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Brain Tumor clinical trials at UC Health
28 in progress, 14 open to new patients

  • A Study of Ad-RTS-hIL-12 + Veledimex in Pediatric Subjects With Brain Tumors or DIPG

    open to eligible people ages up to 21 years

    This research study involves an investigational product: Ad-RTS-hIL-12 given with veledimex for production of human IL-12. IL-12 is a protein that can improve the body's natural response to disease by enhancing the ability of the immune system to kill tumor cells and may interfere with blood flow to the tumor. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of a single tumor injection of Ad-RTS-hIL-12 given with oral veledimex in the pediatric population.

    at UCSF

  • A Study of TAS-120 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, nonrandomized, Phase 1 dose-escalation, dose-expansion, and Phase 2 study targeting tumors with FGF/FGFR aberrations. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, PK, pharmacodynamic, and anti-tumor activity of TAS-120 in patients with advanced solid tumors with and without FGF/FGFR-related abnormalities. The study will be conducted in 3 parts, (1) Dose escalation to determine the MTD and/ or RP2D of TAS-120 in which this part of the study has been completed; (2) Phase 1 expansion to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of RP2D of TAS-120 in patients with tumors harboring specific FGFR aberrations, specifically in patients with cholangiocarcinoma, gliomas , urothelial carcinomas and any other tumors with FGFR fusion or activating mutation or amplification. Up to approximately 185 patients will be enrolled in the phase 1 expansion; and (3) Phase 2 study to confirm ORR of TAS-120 in intra-hepatic CCA patients with tumors harboring FGFR2 gene fusions. Approx. 100 patients will be enrolled in phase 2.

    at UCSF

  • Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, multicenter, global Phase 2 basket study of entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the treatment of patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK1/2/3, ROS1, or ALK gene fusion. Patients will be assigned to different baskets according to tumor type and gene fusion.

    at UCSF UCSD UC Irvine

  • Clinical Benefit of Using Molecular Profiling to Determine an Individualized Treatment Plan for Patients With High Grade Glioma

    open to eligible people ages up to 21 years

    This is a 2 strata pilot trial within the Pacific Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Consortium (PNOC). The study will use a new treatment approach based on each patient's tumor gene expression, whole-exome sequencing (WES), whole-genome sequencing (WGS), targeted panel profile (UCSF 500 gene panel), quantitative proteomics, and RNA-Seq. The current study will test the efficacy of such an approach in children with High-grade gliomas HGG.

    at UCSF

  • Delayed 18F-FDG PET/CT in Improving Visualization of Brain Tumors in Patients With Glioblastoma

    open to eligible people ages 18-99

    This clinical trial studies how well delayed fludeoxyglucose F-18 (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) works in improving visualization of brain tumors in patients with glioblastoma. Radiotracers such as 18F-FDG are highly taken up by tumors in the brain and are visualized using PET/CT. Increasing the interval of time between 18F-FDG administration and PET/CT scan may improve the visualization of brain tumors in patients with glioblastoma.

    at UCLA

  • Feasibility And Efficacy Of An iPad-Based Cognitive Rehabilitation Program In Brain Tumor Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well an iPad-based cognitive rehabilitation program works in improving quality of life in patients with grade II-III glioma. An iPad-based cognitive rehabilitation program may help to increase patients cognitive function and quality of life, and may provide doctors with valuable information for optimizing care of patients with brain tumors.

    at UCSF

  • Laser Ablation of Abnormal Neurological Tissue Using Robotic NeuroBlate System

    open to all eligible people

    The NeuroBlate® System (NBS) is a minimally invasive robotic laser thermotherapy tool that is being manufactured by Monteris Medical. Since it received FDA clearance in May 2009, the NBS has been used in over 1300 procedures conducted at approximately 56 leading institutions across United States. This is a prospective, multi-center registry that will include data collection up to 12 months to evaluate procedural success, local control failure rate, and QoL in up to 1,000 patients and up to 50 sites. Currently, the study has 162 subjects enrolled from 14 active sites

    at UCSD

  • Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Who Have Participated in Children's Oncology Group Studies

    open to all eligible people

    This clinical trial keeps track of and collects follow-up information from patients who are currently enrolled on or have participated in a Children's Oncology Group study. Developing a way to keep track of patients who have participated in Children's Oncology Group studies may allow doctors learn more about the long-term effects of cancer treatment and help them reduce problems related to treatment and improve patient quality of life.

