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Pain clinical trials at University of California Health

54 in progress, 33 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Aging People Living With HIV in Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 50 years and up

    Chronic pain impacts a large proportion of aging people living with HIV (aPLWH) and involves factors directly related to HIV (neurotoxicity) and psychosocial co-morbidities common in aPLWH (i.e. social isolation and loneliness). The investigators hypothesize that novel interventions that acknowledge these psychosocial co-morbidities may improve the efficacy of chronic pain management and minimize the use of potentially dangerous medications. This grant proposes to adapt and pilot a pain psychotherapy approach using group acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in aPLWH with chronic pain.

    at UCSD

  • Analgesic and Subjective Effects of Terpenes

    open to eligible people ages 21-55

    The purpose of this research is to assess the analgesic and subjective effects of terpenes administered alone and in combination of THC.

    at UCLA

  • Assessment of Urinary Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) Technology in the Evaluation and Management of Females With Chronic Bladder Pain and Cystitis-like Symptoms

    open to eligible females ages 18-80

    Real-world clinical practice multicenter study to determine the clinical implications of employing PCR/NGS technology to identify and treat potential urinary pathogens in female participants identified with bladder pain and/or cystitis-like symptoms.

    at UCLA

  • Brain Imaging Biomarkers for Response to Spinal Cord Stimulation in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    In this protocol, "Brain imaging biomarkers for response to Spinal Cord Stimulation in patients with chronic low back pain," the investigators plan to perform brain mapping studies in 42 patients who are undergoing spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for chronic low back pain (CLBP) as part of the participants normal clinical care during a 2-year period. This imagining study is completed for research purposes. There is no standard of care imaging for the participants. This study requires two visits in total. During the baseline visit, participants will undergo imaging acquisition protocol and corresponding assessments. Participants will have another follow-up visit (potentially remotely) for final assessments two weeks after the SCS treatment. The objective of the study is to investigate potential imaging biomarkers that can predict response to the SCS treatment. Specifically, the investigators hypothesize that the connectivity of a certain region of the brain (specifically the subgenual cingulate) prior to SCS may serve as a possible pre-operative imaging-based biomarker on response to SCS. The findings of the study may further enhance investigators understanding of the connectivity between brain areas that are critical to the therapeutic response to SCS in CLBP patients and that can be used as a putative biomarker to select patients who may respond to SCS.

    at UCLA

  • Cannabis Effects as a Function of Sex (CanSex)

    open to eligible people ages 21-55

    The purpose of this research is to assess the impact of cannabis on the analgesic and abuse-related effects between men and women

    at UCLA

  • Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 22-80

    Chronic pain affects 1 in 4 US adults, and many cases are resistant to almost any treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) holds promise as a new option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant chronic pain, but traditional approaches target only brain regions involved in one aspect of the pain experience and provide continuous 24/7 brain stimulation which may lose effect over time. By developing new technology that targets multiple, complimentary brain regions in an adaptive fashion, the investigators will test a new therapy for chronic pain that has potential for better, more enduring analgesia.

    at UCSF

  • Compassion Meditation vs. Health Education for Veterans

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Chronic pain (CP) is a major health problem for military Veterans, and CP is often associated with comorbid mental health problems, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. CP with psychological comorbidity is associated with increased healthcare costs, medication use, risk of suicide and rates of disability and reduced quality of life. Current empirically supported treatments do not always lead to substantial improvements (up to 50% of patients drop out or are do not respond to treatment). This project was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel intervention for addressing these challenges. Compassion meditation (CM), a meditative practice that focuses on the wish to remove suffering, is a contemplative practice that has promise for the amelioration of physical and mental health problems as well as promoting positive affect and improving quality of life. This study will evaluate the efficacy of Cognitively-Based Compassion Training for Chronic Pain with Psychological Comorbidity (CBCT-CP+) compared to Health Education while Living with Pain (H.E.L.P.) control condition, in a sample of among Veterans with CP conditions and psychological comorbidity.

    at UCSD

  • DBS of the SCC for the Treatment of Medically Refractory CLBP

    open to eligible people ages 50-75

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of deep brain stimulation of the subgenual cingulate cortex for the treatment of chronic medically-refractory low back pain using a randomized double-blind crossover design.

    at UCLA

  • Dexmedotomidine for Acute Pain Control in Patients With Multiple Rib FracturesRandomized Controlled Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Blunt chest trauma is the second most common form of unintentional trauma in the US and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Thoracic injuries are the third most common cause of death in trauma patients. Rib fractures have an increased associated risk of pneumonia, prolonged hospitalization, and cost. The associated severe pain leads to poor pulmonary mechanics, which contributes to additional complications. Treatment for rib fractures is focused on optimizing analgesia and intense pulmonary hygiene. Most common strategies utilize early mobilization, incentive spirometry (IS), and multimodal pain regimens. A variety of techniques for analgesia after blunt chest trauma exist. Epidural analgesia is one of the best-studied methods and can often provide significant pain relief. However, this method is invasive, has associated complications, and often can be contraindicated due to coagulopathy or other injuries. Most often a form of multimodal pain strategy is utilized which incorporates acetaminophen, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), trans-dermal lidocaine, and muscle relaxants. Opioids remain an important adjunct to control severe pain, however, narcotics have their own associated complications. The aim of our study is to use an infusion of dexmedetomidine (Precedex) to aid in pain management in patients presenting with 3 or more rib fractures. The investigators hypothesize that dexmedetomidine will decrease patient pain and opioid use.

