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Pain clinical trials at UC Health

40 in progress, 18 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Aging People Living With HIV in Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 50 years and up

    Chronic pain impacts a large proportion of aging people living with HIV (aPLWH) and involves factors directly related to HIV (neurotoxicity) and psychosocial co-morbidities common in aPLWH (i.e. social isolation and loneliness). The investigators hypothesize that novel interventions that acknowledge these psychosocial co-morbidities may improve the efficacy of chronic pain management and minimize the use of potentially dangerous medications. This grant proposes to adapt and pilot a pain psychotherapy approach using group acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in aPLWH with chronic pain.

    at UCSD

  • Acute Pain Management in Patients on Opioid Replacement Therapy

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    This is an outpatient randomized within subject placebo-controlled human laboratory investigation of analgesia (as assessed with quantitative sensory testing; QST) from ketamine alone and in combination with hydromorphone in buprenorphine maintained participants. The goals of this project are to characterize the analgesic, subjective, and physiologic effects of ketamine combined with hydromorphone in patients on buprenorphine maintenance for opioid use disorder.

    at UCSF

  • Anesthetics and Analgesics in Children

    open to eligible people ages 2-17

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety profile of anesthetics and analgesics in children and adolescents.

    at UCSF

  • At-home study of virtual museum experiences to reduce social isolation and pain

    “Can virtual museum programs help individuals with chronic pain feel more socially connected? Help us find out!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Aim 1: To conduct a formative evaluation of museum-based programming to address loneliness and social isolation. Aim 2: To develop a consensus-derived Model Museum-Based Program (MMBP) to address loneliness among individuals with chronic pain. Aim 3: To evaluate the feasibility of museum experiences to reduce loneliness and pain among isolated individuals with chronic pain. Due to safety concerns related to the covid pandemic in-person museum programming could not continue and virtual versions of the interventions were created. We will publish results on both the in-person and virtual versions of the intervention as well as a pooled analysis.

    at UC Davis

  • Chronic Low Back Pain and Meditation

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The purpose of this research study is to see if and how mindfulness meditation affects pain. Specifically, we are interested in assessing if mindfulness is associated with the release of naturally occurring opiates in the body, in response to intravenous (IV) administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone during a chronic low back pain provoking procedure.

    at UCSD

  • Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 22-80

    Chronic pain affects 1 in 4 US adults, and many cases are resistant to almost any treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) holds promise as a new option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant chronic pain, but traditional approaches target only brain regions involved in one aspect of the pain experience and provide continuous 24/7 brain stimulation which may lose effect over time. By developing new technology that targets multiple, complimentary brain regions in an adaptive fashion, the investigators will test a new therapy for chronic pain that has potential for better, more enduring analgesia.

    at UCSF

  • Closed-loop Deep Brain Stimulation to Treat Refractory Neuropathic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) holds promise as a new option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant chronic pain, but current technology is unable to reliably achieve long-term pain symptom relief. A "one-size-fits-all" approach of continuous, 24/7 brain stimulation has helped patients with some movement disorders, but the key to reducing pain may be the activation of stimulation only when needed, as this may help keep the brain from adapting to stimulation effects. By expanding the technological capabilities of an investigative brain stimulation device, the investigators will enable the delivery of stimulation only when pain signals in the brain are high, and then test whether this more personalized stimulation leads to reliable symptom relief for chronic pain patients over extended periods of time.

    at UCSF

  • Does Single Injection Adductor Canal Block Improve Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Receiving Periarticular Local Anesthesia Injections for Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of the study is to determine the effect of a single injection adductor canal block (ACB) on pain scores within 24 hours post total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

    at UC Irvine

  • Empower Opioid Misuse & Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This study evaluates the effects of peripheral nerve stimulation on opioid craving and use and pain in participants with chronic non-cancer pain (NCP) and opioid misuse. Participants will be randomized to receive the active or sham control treatment for the duration of the study.

