that clinicians and clinical researchers in the field of non-neoplastic hematology have a uniform, secure, unbiased, and enduring method to collect long-term safety and efficacy data. ATHN Transcends is a cohort study to determine the safety, effectiveness, and practice of therapies used in the treatment of participants with congenital or acquired non-neoplastic blood disorders and connective tissue disorders with bleeding tendency. The study consists of 7 cohorts with additional study "arms" and "modules" branching off from the cohorts. The overarching objective of this longitudinal, observational study is to characterize the safety, effectiveness and practice of treatments for all people with congenital and acquired hematologic disorders in the US. As emphasized in a recently published review, accurate, uniform and quality national data collection is critical in clinical research, particularly for longitudinal cohort studies covering a lifetime of biologic risk.(7)

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSD

  • Oxbryta® Product Registry An Observational Study Designed to Evaluate the Effect of Oxbryta in Individuals With SCD

    open to eligible people ages 4 years and up

    This registry is an observational study designed to evaluate the effect of Oxbryta in individuals with SCD in a real-world setting.

    at UCSD

  • Recruitment and Engagement in Care to Impact Practice Enhancement (RECIPE) for Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this observational study is to help us understand more about the best ways to help individuals living with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) get the best care. The main question it aims to answer is: How to find individuals unaffiliated from SCD specialist care use three distinct pathways? Once unaffiliated individuals are found using the pathways, Investigators will employ linkage coordinators (trained staff) to engage these patients in care. Participants will be asked to fill out an assessment survey which will cover areas such as previous and current treatment, clinic and hospital experience, pain, and quality of life. Participants will also be given the option of participation in a 1-hour long interview how they feel about treatment for sickle cell disease including clinic experience, pain, and quality of life?

    at UCSF

  • Adult and Pediatric Participants With SCD

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, efficacy, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of osivelotor.

    at UCLA

  • Fostamatinib Disodium in the Treatment of Warm Antibody Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The primary objective of this study is: • To evaluate the long-term safety of fostamatinib in subjects with warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA).

    at UCLA

  • AG-946 in Participants With Anemia Due to Lower-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (LR-MDS)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This purpose of this study is to establish proof of concept of AG-946 in participants with LR-MDS in Phase 2a and to compare the effect of AG-946 versus placebo and to detect a dose response for erythroid response in participants with LR-MDS in Phase 2b.

    at UCLA

  • BIVV003 for Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Severe Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open label, multicenter, Phase 1/2 study in approximately eight adults with severe Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). The study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using BIVV003.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Inclacumab in Participants With Sickle Cell Disease Experiencing Vaso-occlusive Crises

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This Phase 3 study will assess the safety and efficacy of inclacumab, a P-selectin inhibitor, in reducing the frequency of vaso-occlusive crises (VOCs) in approximately 240 adult and adolescent participants (≥ 12 years of age) with sickle cell disease (SCD). Participants will be randomized to receive inclacumab or placebo.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • Alendronate for Osteonecrosis in Adults With Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    A prospective, single-arm, intervention study of oral alendronate in adults with sickle cell disease and osteonecrosis

    at UC Davis

  • Clinical Transplant-Related Long-term Outcomes of Alternative Donor Allogeneic Transplantation (BMT CTN 1702)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine if a search strategy of searching for an HLA-matched unrelated donor for allogeneic transplantation if possible then an alternative donor if an HLA-matched unrelated donor is not available versus proceeding directly to an alternative donor transplant will result in better survival for allogeneic transplant recipients within 2 years after study enrollment.

    at UCSD

  • Cord Blood Transplant With Dilanubicel for the Treatment of HIV Positive Hematologic Cancers

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of a cord blood transplant using dilanubicel and to see how well it works in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive hematologic (blood) cancers. After a cord blood transplant, the immune cells, including white blood cells, can take a while to recover, putting the patient at increased risk of infection. Dilanubicel consists of blood stem cells that help to produce mature blood cells, including immune cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Total body irradiation is a type of whole-body radiation. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a cord blood transplant with dilanubicel may help to kill any cancer cells that are in the body and make room in the patient's bone marrow for new stem cells to grow and reduce the risk of infection.

    at UCSF

  • AG-348 in Adult Participants With Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Previously Enrolled in AG-348-006 or AG348-C-007

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a multicenter, open-label, extension study to evaluate the long-term safety, tolerability, and efficacy of treatment with AG-348 in participants who were previously enrolled in Study AG348-C-006 or Study AG348-C-007.