    at UC Irvine

  • Digital Versus Conventional Physical Therapy for Chronic Shoulder Tendinopathy

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    This is a single-center, prospective, randomised, controlled study, with two parallel groups, designed to assess the clinical impact of a digital exercise program against conventional rehabilitation for shoulder tendonitis. The hypothesis is that all the clinical outcomes measured will significantly improve after the program, and patients using this novel system will attain at least the same outcomes than the ones attained by the conventional PT group.

    at UCSF

  • Does Single Injection Adductor Canal Block Improve Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Receiving Periarticular Local Anesthesia Injections for Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of the study is to determine the effect of a single injection adductor canal block (ACB) on pain scores within 24 hours post total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

    at UC Irvine

  • Measuring Chronic Pain Impact: Measurement Enhancement for Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Many complementary and integrative health approaches have been shown to be effective for chronic pain and included in guidelines. This evidence of effectiveness is built on hundreds of studies representing millions of research dollars, and the ability to analyze and better compare results across these studies is essential to obtain the full value of this investment. However, useful across-study comparisons which would allow better understanding and targeting of these interventions are hampered by at least two challenges: the lack of common outcome measures and the inability to meaningfully stratify or classify patients. The first two Aims of this study each address one of these two challenges. The last Aim takes advantage of this study to further test the viability of MTurk as a data collection platform. Specific Aim 1 addresses the lack of common outcome measures. This Aim is to develop and evaluate links or crosswalks between the PROMIS-29 and other common (legacy) measures used for chronic pain so that the results of studies using different measures can be compared. Our hypothesis here is that we will be able to create some sort of linkage between PROMIS and legacy measures that will allow for each pair estimates of one to be made from the other. Specific Aim 2 addresses the inability to meaningfully stratify or subclassify chronic pain patients. This Aim is to evaluate and refine the chronic pain impact stratification scheme (ISS) proposes by the NIH Research Task Force on chronic low back pain, which is based on 9 PROMIS-29 items. Our hypothesis here is that the ISS can be refined so that it can identify subgroups of chronic pain patients with different levels of morbidity and different needs for treatment. Specific Aim 3 addresses the potential for more efficient data collection using the MTurk platform. This Aim is to evaluate MTurk as a cost- and time-efficient method to collect quality data on individuals with chronic pain. Our hypothesis here is that we find that MTurk produces data of sufficient quality to be of use to future research projects.

    at UCLA

  • Mechanisms of Affective Touch in Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study compares how different types of touch found in massage therapies impact pain perception, and whether these effects differ in individuals with and without chronic pain. This study also examines psychological factors that may predict differences in touch perception in individuals with chronic pain. This research will improve our understanding of whether and how massage therapies can benefit pain and health, and whether this differs in people who suffer from chronic pain.

    at UCSD

  • Mindful Action for Pain

    open to all eligible people

    An emerging scientific model that has been applied to chronic pain is the psychological flexibility (PF) model. PF refers to the ability to behave consistently with one's values even in the face of unwanted thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations such as pain. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is the best known treatment derived from the PF model and is as effective as the gold standard Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), but falls short on achieving meaningful changes in functional improvement. Although ACT was designed to impact PF, methods from different treatment approaches are also consistent with the model. An experiential strategy that holds promise for enhancing PF is formal mindfulness meditation, a practice used to train non-judgmental awareness and attention to present-moment experiences, which has never been tested within the PF model. There is compelling theoretical and empirical rationale that the mechanisms underlying formal mindfulness meditation will bolster PF processes and thereby can be applied to facilitate functional improvement. To test this, the principal investigator, has developed a novel 8-week group-based intervention, Mindful Action for Pain (MAP), which integrates formal mindfulness meditation with experiential methods from different evidence-based treatment approaches in accordance with the PF model. MAP is designed such that daily mindfulness meditation practice is used to develop the capacity to more completely utilize strategies to address the key psychosocial barriers (e.g., pain catastrophizing) to optimal functioning. This CDA-2 project consists of two phases. Phase 1 (years 1 - 2) consists of using qualitative and quantitative methods to iteratively develop and refine MAP over the course of 4 MAP cycles (n = 20). Phase 2 (years 3 - 5) consists of a pilot RCT (n = 86) of MAP vs. CBT for chronic pain (CBT-CP) in order to establish feasibility of a future large-scale trial and estimate the preliminary impact of MAP. Functional improvement will be measured by reductions in pain interference (primary clinical outcome). Further, meditation adherence will be assessed to explore dose-response relationships with functional improvement, and objective measures of physical activity (actigraphy) will be captured to explore the psychophysical impact of MAP.