    at UCSF

  • Mindful Action for Pain

    open to all eligible people

    An emerging scientific model that has been applied to chronic pain is the psychological flexibility (PF) model. PF refers to the ability to behave consistently with one's values even in the face of unwanted thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations such as pain. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is the best known treatment derived from the PF model and is as effective as the gold standard Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), but falls short on achieving meaningful changes in functional improvement. Although ACT was designed to impact PF, methods from different treatment approaches are also consistent with the model. An experiential strategy that holds promise for enhancing PF is formal mindfulness meditation, a practice used to train non-judgmental awareness and attention to present-moment experiences, which has never been tested within the PF model. There is compelling theoretical and empirical rationale that the mechanisms underlying formal mindfulness meditation will bolster PF processes and thereby can be applied to facilitate functional improvement. To test this, the principal investigator, has developed a novel 8-week group-based intervention, Mindful Action for Pain (MAP), which integrates formal mindfulness meditation with experiential methods from different evidence-based treatment approaches in accordance with the PF model. MAP is designed such that daily mindfulness meditation practice is used to develop the capacity to more completely utilize strategies to address the key psychosocial barriers (e.g., pain catastrophizing) to optimal functioning. This CDA-2 project consists of two phases. Phase 1 (years 1 - 2) consists of using qualitative and quantitative methods to iteratively develop and refine MAP over the course of 4 MAP cycles (n = 20). Phase 2 (years 3 - 5) consists of a pilot RCT (n = 86) of MAP vs. CBT for chronic pain (CBT-CP) in order to establish feasibility of a future large-scale trial and estimate the preliminary impact of MAP. Functional improvement will be measured by reductions in pain interference (primary clinical outcome). Further, meditation adherence will be assessed to explore dose-response relationships with functional improvement, and objective measures of physical activity (actigraphy) will be captured to explore the psychophysical impact of MAP.

    at UCSD

  • Mindfulness and Chronic Low Back Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The purpose of this study is to see if mindfulness, a form of mental training, or listening to a book alters brain activation in response to raising your leg that may produce the feeling of pain. A technique called functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows scientists to determine which parts of the brain are active during a particular task. This study will provide new information about how mindfulness affects the brain.

    at UCSD

  • Pragmatic Research of Acupuncture and Counseling eXtended to Inpatient Services

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    Despite improved assessment and pharmacologic management, cancer pain is still undertreated. Using non-pharmacologic treatments alongside medications may better address patients' total pain experience by relieving physical and psychological symptoms and reducing the adverse effects of drugs. However, our knowledge of the benefits of multidisciplinary approaches in real-world hospital settings is limited. Patients want to know "How can I get the most pain relief with the fewest side effects?" This study proposal is designed to address this question by testing how combining pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic (acupuncture and pain counseling) treatments can: (1) maximize effectiveness, (2) minimize harms, and (3) align with patients' preferences.

    at UCSF

  • Pudendal Enhancement of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) for Reconstructive Surgery (PEERS)

    open to eligible females ages 18-99

    Patients will undergo their vaginal reconstructive surgery in the usual manner, but will also be randomly assigned on the day of surgery to either receive the extra injection of numbing medication at the onset of surgery or not. The chances they will be assigned to the additional injection is 50%. Their care in the hospital and after surgery will be the same. They will participate in the study for a total of 6 weeks during which time they will be asked to complete two phone surveys, during which a provider will check in on pain level and pain medication use, and one office visit at 6 weeks. The office visit is part of their routine care and would be a scheduled visit regardless if they participated in the study or not. If they are unable to return to the office for a postoperative visit at 6 weeks, they will be contact by phone instead to obtain information on satisfaction with postoperative care, any complications after surgery, and overall how they are doing after surgery.

    at UCLA

  • Regional Blocks for Lateral Condyle Fractures

    open to eligible people ages 4-12

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the post-operative pain control in pediatric patients with closed lateral condyle fractures who undergo open reduction and percutaneous pinning. Patients will be randomized into one of two groups. Group 1 will receive an infraclavicular nerve block to the affected extremity by a fellowship trained pediatric anesthesiologist prior to surgery. Group 2 will undergo the Orthopaedic Institute of Children's (OIC) standard preoperative protocol. Post-operative pain management will be the same for both groups per standard protocol. Pain level will be assessed post-operatively using the Wong-Baker FACES scale and parents will be asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding their satisfaction with the surgery and pain control. Parents will also fill out a medication log until the patient no longer requires pain medication. All patients in both groups will receive standard oxycodone solution prescriptions post-operatively as per typical protocol. The duration of participation in the study is approximately 1 week and requires 2 visits (time of recruitment at surgery and 1st post-op visit). This study is being conducted in hopes of developing comprehensive pain management protocols to reduce opioid consumption after surgical fixations of displaced lateral condyle fractures if the study can show that patients are more satisfied and require less opioid medication when receiving preoperative regional anesthesia.