    at UCLA UC Davis UCSF

  • Palliative 4pi Radiotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This pilot clinical trial studies the feasibility of palliative 4pi radiotherapy in treating patients with glioblastoma multiforme that has come back after standard chemoradiation. A new radiotherapy delivery planning system, called 4pi radiotherapy, may help improve radiation delivery by improving dose coverage to the treatment target, while reducing the dose to surrounding normal tissues.

    at UCLA

  • Phase 1/2 Study of LOXO-195 in Patients With Previously Treated NTRK Fusion Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 1 month and up

    This is a Phase 1/2, multi-center, open-label study designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of LOXO-195 when administered orally to patients age ≥ 1 month and older with NTRK fusion cancers treated with a prior TRK inhibitor.

    at UCLA

  • Pilot Study of Safety and Toxicity of Acquiring Hyperpolarized Carbon-13 Imaging in Children With Brain Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 3-18

    This is a single arm pilot trial within the Pacific Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Consortium (PNOC). The pilot study will look at the safety and toxicity of acquiring hyperpolarized carbon-13 imaging in children with brain tumors.

    at UCSF

  • Selinexor in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or High-Grade Gliomas

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor in treating younger patients with solid tumors or high-grade gliomas that have come back (recurred) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as selinexor, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

    at UCSF

  • Study of LOXO-101 (Larotrectinib) in Subjects With NTRK Fusion Positive Solid Tumors (NAVIGATE)

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    Phase II, multi-center, open-label study of patients with advanced solid tumors harboring a fusion of NTRK1, NTRK2 or NTRK3.

    at UCLA

  • Trial of CUDC-907 in Children and Young Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, CNS Tumors, or Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    This research study is evaluating a novel drug called CUDC-907 as a possible treatment for resistant (refractory) pediatric solid tumors (including neuroblastoma), lymphoma, or brain tumors.

    at UCSF

  • A Trial of Poly-ICLC in the Management of Recurrent Pediatric Low Grade Gliomas

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is for patients up to 21 years of age who have a tumor called a low grade glioma of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). The tumor has grown despite attempts to control it with chemotherapy or radiation. Low grade gliomas are a group of tumors that tend to grow slowly and could be cured if every bit of the tumor were surgically removed. These tumors are called Grade I or II astrocytomas. These tumors often grow in parts of the brain that prevent total removal without devastating neurologic complications or death. Although some low grade gliomas never grow, most will and are treated with either chemotherapy or radiation. There is good data showing that the growth of most low grade gliomas can be controlled with chemotherapy or radiation. However, some low grade gliomas in children and young adults grow despite these treatments. Poly-ICLC is a new drug that has been used safely in children and adults with different types of brain tumors. Earlier studies showed that this drug worked better for children and young adults with low grade gliomas than for children with more aggressive brain tumors. The main purpose of this study is to use Poly-ICLC treatment in a larger number of patients to see how well it works and how many side effects occur. As Poly-ICLC is not FDA approved, this study is authorized to use it under IND# 43984, held by Oncovir. Subjects will get injections of Poly-ICLC into muscle two times weekly. The first treatments will be given in the clinic so allergic or other severe reactions, if any, can be monitored. If subjects tolerate the injections and don't have a severe reaction, then the rest of the injections will be given at home. Subjects/caregivers will be trained to give injections. Treatment will last for about 2 years. Subjects may stay on treatment for longer than 2 years if their tumor shrinks in response to the injections, if study doctors think it is safe, if subjects want to remain on treatment, and if Poly-ICLC is available. Risks: Poly-ICLC has been used safely in children and adults at the dose used in this study, and at higher doses. Frequently seen side effects include irritation of the skin at the injection site and mild flu-like symptoms. These are usually relieved or avoided by use of over-the-counter medicines like acetaminophen (Tylenol). Funding Source: FDA OOPD