    at UCSD

  • Mindfulness and Chronic Low Back Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The purpose of this study is to see if mindfulness, a form of mental training, or listening to a book alters brain activation in response to raising your leg that may produce the feeling of pain. A technique called functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows scientists to determine which parts of the brain are active during a particular task. This study will provide new information about how mindfulness affects the brain.

    at UCSD

  • Mindfulness Based Pain Reduction

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a development study with clinical outcomes. The investigators aim to develop and test an 8-week MBPR (Mindfulness-Based Pain Reduction) program, which draws on intervention work and clinical experience in the investigative team to optimize a mindfulness-based intervention for individuals with chronic pain. The overall goal of this study is to ensure that the MBPR program has been carefully refined and manualized in an in-person setting before performing clinical trials comparing MBPR to MBSR (Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction) to test whether it improves pain outcomes. This study includes a Pain Attention Task that separates insula activation during experimental heat application between different pain attention conditions.

    at UCSF

  • Opioid Approach Bias Modification

    open to eligible people ages 18-69

    To investigate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying opioid approach bias during a pilot RCT of opioid approach bias modification. The investigators are combining novel ultra-high field MRI technology with the promising treatment of modifying cognitive bias away from detrimental prescription drug use will generate novel neural data and potentially yield a new therapeutic tool to reduce problematic opioid use.

    at UCSF

  • Pain and Opioids: Integrated Treatment In Veterans

    open to eligible people ages 21-75

    This trial will recruit veterans with chronic pain (N = 160) who are prescribed buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD). We seek to: (1) examine the efficacy of an integrated treatment to reduce pain interference and substance misuse (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention [ACT + MBRP]) compared to an education control (EC) consisting of a protocol-based series of education sessions concerning chronic pain, opioids, and buprenorphine use and (2) examine how theoretically-relevant treatment mechanisms of pain acceptance, engagement in values-based action, and opioid craving are related to treatment outcomes. Interventions will be delivered via the VA Video Connect telehealth modality.

    at UCSF

  • Pain Procedures and Anxiolysis Via Distraction With Virtual Reality

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of VR distraction on reducing anxiety patients undergoing interventional pain procedures compared to placebo/active placebo or a non VR option.

    at UC Davis

  • Patient Retrospective Outcomes (PRO)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will evaluate de-identified (anonymous) data in subject medical charts to review the clinical outcomes of various treatment approaches in the treatment of chronic pain.

    at UCSD

  • Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Safety Profile of Understudied Drugs Administered to Children Per Standard of Care (POPS)

    open to eligible people ages up to 20 years

    The study investigators are interested in learning more about how drugs, that are given to children by their health care provider, act in the bodies of children and young adults in hopes to find the most safe and effective dose for children. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the PK of understudied drugs currently being administered to children per SOC as prescribed by their treating provider.

    at UCLA

  • Pragmatic Trial of WHT vs. PC-GE to Promote Non-Pharmacological Strategies to Treat Chronic Pain in Veterans

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The overarching goal of this Pain Management Collaboratory Demonstration project is to test a new Whole Health paradigm for chronic pain care, emphasizing non-pharmacological pain self-management that is hypothesized to reduce pain symptoms and improve overall functioning and quality of life in Veterans. In UH3 Aim 1, the investigators will conduct a 12-month pragmatic effectiveness trial at 5 VA sites across the country to test whether veterans with moderate to severe chronic pain randomized to receive the Whole Health Team (WHT) intervention are more likely than those receiving Primary Care Group Education (PC-GE) to: Hypothesis 1: Experience improved pain interference (primary outcome), pain intensity, functioning and quality of life (secondary outcomes); Hypothesis 2: Decrease use of higher-risk pain medications, including opioids, or high-risk combinations; Hypothesis 3: Engage in a greater number of non-pharmacological pain management activities; and Hypothesis 4: Experience improved mental health-related symptoms, including sleep problems and suicidality. In addition, both the WHT and PC-GE arms will be compared to a third group of veterans randomized to Usual Primary Care (UPC, Control) on the same primary and secondary outcomes above. After the baseline assessment, masked telephone assessments will be administered to participants at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. UH3 Aim 2 is to conduct a process evaluation of the two active interventions (WHT and PC-GE) and a budget impact analysis that includes costs to implement and execute the two active interventions as well as the control condition (UPC) to inform the development of an implementation toolkit for scaling and dissemination. Eligible participants are veterans reporting moderate to severe chronic pain present every day or nearly every day for ≥ 6 months. The total sample size for the population is based on our main study aim/hypothesis and is N=745. This breaks down to n=341 in each of the active interventions (WHT and PC-GE) and N=63 in the Usual Primary Care arm (Control). Results of this UG3/UH3 Pain Management Collaboratory Demonstration project will contribute to the overall mission of the NIH/VA/DoD initiative to build national-level infrastructure that supports non-pharmacologic pain management in veterans and military service personnel.