    at UCLA

  • StimRouter Registry Clinical Protocol

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This Registry study will prospectively evaluate the long-term effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of the StimRouter Neuromodulation System, along with evaluating the technical performance of StimRouter, surgical outcomes, health-related quality of life, concomitant medical use, and subject's impression of improvement.

    at UCSD

  • The Effect of Chronic Pain on Delay Discounting in Methadone Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The epidemic of opioid overdose deaths continues to rise, killing more persons in 2017 than HIV/AIDS at the height of that epidemic. Medication assisted treatment, including methadone and buprenorphine, is the standard of care for the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD). However, chronic pain can reduce treatment efficacy during medication assisted treatment and is associated with illicit substance relapse, dropout, and subsequent overdose. Mechanisms by which chronic pain may influence the impulsive decision making (e.g., drug relapse) in persons with OUD have not been well characterized. A better understanding is needed of decision-making in this population. Two factors that can influence decisions to use drugs are impulsivity and acute opioid withdrawal. This proposal will test how chronic pain is associated with increases in impulsive decision making in OUD, whether impulsive decision making is greater when undergoing opioid withdrawal, and how catastrophizing may modify the association between withdrawal and impulsive decision making in patients with chronic pain and OUD. An ideal population for this developmental research project are methadone maintained patients, who show high treatment attendance rates and will therefore assure study efficiency and reliable completion.

    at UCSF

  • The Enso Study for Chronic Low Back Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Enso is a portable device for the treatment of chronic and acute types of musculoskeletal pain. This study is being designed as a double-blinded, sham-controlled randomized clinical trial.

    at UCSF

  • Trans-MAPP II Study of Urologic Chronic Pelvin Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network has been established by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to focus on a broader approach to the study of Interstitial Cystitis (IC)/ Bladder Pain Syndrome (BPS) in men and women, and Chronic Prostatitis (CP)/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS) in men, than previously undertaken. Patients with IC or CP are being recruited for a new study called the "Trans-MAPP Study of Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain: Symptom Patterns Study (SPS). This research study will recruit Control Participants to better understand the symptoms of individuals with some form of IC or CP. As with many chronic pain disorders, IC and CP are poorly understood, and treatment is often not helpful. The goal of this study is to better understand how pain is felt in people with IC or CP and the investigators hope that this study will lead to improvement in the treatment of IC and CP.

    at UCLA

  • An Innovative Tailored Intervention for Improving Children's Postoperative Recovery (WebTIPS)

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The goal of this randomized trial is to examine the effectiveness of a tailored Internet-based Preparation Program (WebTIPS) in reducing anxiety and improving the recovery process in children undergoing surgery. Two hospitals and all parent-child dyads and healthcare providers (HCPs) will be randomized to either a Web-based Tailored Intervention Preparation for Surgery (WebTIPS) Group or to a Web-based Information (WebINFO) Group, the attention control group. The WebTIPS group will receive the newly developed intervention with short message service (SMS) two-way communication between an HCP and patient, while the WebINFO Group will only receive an internet and mobile platform with information on the management of preoperative anxiety and perioperative pain. The aims of this study are to: Primary aim: Quality of Clinical Care: Determine whether and to what extent WebTIPS is more effective than an attention control intervention in reducing preoperative anxiety among children ages 2-7 years old undergoing anesthesia and outpatient surgery. Secondary aims: Quality of Clinical Care: 1. Examine the impact of WebTIPS on Post-Anesthesia care unit based postoperative clinical recovery parameters, such as pain and emergence delirium. 2. Examine the impact of WebTIPS on home-based postoperative clinical recovery parameters such as pain, new onset behavioral changes and return to normal daily activity over 2 weeks. 3. Determine if the use of WebTIPS reduces parental preoperative anxiety. Experience of Care: Examine the effects of WebTIPS on parental satisfaction with the overall experience of the surgical episode. Cost of Care/Resource Use: Determine if WebTIPS modifies healthcare resource use, as measured by 30-day charges adjusted for Medicaid cost-to-charge ratios.