    at UCSD

  • An Investigational Immuno-therapy Study of Temozolomide Plus Radiation Therapy With Nivolumab or Placebo, for Newly Diagnosed Patients With Glioblastoma (GBM, a Malignant Brain Cancer)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate patients with glioblastoma that is MGMT-methylated (the MGMT gene is altered by a chemical change). Patients will receive temozolomide plus radiation therapy. They will be compared to patients receiving Nivolumab in addition to temozolomide plus radiation therapy.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Anti-LAG-3 or Urelumab Alone and in Combination With Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase I trial studies the safety and best dose of anti-LAG-3 (anti-LAG-3 monoclonal antibody BMS-986016) or urelumab alone and in combination with nivolumab in treating patients with glioblastoma that has returned (recurrent). Anti-LAG-3 monoclonal antibody BMS-986016, urelumab, and nivolumab are antibodies (a type of protein) that may stimulate the cells in the immune system to attack tumor cells. It is not yet known whether anti-LAG-3 monoclonal antibody BMS-986016 or urelumab alone or in combination with nivolumab may kill more tumor cells.

    at UCLA

  • Bevacizumab With or Without Trebananib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Brain Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This partially randomized phase II trial with a safety run-in component studies the side effects and how well bevacizumab given with or without trebananib works in treating patients with brain tumors that have come back (recurrent). Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Trebananib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor. It is not yet known whether giving bevacizumab together with trebananib is more effective than bevacizumab alone in treating brain tumors.

    at UC Irvine

  • Combination Adenovirus + Pembrolizumab to Trigger Immune Virus Effects

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Glioblastoma (GBM) and gliosarcoma (GS) are the most common and aggressive forms of malignant brain tumor in adults and can be resistant to conventional therapies. The purpose of this Phase II study is to evaluate how well a recurrent glioblastoma or gliosarcoma tumor responds to one injection of DNX-2401, a genetically modified oncolytic adenovirus, when delivered directly into the tumor followed by the administration of intravenous pembrolizumab (an immune checkpoint inhibitor) given every 3 weeks for up to 2 years or until disease progression. Funding Source-FDA OOPD

    at UCLA

  • Dendritic Cell Vaccine for Patients With Brain Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the most effective immunotherapy vaccine components in patients with malignant glioma. Teh investigators previous phase I study (IRB #03-04-053) already confirmed that this vaccine procedure is safe in patients with malignant brain tumors, and with an indication of extended survival in several patients. However, the previous trial design did not allow us to test which formulation of the vaccine was the most effective. This phase II study will attempt to dissect out which components are most effective together. Dendritic cells (DC) (cells which "present" or "show" cell identifiers to the immune system) isolated from the subject's own blood will be treated with tumor-cell lysate isolated from tumor tissue taken from the same subject during surgery. This pulsing (combining) of antigen-presenting and tumor lysate will be done to try to stimulate the immune system to recognize and destroy the patient's intracranial brain tumor. These pulsed DCs will then be injected back into the patient intradermally as a vaccine. The investigators will also utilize adjuvant imiquimod or poly ICLC (interstitial Cajal-like cell) in some treatment cohorts. It is thought that the host immune system might be taught to "recognize" the malignant brain tumor cells as "foreign" to the body by effectively presenting unique tumor antigens to the host immune cells (T-cells) in vivo.