    at UCSF

  • Predicting Chronic Opioid Use Following Lower Extremity Joint Arthroplasty

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Personalized medicine is a concept in which medical care is individualized to a patient based on their unique characteristics, including comorbidities, demographics, genetics, and microbiome. After major surgery, some patients are at increased risk of opioid dependence. By identifying unique genetic and microbiome markers, clinicians may potentially identify individual risk factors for opioid dependence. By identifying these high risk patients early-on, personalized interventions may be applied to these patients in order to reduce the incidence of opioid-dependence.

    at UCSD

  • Predicting Chronic Pain Following Breast Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Breast surgery, which includes mastectomy, breast reconstructive surgery, or lumpectomies with sentinel node biopsies, may lead to the development of chronic pain and long-term opioid use. In the era of an opioid crisis, it is important to risk-stratify this surgical population for risk of these outcomes in an effort to personalize pain management. The opioid epidemic in the United States resulted in more than 40,000 deaths in 2016, 40% of which involved prescription opioids. Furthermore, it is estimated that 2 million patients become opioid-dependent after elective, outpatient surgery each year. After major breast surgery, chronic pain has been reported to develop anywhere between 35% - 62% of patients, while about 10% use long-term opioids. Precision medicine is a concept at which medical management is tailored to an individual patient based on a specific patient's characteristics, including social, demographic, medical, genetic, and molecular/cellular data. With a plethora of data specific to millions of patients, the use of artificial intelligence (AI) modalities to analyze big data in order to implement precision medicine is crucial. We propose to prospectively collect rich data from patients undergoing various breast surgeries in order to develop predictive models using AI modalities to predict patients at-risk for chronic pain and opioid use.

    at UCSD

  • Prospective Randomized Trial of CPAP for SDB in Patients Who Use Opioids

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Patients with chronic pain who use opioids appear to be at increased risk for breathing issues during sleep, termed sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Treatment of SDB often consists of use of a device during sleep that provides continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via a mask interface. The goal of this study is to determine whether patients with chronic pain who use opioids and have SDB might benefit from the use of CPAP in terms of sleep quality, pain, quality of life, and other measures. In addition, the study will examine whether these individuals are able to adhere to CPAP, which will be important for future studies. Lastly, we anticipate that CPAP won't work for everyone due to the changes that opioids can cause in breathing patterns. We will examine how often CPAP is ineffective, and whether we can predict which individuals are least likely to resolve their SDB with CPAP.

    at UCSD

  • Pudendal Enhancement of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) for Reconstructive Surgery (PEERS)

    open to eligible females ages 18-99

    Patients will undergo their vaginal reconstructive surgery in the usual manner, but will also be randomly assigned on the day of surgery to either receive the extra injection of numbing medication at the onset of surgery or not. The chances they will be assigned to the additional injection is 50%. Their care in the hospital and after surgery will be the same. They will participate in the study for a total of 6 weeks during which time they will be asked to complete two phone surveys, during which a provider will check in on pain level and pain medication use, and one office visit at 6 weeks. The office visit is part of their routine care and would be a scheduled visit regardless if they participated in the study or not. If they are unable to return to the office for a postoperative visit at 6 weeks, they will be contact by phone instead to obtain information on satisfaction with postoperative care, any complications after surgery, and overall how they are doing after surgery.

    at UCLA

  • Regional Blocks for Lateral Condyle Fractures

    open to eligible people ages 4-12

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the post-operative pain control in pediatric patients with closed lateral condyle fractures who undergo open reduction and percutaneous pinning. Patients will be randomized into one of two groups. Group 1 will receive an infraclavicular nerve block to the affected extremity by a fellowship trained pediatric anesthesiologist prior to surgery. Group 2 will undergo the Orthopaedic Institute of Children's (OIC) standard preoperative protocol. Post-operative pain management will be the same for both groups per standard protocol. Pain level will be assessed post-operatively using the Wong-Baker FACES scale and parents will be asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding their satisfaction with the surgery and pain control. Parents will also fill out a medication log until the patient no longer requires pain medication. All patients in both groups will receive standard oxycodone solution prescriptions post-operatively as per typical protocol. The duration of participation in the study is approximately 1 week and requires 2 visits (time of recruitment at surgery and 1st post-op visit). This study is being conducted in hopes of developing comprehensive pain management protocols to reduce opioid consumption after surgical fixations of displaced lateral condyle fractures if the study can show that patients are more satisfied and require less opioid medication when receiving preoperative regional anesthesia.

    at UCLA

  • StimRouter Registry Clinical Protocol

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This Registry study will prospectively evaluate the long-term effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of the StimRouter Neuromodulation System, along with evaluating the technical performance of StimRouter, surgical outcomes, health-related quality of life, concomitant medical use, and subject's impression of improvement.