    at UC Irvine

  • Analgesic and Subjective Effects of Terpenes

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this research is to assess the analgesic and subjective effects of terpenes administered alone and in combination of THC.

    at UCLA

  • Cannabis Effects as a Function of Sex (CanSex)

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this research is to assess the impact of cannabis on the analgesic and abuse-related effects between men and women

    at UCLA

  • Cryoanalgesia to Prevent Acute and Chronic Pain Following Surgery: A Randomized, Double-Masked, Sham-Controlled Study

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The ultimate objective of the proposed line of research is to determine if cryoanalgesia is an effective adjunctive treatment for pain in the period immediately following various painful surgical procedures; and, if this analgesic modality decreases the risk of persistent postoperative pain, or "chronic" pain. The objective of the proposed pilot study is to optimize the protocol and collect data to power subsequent, definitive clinical trials. Specific Aim 1: To determine if, compared with current and customary analgesia, the addition of cryoanalgesia decreases the incidence and severity of post-surgical pain. Hypothesis 1a (primary): The severity of surgically-related pain will be significantly decreased on postoperative day 2 with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 1b: The incidence of chronic pain will be significantly decreased one year following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 1c: The severity of chronic pain will be significantly decreased one year following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Specific Aim 2: To determine if, compared with current and customary analgesia, the addition of cryoanalgesia improves postoperative functioning. Hypothesis 2a: Following primary unilateral knee and shoulder arthroplasty as well as rotator cuff repair, joint range of motion will be significantly increased within the year following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 2b: Following video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, inspiratory spirometry will be improved within the month following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment.

    at UCSD

  • DBS of the SCC for the Treatment of Medically Refractory CLBP

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of deep brain stimulation of the subgenual cingulate cortex for the treatment of chronic medically-refractory low back pain using a randomized double-blind crossover design.

    at UCLA

  • Distraction with Virtual Reality (VR) for Anxiety During Pain Procedures in the Interventional Pain Clinic

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of VR distraction on reducing anxiety patients undergoing interventional pain procedures compared to placebo/active placebo or a non VR option.

    at UC Davis

  • Gabapentin and Tizanidine for Insomnia in Chronic Pain

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover trial aimed at assessing the effect of gabapentin and tizanidine, two pain medications, on insomnia in chronic pain patients.

    at UCSD

  • Improving Communication About Pain and Opioids

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The overall goal of this protocol is to pilot test a clinician training intervention that uses standardized patients (trained actors playing patient roles) as instructors who impart communication skills to primary care clinicians. This project will conduct a pilot clinical trial of the intervention developed by the primary investigator in order to evaluate intervention feasibility and generate data to plan a subsequent fully-powered, multisite trial. Primary care clinicians will be randomized to receive either the intervention or control; 48 patients (2 per clinician) will then be recorded during clinic visits with study clinicians and will provide data on post-visit perceptions and health outcomes. Study hypotheses are that visits with clinicians who receive the intervention (versus control) will be associated with more frequent use of targeted communication skills, lower probability of high-risk opioid prescribing, higher patient-reported agreement with treatment plan, and lower pain interference 2 months later.

    at UC Davis

  • INTRACEPT: Prospective, Randomized, Multi-center Study Intraosseous Basivertebral Nerve Ablation for Treatment of CLBP

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Subjects will be randomized 1:1 Radio Frequency (RF) Ablation arm vs Control arm; this is an open-label trial. Subjects in the the RF Ablation arm will receive the Intracept System procedure to treat up to 4 vertebral bodies (L3 to S1). Subjects in the Control arm will continue on non-surgical management therapies to treat their chronic low back pain (CLBP) and will be offered optional crossover after 12 months of follow-up.