    at UCLA

  • Gliogene: Brain Tumor Linkage Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The goal of this research study is to investigate the role of genes that may point to a higher risk of developing a glioma. Researchers will use new gene mapping techniques to study how high-risk factors are passed on through a family's genes and increase the risk of developing gliomas. Objectives: We propose an international multi-center, multidisciplinary study consortium, GLIOGENE, to identify susceptibility genes in high-risk familial brain tumor pedigrees using the most sophisticated genetic analysis methods available. To address our hypothesis, we propose the following specific aims: Aim 1: Establish a cohort of 400 high-risk pedigrees for genetic linkage analysis. To date, we have identified and collected biologic samples from 20 high-risk families that have met our criteria of 2 or more relatives diagnosed with a brain tumor. From the 15 centers in the United States and Europe, we will screen and obtain epidemiologic data from approximately 17,080 gliomas cases to identify a target of 400 families for genetic analysis. We will establish a cohort of the first and second-degree relatives from these glioma cases to obtain new knowledge about how cancer aggregates in glioma families. We will also acquire biospecimens (blood and tumor tissue), and risk factor data from relevant family members. Aim 2: Identify candidate regions linked to familial brain tumors. To strengthen evidence of linkage to regions found in our preliminary analysis and to identify additional regions linked to brain tumors, we will genotype informative glioma pedigrees identified in aim 1 using Affymetrix 10K GeneChip with markers spaced throughout the genome, and conduct a genome-wide multipoint linkage scan with these markers. Aim 3: Fine map the regions established in Aim 2 by genotyping selected SNPs from genome databases. We will attempt to further refine the regions identified in Aim 2 to less than 1cM by using approximately 1,500 - 2,000 carefully selected SNPs. The prioritization of regions will be based on a combination of the strength of evidence for linkage from families of various ethnic backgrounds and the presence of obvious candidate genes.

    at UCSF

  • Lapatinib Ditosylate Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This pilot phase I clinical trial studies how well lapatinib ditosylate before surgery works in treating patients with high-grade glioma that has come back after a period of time during which the tumor could not be detected. Lapatinib ditosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCLA

  • Observation or Radiation Therapy and/or Chemotherapy and Second Surgery in Treating Children Who Have Undergone Surgery for Ependymoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy use different ways to stop tumor cells from dividing so they stop growing or die. Giving chemotherapy before surgery may shrink the tumor so that it can be removed during surgery.

    PURPOSE: Phase II trial to determine the effectiveness of specialized radiation therapy either alone or after chemotherapy and second surgery in treating children who have undergone surgery for localized ependymoma.

    at UCSF UC Davis

  • Study of IDO Inhibitor and Temozolomide for Adult Patients With Primary Malignant Brain Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In this study, investigators will conduct a phase I/II trial in recurrent (temozolomide resistant) glioma patients. The overall goal of this study is to provide a foundation for future studies with indoximod tested in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients with radiation and temozolomide, or in combination with vaccine therapies.

    at UC Irvine

  • Study of Tesevatinib Monotherapy in Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a multicenter, Phase 2 study to assess the activity of tesevatinib in patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    at UCSF

  • Vaccine for Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Recurrent Low-Grade Glioma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary purpose of this phase II clinical trial is to determine the safety and effect on survival of patients autologous dendritic cells pulsed with autologous tumor lysate as a treatment for low-grade glioma patients. Other goals of this study are to determine if the vaccine can cause an immune response against patients' cancer cells and slow the growth of their brain tumors

    at UCLA

  • Vaccine Therapy With Bevacizumab Versus Bevacizumab Alone in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well giving vaccine therapy with or without bevacizumab works in treating patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme that can be removed by surgery. Vaccines consisting of heat shock protein-peptide complexes made from a person's own tumor tissue may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that may remain after surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them. It is not yet known whether giving vaccine therapy is more effective with or without bevacizumab in treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    at UCSF

  • Vorinostat and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Malignant Gliomas

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial is studying the side effects and best dose of vorinostat when given together with temozolomide in treating patients with malignant gliomas. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vorinostat and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Vorinostat may also stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Vorinostat may help temozolomide work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drug. Giving vorinostat together with temozolomide may kill more tumor cells.

    at UCLA UCSF

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