    at UCSD

  • The Association of Microbiome Patterns With Chronic Opioid Use

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The United States is in the midst of an opioid epidemic, with the number of opioid-related deaths having risen six-fold since 1999. Chronic pain imposes a tremendous economic burden of up to US$635 billion per year in terms of direct costs (such as the costs of treatment) and indirect costs (such as lost productivity and time away from work). We need to better understand individual characteristics that may put patients at risk for chronic opioid use. Recently, the relationship between gut microbiome and diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems has received increasing attention. New evidence suggests that gut microbiota may also play a critical role in many types of chronic pain, including inflammatory pain, neuropathic pain, and opioid tolerance. Many signaling molecules derived from gut microbiota, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns, metabolites, and neurotransmitters, act on receptors that regulate the peripheral and central sensitization, which in turn mediate the development of chronic pain. Gut microbiota-derived mediators serve as critical modulators for the induction of peripheral sensitization, directly or indirectly regulating the excitability of primary nociceptive neurons. Given the strong evidence supporting gut microbiome's involvement in pain pathways, there is a need to develop studies that characterize the differences in gut microbiome between chronic pain patients requiring opioids versus healthy controls. The objective of this proposal is to perform a pilot study measuring the predictive ability of the gut microbiome with chronic opioid use - this will then lay the groundwork to adequately power a larger funded prospective study.

    at UCSD

  • The Effect of Chronic Pain on Delay Discounting in Methadone Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The epidemic of opioid overdose deaths continues to rise, killing more persons in 2017 than HIV/AIDS at the height of that epidemic. Medication assisted treatment, including methadone and buprenorphine, is the standard of care for the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD). However, chronic pain can reduce treatment efficacy during medication assisted treatment and is associated with illicit substance relapse, dropout, and subsequent overdose. Mechanisms by which chronic pain may influence the impulsive decision making (e.g., drug relapse) in persons with OUD have not been well characterized. A better understanding is needed of decision-making in this population. Two factors that can influence decisions to use drugs are impulsivity and acute opioid withdrawal. This proposal will test how chronic pain is associated with increases in impulsive decision making in OUD, whether impulsive decision making is greater when undergoing opioid withdrawal, and how catastrophizing may modify the association between withdrawal and impulsive decision making in patients with chronic pain and OUD. An ideal population for this developmental research project are methadone maintained patients, who show high treatment attendance rates and will therefore assure study efficiency and reliable completion.

    at UCSF

  • The Use of Venlafaxine in Reducing Pain in Primary Total Knee Replacement

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    Patients experience pain after their knee replacement surgery - and some may continue to experience persistent pain long after their knee replacement surgery. Traditional pain management strategies reply on pain medication such as opioids for pain control. However, these drugs do not work well for pain associated with movement or the the nerve pain (tingling, electrical sensations) after surgery. In addition, opioids are associated with significant side effects such as nausea, vomiting, respiratory depression, depression, cognitive dysfunction and risk of persistent opioid use. Neuropathic pain medications, such as venlafaxine are effective in managing nerve pain. Recent studies also support its potential role in acute pain management. Here, we propose a prospective randomized clinical trial 1) to evaluate the efficacy of Venlafaxine in reducing pain intensity and opioid consumption at post-operative day 1 (POD1) and 1- week after surgery, and 2) to examine whether the use of Venlafaxine will reduce the incidents of chronic postsurgical pain in TKA patients at 3-month time point.

    at UCSF

  • Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation for Chronic Low Back Pain

    open to eligible people ages 21-85

    As a leading cause of disability worldwide, chronic low back pain (cLBP) represents a significant medical and socioeconomic problem with estimated health care spending of $87 billion/annually. The efficacy of dorsal column electrical stimulation to inhibit pain was first described over 50 years ago. Since then, several large clinical trials have investigated the therapeutic potential of electrical spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and found that over 70% of patients with intractable pain had over 50% pain relief after 1 year of treatment. Thus, SCS is a promising therapeutic intervention that has superior patient outcomes when compared to traditional modalities for the treatment of cLBP. To date, SCS for treatment of cLBP has been delivered via epidural electrodes, requiring neurosurgical implantation. Although, the implantable stimulators have a low rate of adverse events, secondary complications associated with surgical intervention still occur.Transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) is a rapidly developing non invasive neuromodulation technique in the field of spinal cord injury. Its application potentiates lumbosacral spinal cord excitability enabling motor functions, (e.g. independent standing, postural control) in patients with chronic complete motor paralysis. Given that epidural and transcutaneous SCS activate similar neuronal networks, tSCS for cLBP treatment may be advantageous due to its non-invasive nature which may also allow for a mass market production and rapid patient availability if tSCS is proven efficacious. In this pilot study we will establish the feasibility of tSCS to acutely improve patient reported outcomes (pain scores) and several objective measures, including sit-to-stand biomechanics, neurophysiological and neuroimaging outcomes.

    at UCSF

  • Transvaginal Electrical Stimulation for Myofascial Pelvic Pain

    open to eligible females ages 18-65

    Myofascial Pelvic Pain (MPP) is a frequently overlooked musculoskeletal cause of chronic pelvic pain affecting 10-20% of all adult women. Despite high prevalence and societal costs, few effective treatments exist and are difficult to access due to shortages of skilled personnel. Treatments for MPP using electrical stimulation to induce muscle fatigue have proven efficacy at reducing pain, improving circulation, and promoting tissue healing, but have proven difficult to implement in gynecologic practice. The aim of this three-arm randomized study is to evaluate the utility of transvaginal electrical stimulation at a fixed frequency of 200 Hz in women with symptomatic MPP in comparison to the standard, first-line treatment with education, stretching, and low-impact exercise. Nursing staff without prior training will be taught to deliver this high-frequency transvaginal electrical stimulation (HF-TES) treatment using the device. Responses to treatment provided by a specialist physician and licensed vocational nurse will be compared. Patients with >50% pain improvement will determine the effectiveness of HF-TES. Responses to treatment provided by a specialist physician and licensed vocational nurse will also be compared. Participants will be followed for 3 months following treatment completion.