    at UCSF

  • Gene Transfer for Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    A promising approach for the treatment of genetic diseases is called gene therapy. Gene therapy is a relatively new field of medicine that uses genetic material (mostly DNA) from the patient to treat his or her own disease. In gene therapy, the investigators introduce new genetic material in order to fix or replace the patient's disease gene, with the goal of curing the disease. The procedure is similar to a bone marrow transplant, in that the patient's malfunctioning blood stem cells are reduced or eliminated using chemotherapy, but it is different because instead of using a different person's (donor) blood stem cells for the transplant, the patient's own blood stem cells are given back after the new genetic material has been introduced into those cells. This approach has the advantage of eliminating any risk of GVHD, reducing the risk of graft rejection, and may also allow less chemotherapy to be utilized for the conditioning portion of the transplant procedure. The method used to introduce the gene into the patient's own blood stem cells is to engineer and use a modified version of a virus (called a 'vector') that efficiently inserts the "correcting" genetic material into the cells. The vector is a specialized biological medicine that has been formulated for use in human beings. The investigators have recently discovered a gene that is very important in the control of fetal hemoglobin expression. Increasing the expression of this gene in sickle cell patients could increase the amount of fetal hemoglobin while simultaneously reducing the amount of sickle hemoglobin in their blood, and therefore potentially cure the condition. In summary, the advantages of a gene therapy approach include: 1) it can be used even if the patient does not have a matched donor available; 2) it may allow a reduction in the amount of chemotherapy required to prepare the patient for the transplant; and 3) it will avoid the strong medicines often required to prevent and treat GVHD and rejection. The goal is to test whether this approach is safe, and whether using gene therapy to change the expression of this particular gene will lead to increased fetal hemoglobin production in people with sickle cell disease.

    at UCLA

  • Haplo T-Cell Depleted Transplantation in High-Risk Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is being done to determine the safety and outcome (long-term control) of a high-dose chemotherapy regimen followed by an infusion of CD34 selected (immune cells) stem cells from a partially matched adult family member donor, called haploidentical stem cell transplantation, in high-risk sickle cell disease patients. Funding Source - FDA OOPD

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplantation in Sickle Cell Patients (BMTCTN1507)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase II, single arm, multi-center trial, designed to estimate the efficacy and toxicity of haploidentical bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Based on their age and entry criteria patients are stratified into two groups: (1) children with severe SCD; and (2) adults with severe SCD.

    at UCSF

  • Ibrutinib and Rituximab Compared With Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial studies ibrutinib and rituximab to see how well they work compared to fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab in treating patients with untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody. It binds to a protein called CD20, which is found on B cells (a type of white blood cell) and some types of cancer cells. This may help the immune system kill cancer cells. It is not yet known whether fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab may work better than ibrutinib and rituximab in treating patients with untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma.

    at UC Irvine

  • In Utero Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Alpha-thalassemia Major (ATM)

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The investigators aims to evaluate the safety of in utero hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in fetuses with alpha-thalassemia major performed at the time of in utero transfusion of red blood cells.

    at UCSF

  • Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA)

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is a trial with an observational and an interventional arm, in patients with moderate to severe anemia and control subjects. The main purposes of this study is to phenotype the scope of neurocognitive deficits from iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in adult women, determine derangements in cerebral perfusion, vascular reactivity, functional connectivity, and blood brain barrier permeability in adult-onset IDA and relate them to neurocognitive deficits, as well as determine the reversibility and durability of both the physiologic and neurocognitive derangements by iron replacement therapy. All eligible subjects will be asked to provide informed consent before participating in the study.

    at UCLA

  • Lenalidomide With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Anemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies lenalidomide to see how well it works with or without epoetin alfa in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and anemia. Lenalidomide may stop the growth of myelodysplastic syndrome by blocking blood flow to the cells. Colony stimulating factors, such as epoetin alfa, may increase the number of immune cells found in bone marrow or peripheral blood. It is not yet known whether lenalidomide is more effective with or without epoetin alfa in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and anemia.

    at UC Davis

  • Pharmacodynamics and Safety of Epeleuton in Patients With Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    To assess the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of Epeleuton capsules in adult SCD patients who are aged ≥18 years.

    at UCLA

  • Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) Bone Pain Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    A prospective study to determine how low bone mineral density and/or vertebral compression fractures associate with pain in adults with sickle cell disease

    at UC Davis

  • Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This Phase I clinical trial will assess the safety and initial evidence for efficacy of an autologous transplant of lentiviral vector modified peripheral blood for adults with severe sickle cell disease.

    at UCLA

  • Long-term Treatment With Voxelotor in Participants Who Have Completed Treatment in Study GBT440-031