    at UC Davis

  • Measuring Chronic Pain Impact: Measurement Enhancement for Chronic Pain

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Many complementary and integrative health approaches have been shown to be effective for chronic pain and included in guidelines. This evidence of effectiveness is built on hundreds of studies representing millions of research dollars, and the ability to analyze and better compare results across these studies is essential to obtain the full value of this investment. However, useful across-study comparisons which would allow better understanding and targeting of these interventions are hampered by at least two challenges: the lack of common outcome measures and the inability to meaningfully stratify or classify patients. The first two Aims of this study each address one of these two challenges. The last Aim takes advantage of this study to further test the viability of MTurk as a data collection platform. Specific Aim 1 addresses the lack of common outcome measures. This Aim is to develop and evaluate links or crosswalks between the PROMIS-29 and other common (legacy) measures used for chronic pain so that the results of studies using different measures can be compared. Our hypothesis here is that we will be able to create some sort of linkage between PROMIS and legacy measures that will allow for each pair estimates of one to be made from the other. Specific Aim 2 addresses the inability to meaningfully stratify or subclassify chronic pain patients. This Aim is to evaluate and refine the chronic pain impact stratification scheme (ISS) proposes by the NIH Research Task Force on chronic low back pain, which is based on 9 PROMIS-29 items. Our hypothesis here is that the ISS can be refined so that it can identify subgroups of chronic pain patients with different levels of morbidity and different needs for treatment. Specific Aim 3 addresses the potential for more efficient data collection using the MTurk platform. This Aim is to evaluate MTurk as a cost- and time-efficient method to collect quality data on individuals with chronic pain. Our hypothesis here is that we find that MTurk produces data of sufficient quality to be of use to future research projects.

    at UCLA

  • Mechanisms of Affective Touch in Chronic Pain

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study compares how different types of touch found in massage therapies impact pain perception, and whether these effects differ in individuals with and without chronic pain. This study also examines psychological factors that may predict differences in touch perception in individuals with chronic pain. This research will improve our understanding of whether and how massage therapies can benefit pain and health, and whether this differs in people who suffer from chronic pain.

    at UCSD

  • Neurofeedback-EEG-VR System for Non-opioid Pain Therapy

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study will assess the feasibility of developing the Neurofeedback-EEG-VR (NEVR) system for non-opioid pain therapy. Subjects suffering from pain will undergo sessions involving VR and Neurofeedback training and their pain will be assessed.

    at UCSD

  • Opioid Approach Bias Modification

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    To investigate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying opioid approach bias during a pilot RCT of opioid approach bias modification. The investigators are combining novel ultra-high field MRI technology with the promising treatment of modifying cognitive bias away from detrimental prescription drug use will generate novel neural data and potentially yield a new therapeutic tool to reduce problematic opioid use.

    at UCSF

  • Optimal Management of Pain in Hospitalized Patients - Opioid Tolerant Populations.

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Pain is a symptom that drives hospital admissions, and pain management is required by most patients during their hospital stay. Further, the use of medications such as opioids can lead to upward-spiraling doses, especially among chronic pain patients whose resource utilization rates are high. Many initiatives aim to reduce the costs of these "high-resource utilizing" patients. One exciting aspect of improving the management of pain is that this may help prevent patients from ever becoming high-cost in the first place. The purpose of this study is to examine the impacts of an early and sustained intervention pathway, in comparison to the current standard of care, for the treatment of pain in opioid tolerant patients. It is hypothesized that patients randomized to the intervention pathway, in comparison to the control, will lead to decreased costs of care, a reduction in opioid usage within 3 and 6 months, and decrease in hospital readmission rates.

    at UC Irvine

  • Perineural Local Anesthetic Administration With a Continuous Infusion Versus Automatic Intermittent Boluses

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This will be a randomized comparison of continuous local anesthetic infusion with patient controlled boluses (PCA) to automated boluses with PCA for continuous popliteal sciatic nerve blocks. The goal will be to determine the relationship between method of local anesthetic administration (continuous with PCA initiated at discharge vs. intermittent dosing with PCA with a 5-hour delay) for continuous peripheral nerve block and the resulting pain control and duration of analgesia.

    at UCSD

  • Placebo-controlled Study to Evaluate Rexlemestrocel-L Alone or Combined With Hyaluronic Acid in Subjects With Chronic Low Back Pain

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 3 study designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Mesoblast's rexlemestrocel-L alone or combined with hyaluronic acid (HA) in subjects with chronic low back pain (> 6 months) associated with moderate radiographic degenerative changes of a disc

    at UC Davis

  • Pragmatic Trial of WHT vs. PC-GE to Promote Non-Pharmacological Strategies to Treat Chronic Pain in Veterans