    at UCLA

  • Acupuncture in the Emergency Department for Pain Management

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Our goal is to use the U01 mechanism to conduct a two-arm multisite, feasibility RCT (Acupuncture vs Usual Care) to refine procedures for conducting a future fully powered multi-site RCT. The effort will be led by the BraveNet Coordinating Center at Einstein and include 3 BraveNet PBRN sites University Hospitals/ Case Western Reserve University (UH/Case), Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), and University of California-San Diego (UCSD). During Year 1 (Aim 1), we will develop the manualized acupuncture intervention with consensus from experts in the delivery of acupuncture for acute pain. At the end of Year 1 (prior to the start of the RCT), a study investigator meeting will be held to ensure consistent training of all study coordinators and acupuncturists to the study data collection, human subjects, intervention delivery, and reporting requirements. In Year 2-3 (Aim 2), we will enroll 165 participants (55 per site) into the randomized trial (1:1 assignment to Acupuncture or Usual Care) over a ~9-month enrollment period for each site. Sites will participate in the study sequentially, thus general findings from the implementation evaluation may be used to improve implementation at subsequent sites. Treatment outcomes include pain intensity, state anxiety and pain medication utilization within the ED (via EHR data extraction). In Aim 2a, 75 structured qualitative interviews of ED providers, staff, study acupuncturists (~10 per site) and acupuncture patients (~15 per site) and direct observation at each site will be used to identify barriers and facilitators of successful implementation. The Implementation Evaluation includes two broad categories of data: implementation outcomes (collected in Aim 2 as the feasibility study is conducted at each site) and explanatory factors (Aim 2a).

    at UCSD

  • Acute Pain Management in Patients on Opioid Replacement Therapy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an outpatient randomized within subject placebo-controlled human laboratory investigation of analgesia (as assessed with quantitative sensory testing; QST) from ketamine alone and in combination with hydromorphone in buprenorphine maintained participants. The goals of this project are to characterize the analgesic, subjective, and physiologic effects of ketamine combined with hydromorphone in patients on buprenorphine maintenance for opioid use disorder.

    at UCSF

  • An Innovative Tailored Intervention for Improving Children's Postoperative Recovery (WebTIPS)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The goal of this randomized trial is to examine the effectiveness of a tailored Internet-based Preparation Program (WebTIPS) in reducing anxiety and improving the recovery process in children undergoing surgery. Two hospitals and all parent-child dyads and healthcare providers (HCPs) will be randomized to either a Web-based Tailored Intervention Preparation for Surgery (WebTIPS) Group or to a Web-based Information (WebINFO) Group, the attention control group. The WebTIPS group will receive the newly developed intervention with short message service (SMS) two-way communication between an HCP and patient, while the WebINFO Group will only receive an internet and mobile platform with information on the management of preoperative anxiety and perioperative pain. The aims of this study are to: Primary aim: Quality of Clinical Care: Determine whether and to what extent WebTIPS is more effective than an attention control intervention in reducing preoperative anxiety among children ages 1-12 years old undergoing anesthesia and outpatient surgery. Secondary aims: Quality of Clinical Care: 1. Examine the impact of WebTIPS on Post-Anesthesia care unit based postoperative clinical recovery parameters, such as pain and emergence delirium. 2. Examine the impact of WebTIPS on home-based postoperative clinical recovery parameters such as pain, new onset behavioral changes and return to normal daily activity over 2 weeks. 3. Determine if the use of WebTIPS reduces parental preoperative anxiety. Experience of Care: Examine the effects of WebTIPS on parental satisfaction with the overall experience of the surgical episode. Cost of Care/Resource Use: Determine if WebTIPS modifies healthcare resource use, as measured by 30-day charges adjusted for Medicaid cost-to-charge ratios.

    at UC Irvine

  • AnalgeSiC and appEtite-stimulating Effects of caNnabigerol and THC (ASCENT)

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study will assess the analgesic, appetite-stimulating, and subjective effects of cannabigerol (CBG) alone and in combination with THC.

    at UCLA

  • Anesthetics and Analgesics in Children

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety profile of anesthetics and analgesics in children and adolescents.