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Open Label Extension Study of Voxelotor Clinical Trial Participants with Sickle Cell Disease Who Participated in Voxelotor Clinical Trials

    at UCSF

  • GBT440 in Pediatrics With Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study consists of four parts, Parts A, B, C, and D. - Part A is a single dose pharmacokinetic (PK) study in pediatric participants with Sickle Cell Disease ages 6 to 17 years. - Part B is a multiple dose, safety, exploratory, efficacy, and PK study in adolescent participants with Sickle Cell Disease ages 12 to 17 years. - Part C is a multiple dose, safety, tolerability, and PK study, which includes the assessment of hematological effects and the effect on TCD flow velocity of voxelotor in pediatric participants with Sickle Cell Disease ages 4 to 17 years. - Part D is a multiple dose, safety, tolerability, and PK study, which examines the hematological effects of voxelotor in pediatric participants with Sickle Cell Disease ages 6 months to < 4 years.

    at UCSF

  • INTERCEPT Blood System for RBCs in Complex Cardiac Surgery Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of RBC transfusion for support of acute anemia in cardiovascular surgery patients based on the clinical outcome of renal impairment following transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) treated with the INTERCEPT Blood System (IBS) for Red Blood Cells compared to patients transfused with conventional RBCs.

    at UCLA

  • Transfusion of Prematures Trial

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The objective of the TOP trial is to determine whether higher hemoglobin thresholds for transfusing ELBW infants resulting in higher hemoglobin levels lead to improvement in the primary outcome of survival and rates of neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) at 22-26 months of age, using standardized assessments by Bayley.

    at UCLA

  • Transplantation of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats Modified Hematopoietic Progenitor Stem Cells (CRISPR_SCD001) in Patients With Severe Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is an open label, non-randomized, 2-center, phase 1/2 trial of a single infusion of sickle allele modified cluster of differentiation (CD34+) hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) in subjects with in subjects ≥12 years old to 35 years old severe Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). The study will evaluate the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using CRISPR/Cas9 edited red blood cells (known as CRISPR_SCD001 Drug Product).

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Unrelated Donor Transplant Versus Immune Therapy in Pediatric Severe Aplastic Anemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of comparing outcomes of patients treated de novo with immunosuppressive therapy (IST) versus matched unrelated donor (MUD) hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) for pediatric acquired severe aplastic anemia.

    at UCSF

  • Zinc Supplementation in Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The goal of this short term prospective Phase II study is to compare the effects of two alternate daily doses of zinc (25 and 40 mg/day) in 34 randomly assigned homozygous Sickle Cell Disease (SCD-SS) patients aged 15-35 years old. The main question it aims to answer is: Which biomarkers are most responsive to zinc supplementation, and what is the maximum tolerated zinc dose that induces the desired changes in biomarkers of bone turnover? Participants will be recruited from 7 American Society Hematology Research Collaborative SCD Centers. Eligible SCD subjects will be invited to participate in the 16-week study, involving 2 baseline blood draws 4 weeks apart, followed by a 12-week zinc intervention. The findings from this study will be used to determine the dosage of zinc to be used in a larger, future study on the long term impact of zinc supplementation on bone health in SCD-SS.

    at UCSF

  • COVID-19 Vaccine Response in Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to assess the antibody response to COVID-19 vaccination in a cohort of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and to assess vaccine and SCD related complications around the time of vaccination.

    at UCSF

  • Long - Term Follow Up of Sickle Cell Disease and Beta-thalassemia Subjects Previously Exposed to BIVV003 or ST-400.

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Primary Objectives: Long-term safety of BIVV003 in participants with severe sickle cell disease (SCD) and ST- 400 in participants with transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia (TDT) Secondary Objectives: - Long-term efficacy of the biological treatment effect of BIVV003 in SCD - Long-term efficacy of the clinical treatment effect of BIVV003 on SCD-related clinical events - Long-term efficacy of the biological treatment effect of ST-400 in TDT - Long-term efficacy of the clinical treatment effect of ST-400 in TDT

    at UCSF

  • Sickle Cell Disease Treated With Ex Vivo Gene Therapy

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a multi-center, long-term safety and efficacy follow-up study for subjects with sickle cell disease who have been treated with ex vivo gene therapy drug product in bluebird bio-sponsored clinical studies. After completing the parent clinical study (approximately 2 years), eligible subjects will be followed for an additional 13 years for a total of 15 years post-drug product infusion. No investigational drug product will be administered in the study.

    at UCSF

Our lead scientists for Anemia research studies include .

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