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The overarching goal of this Pain Management Collaboratory Demonstration project is to test a new Whole Health paradigm for chronic pain care, emphasizing non-pharmacological pain self-management that is hypothesized to reduce pain symptoms and improve overall functioning and quality of life in Veterans. In UH3 Aim 1, the investigators will conduct a 12-month pragmatic effectiveness trial at 5 VA sites across the country to test whether veterans with moderate to severe chronic pain randomized to receive the Whole Health Team (WHT) intervention are more likely than those receiving Primary Care Group Education (PC-GE) to: Hypothesis 1: Experience improved pain interference (primary outcome), pain intensity, functioning and quality of life (secondary outcomes); Hypothesis 2: Decrease use of higher-risk pain medications, including opioids, or high-risk combinations; Hypothesis 3: Engage in a greater number of non-pharmacological pain management activities; and Hypothesis 4: Experience improved mental health-related symptoms, including sleep problems and suicidality. In addition, both the WHT and PC-GE arms will be compared to a third group of veterans randomized to Usual Primary Care (UPC, Control) on the same primary and secondary outcomes above. After the baseline assessment, masked telephone assessments will be administered to participants at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. UH3 Aim 2 is to conduct a process evaluation of the two active interventions (WHT and PC-GE) and a budget impact analysis that includes costs to implement and execute the two active interventions as well as the control condition (UPC) to inform the development of an implementation toolkit for scaling and dissemination. Eligible participants are veterans reporting moderate to severe chronic pain present every day or nearly every day for ≥ 6 months. The total sample size for the population is based on our main study aim/hypothesis and is N=745. This breaks down to n=341 in each of the active interventions (WHT and PC-GE) and N=63 in the Usual Primary Care arm (Control). Results of this UG3/UH3 Pain Management Collaboratory Demonstration project will contribute to the overall mission of the NIH/VA/DoD initiative to build national-level infrastructure that supports non-pharmacologic pain management in veterans and military service personnel.

    at UCSF

  • ReActiv8 Implantable Neurostimulation System for Chronic Low Back Pain

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this trial is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ReActiv8 for the treatment of adults with Chronic Low Back Pain and no prior spine surgery when used in conjunction with medical management.

    at UCSD

  • Standard of Care Therapy With or Without Stereotactic Radiosurgery and/or Surgery in Treating Patients With Limited Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well standard of care therapy with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery works and compares it to standard of care therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to one or two locations in the body (limited metastatic) that are previously untreated. Standard of care therapy comprising chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy, and others may help stop the spread of tumor cells. Radiation therapy and/or surgery is usually only given with standard of care therapy to relieve pain; however, in patients with limited metastatic breast cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, may be able to send x-rays directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue and surgery may be able to effectively remove the metastatic tumor cells. It is not yet known whether standard of care therapy is more effective with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery in treating limited metastatic breast cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

  • Survivorship Care in Reducing Symptoms in Young Adult Cancer Survivors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized clinical trial studies survivorship care in reducing symptoms in young adult cancer survivors. Survivorship care programs that identify the needs of young adult cancer survivors and ways to support them through the years after treatment may help reduce symptoms, such as pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and distress, in young adult cancer survivors.

    at UCLA

  • Weighted Blankets and Chronic Pain

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The purpose of the study is to test whether the use of weighted blankets can change the experience of chronic pain and to examine if social, psychological, or health factors influence the perception of the blanket. Multiple blanket weights will be tested.

    at UCSD

  • Yoga and Mantram for Chronic Pain and PTSD

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    PTSD is prevalent among Veterans and is associated with physical and functional impairments in addition to PTSD symptoms. Veterans with PTSD experience more chronic pain and pain-related functional limitations than Veterans without PTSD. Mind-body interventions such as yoga and meditation are non-pharmacological options for treating both chronic pain and PTSD. This pilot study will add an existing mantram repetition (MR) component designed for Veterans with PTSD to an active yoga intervention known to improve function in chronic back pain patients. The study will examine the acceptability of the interventions, adverse events, and the feasibility of recruitment, attendance, retention, treatment fidelity, and assessments by recruiting and randomizing 32 VA patients with PTSD to either yoga plus MR or to a relaxation/health education control. Health outcomes including pain-related function, pain, and PTSD symptoms will be measured. If feasible, the data will be used to plan a full-scale trial of enhanced yoga for pain in VA patients with PTSD.

    at UCSD

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