    at UCSF

  • Brain Mechanisms Supporting Cannabis-induced Pain Relief

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The American Academy of Pain Medicine has labeled pain as a "silent epidemic" due to its staggering costs to society (over $500 billion/year) and widespread prevalence (affects over 100 million Americans)(Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on Advancing Pain Research, 2011; Summers B, 2005). Thus, it is imperative to test and validate cost-effective pain therapies. To this extent, cannabis is characterized as one of the most promising therapies to treat a wide spectrum of pain conditions (Andreae et al., 2015; Baker, Pryce, Giovannoni, & Thompson, 2003; Bostwick, 2014; Haroutounian et al., 2016; Shohet, Khlebtovsky, Roizen, Roditi, & Djaldetti, 2017). However, the clinical applicability of cannabis-based pain therapies has been limited due to lacking mechanistic characterization in human-focused studies. Of critical importance, the neural mechanisms supporting cannabis induced pain relief remain unknown. The primary objective of the proposed pilot study is to identify the brain mechanisms supporting the direct alleviation of acutely evoked pain through vaporized cannabis.

    at UCSD

  • Can Exposure to Inclusive Virtual Art Decrease Pain and Social Disconnection Among Individuals Living With Chronic Pain?

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    The proposed study is an experimental intervention to test for the effects of exposure to art by means of a virtual museum visit. It examines the fundamental question of whether exposure to virtual art can alleviate pain. Google Arts & Culture has digitized the collections of over 2,000 museums, art galleries, and other cultural institutions. The platform is free and allows 'visitors' to explore art from around the world. For this study, the PIs have chosen artwork from this collection and created a virtual museum gallery such that research participants will visit the museum with or without art (i.e., we will remove all art from the virtual galleries). In addition, we hypothesize that individuals primed to experience social connection prior to art exposure will experience lower perceived social disconnection and pain than those who are not primed.

    at UC Davis

  • Closed-loop Deep Brain Stimulation to Treat Refractory Neuropathic Pain

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) holds promise as a new option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant chronic pain, but current technology is unable to reliably achieve long-term pain symptom relief. A "one-size-fits-all" approach of continuous, 24/7 brain stimulation has helped patients with some movement disorders, but the key to reducing pain may be the activation of stimulation only when needed, as this may help keep the brain from adapting to stimulation effects. By expanding the technological capabilities of an investigative brain stimulation device, the investigators will enable the delivery of stimulation only when pain signals in the brain are high, and then test whether this more personalized stimulation leads to reliable symptom relief for chronic pain patients over extended periods of time.

    at UCSF

  • Cryoanalgesia to Prevent Acute and Chronic Pain Following Surgery: A Randomized, Double-Masked, Sham-Controlled Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The ultimate objective of the proposed line of research is to determine if cryoanalgesia is an effective adjunctive treatment for pain in the period immediately following various painful surgical procedures; and, if this analgesic modality decreases the risk of persistent postoperative pain, or "chronic" pain. The objective of the proposed pilot study is to optimize the protocol and collect data to power subsequent, definitive clinical trials. Specific Aim 1: To determine if, compared with current and customary analgesia, the addition of cryoanalgesia decreases the incidence and severity of post-surgical pain. Hypothesis 1a (primary): The severity of surgically-related pain will be significantly decreased on postoperative day 2 with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 1b: The incidence of chronic pain will be significantly decreased one year following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 1c: The severity of chronic pain will be significantly decreased one year following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Specific Aim 2: To determine if, compared with current and customary analgesia, the addition of cryoanalgesia improves postoperative functioning. Hypothesis 2a: Following primary unilateral knee and shoulder arthroplasty as well as rotator cuff repair, joint range of motion will be significantly increased within the year following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 2b: Following video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, inspiratory spirometry will be improved within the month following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment.

    at UCSD

  • EPPIC: Easing Pelvic Pain Interventions Clinical Research Program

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    The EPPIC (Easing Pelvic Pain Interventions Clinical Research Program) study evaluates an ultra-brief, 4 session cognitive behavioral pain treatment transdiagnostic in design for urologic chronic pain syndrome (UCPPS) with clinical and practical advantages over existing behavioral therapies whose length and focus limits their adoption by clinicians and coverage for mechanistically similar comorbidities. A theoretically informed, practical, empirically grounded approach will systematically unpack CBT's working mechanisms, clarify for whom it works, ease dissemination, appeal to patients, providers, payers, and policy makers in the COVID-19 era favoring low resource intensity treatments, and reduce cost and inefficiencies associated with high intensity therapies whose complexity, length, and scarcity restricts uptake and impact.

    at UCLA

  • Gabapentin and Tizanidine for Insomnia in Chronic Pain

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover trial aimed at assessing the effect of gabapentin and tizanidine, two pain medications, on insomnia in chronic pain patients.

    at UCSD

  • INTRACEPT: Prospective, Randomized, Multi-center Study Intraosseous Basivertebral Nerve Ablation for Treatment of CLBP

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Prospective, open-label, 1:1 randomized controlled trial of Basivertebral nerve (BVN) Ablation arm vs Standard Care Control for the treatment of vertebrogenic chronic low back pain (CLBP). Participants in the the BVN Ablation arm will receive radiofrequency ablation of the BVN using the Intracept procedure for treatment of up to 4 vertebral bodies (L3 to S1). Participants in the Standard Care Control arm will continue on non-surgical standard care and will be offered optional crossover after 12 months of follow-up with follow-up of 6 months post crossover treatment. The study had a pre-specified Interim Analysis with stopping rules for superiority when approximately 60% of the randomized participants have completed their 3-month primary endpoint study visit. An independent Data Safety Management Board (DSMB) reviewed the interim analysis results and recommended stopping enrollments for superiority and offering early crossover to the control arm participants.

    at UC Davis

  • Optimal Management of Pain in Hospitalized Patients - Opioid Tolerant Populations.

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Pain is a symptom that drives hospital admissions, and pain management is required by most patients during their hospital stay. Further, the use of medications such as opioids can lead to upward-spiraling doses, especially among chronic pain patients whose resource utilization rates are high. Many initiatives aim to reduce the costs of these "high-resource utilizing" patients. One exciting aspect of improving the management of pain is that this may help prevent patients from ever becoming high-cost in the first place. The purpose of this study is to examine the impacts of an early and sustained intervention pathway, in comparison to the current standard of care, for the treatment of pain in opioid tolerant patients. It is hypothesized that patients randomized to the intervention pathway, in comparison to the control, will lead to decreased costs of care, a reduction in opioid usage within 3 and 6 months, and decrease in hospital readmission rates.

    at UC Irvine

  • Pain and Major Depressive Disorder

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    This study will examine the effects of brain stimulation on pain symptoms associated with Major depressive disorder. This study will enroll 69 Subjects. Study subjects will be asked to complete surveys about their mood and well-being, 2 blood draws, 2 MRIs, 3 electroencephalograms, and receive 30 treatments of blinded transcranial magnetic stimulation. There is no control group as all subjects will receive some form of active treatment. Subjects are required to participate in 30-33 study visits and volunteer 40 hours of their time. Compensation for this study is $150 for completing all study activities.

    at UCLA

  • Program to Overcome Pelvic Pain Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    To refine and evaluate the feasibility of procedures for a future full-scale efficacy trial of a group-based therapeutic yoga intervention versus physical conditioning (stretching and strengthening) intervention for women with chronic pelvic pain.

    at UCSF

  • Psilocybin Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain

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    This study evaluates whether psilocybin therapy helps patients cope with chronic low back pain more effectively. Patients may be recruited at Stanford and University of California San Francisco (UCSF), study procedures will occur at UCSF. Each participant will receive a dose of psilocybin with possibly one or more other drugs. Participants will undergo two preparation sessions, a dosing session, three integration sessions to discuss their psilocybin experience, and several follow up sessions.

    at UCSF

  • ReActiv8 Implantable Neurostimulation System for Chronic Low Back Pain

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this trial is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ReActiv8 for the treatment of adults with Chronic Low Back Pain when used in conjunction with medical management.

    at UCSD

  • TARGET Post-Approval Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this prospective, multicenter, single arm post-approval study is to demonstrate continued safety of the Axium and Proclaim Neurostimulator System for dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulation. The primary endpoint is the 12-month serious adverse event rate for permanent implants.

    at UCSF

  • The BEST Trial: Biomarkers for Evaluating Spine Treatments

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    The BEST Trial (Biomarkers for Evaluating Spine Treatments) is a NIAMS-sponsored clinical trial being conducted through the NIH HEAL Initiative's Back Pain Consortium (BACPAC) Research Program. The primary objective of this trial is to inform a precision medicine approach to the treatment of Chronic Low-Back Pain by estimating an algorithm for optimally assigning treatments based on an individual's phenotypic markers and response to treatment. Interventions being evaluated in this trial are: (1) enhanced self-care (ESC), (2) acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), (3) evidence-based exercise and manual therapy (EBEM), and (4) duloxetine.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Trans-MAPP II Study of Urologic Chronic Pelvin Pain

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network has been established by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to focus on a broader approach to the study of Interstitial Cystitis (IC)/ Bladder Pain Syndrome (BPS) in men and women, and Chronic Prostatitis (CP)/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS) in men, than previously undertaken. Patients with IC or CP are being recruited for a new study called the "Trans-MAPP Study of Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain: Symptom Patterns Study (SPS). This research study will recruit Control Participants to better understand the symptoms of individuals with some form of IC or CP. As with many chronic pain disorders, IC and CP are poorly understood, and treatment is often not helpful. The goal of this study is to better understand how pain is felt in people with IC or CP and the investigators hope that this study will lead to improvement in the treatment of IC and CP.

    at UCLA

  • Valacyclovir in Pain Management of Acute Apical Abscesses

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    The Virus in Endodontics (VE) phase I pilot study for preoperative pain will be analyzed and adjusted for the Phase II clinical trial. The Phase II clinical trial on preoperative pain, postoperative pain, and clinical healing will involve 250 patients. Patients will be recruited from the same pool of participants as the Phase II clinical trial. Preoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans will be taken as well as three and six month postoperative CBCT scans. The secondary outcomes form the Phase II randomized clinical trial will be clinical success and visible radiographic healing determined by CBCT images.

    at UCSF

Our lead scientists for Pain research studies include .

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