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Myelodysplastic Syndrome clinical trials at University of California Health

42 in progress, 14 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Phase 2 Study of CPI-0610 With and Without Ruxolitinib in Patients With Myelofibrosis

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Phase 1 Part (Complete): Open-label, sequential dose escalation study of CPI-0610 in patients with previously treated Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms, and Myelofibrosis. Phase 2 Part: Open-label study of CPI-0610 with and without Ruxolitinib in patients with Myelofibrosis. CPI-0610 is a small molecule inhibitor of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of CFI-400945 With or Without Azacitidine or Decitabine in Patients With AML, MDS or CMML

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to test the safety of an investigational drug called CFI-400945 alone and in combination with azacitidine or decitabine

    at UC Davis

  • A Study of Engineered Donor Grafts (TregGraft) for Allogeneic Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies (blood cancer)

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of an engineered donor graft ("TregGraft"/"Orca-T", a T-cell-Depleted Graft With Additional Infusion of Conventional T Cells and Regulatory T Cells) in participants undergoing myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

    at UC Davis UCLA

  • A Study of Experimental FT-2102 in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome (types of blood system cancer)

    “This study will evaluate the safety, efficacy, PK, and PD of FT-2102 as a single agent or in combination with azacitidine or cytarabine.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This Phase 1/2 study will evaluate the safety, efficacy, PK, and PD of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) as a single agent or in combination with azacitidine or cytarabine. The Phase 1 stage of the study is split into 2 distinct parts: a dose escalation part, which will utilize an open-label design of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) (single agent) and FT-2102 (olutasidenib) + azacitidine (combination agent) administered via one or more intermittent dosing schedules followed by a dose expansion part. The dose expansion part will enroll patients in up to 5 expansion cohorts, exploring single-agent FT-2102 (olutasidenib) activity as well as combination activity with azacitidine or cytarabine. Following the completion of the relevant Phase 1 cohorts, Phase 2 will begin enrollment. Patients will be enrolled across 8 different cohorts, examining the effect of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) (as a single agent) and FT-2102 (olutasidenib) + azacitidine (combination) on various AML/MDS disease states.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSD

  • A Study of Magrolimab + Azacitidine Versus Azacitidine + Placebo in Untreated Participants With Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of magrolimab in combination with azacitidine compared to that of azacitidine plus placebo in previously untreated participants with intermediate/high/very high risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) by Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) as measured by complete remission (CR) and overall survival (OS).

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA UCSD

  • A Study of Oral LY3410738 in Advanced Hematologic Malignancies With IDH1 or IDH2 Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, multi-center Phase 1 study of LY3410738, an oral, covalent IDH inhibitor, in patients with IDH1 and/or IDH2-mutant advanced hematologic malignancies who have received standard therapy

    at UC Davis

  • A Study of Response-Based Chemotherapy in Leukemia & Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients with Down Syndrome

    open to eligible people ages up to 3 years

    This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • A Study to Evaluate Long-term Safety in Subjects Who Have Participated in Other Luspatercept (ACE-536) Clinical Trials

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 3b, open-label, single-arm, rollover study to evaluate the long-term safety of luspatercept, to the following subjects: - Subjects receiving luspatercept on a parent protocol at the time of their transition to the rollover study, who tolerate the protocol-prescribed regimen in the parent trial and, in the opinion of the investigator, may derive clinical benefit in the opinion of the investigator from continuing treatment with luspatercept. - Placebo arm subjects from parent protocol (at the time of unblinding or in follow-up) crossing over to luspatercept treatment (provided subjects have met all requirements for entering the rollover study as per the parent protocol). - Subjects in the follow-up phase previously treated with luspatercept or placebo in the parent protocol will continue into long-term post-treatment follow-up in the rollover study until the follow-up commitments are met (unless they meet requirements as per parent protocol to cross-over to luspatercept treatment). The study design is divided into the Transition Phase, Treatment Phase and Follow-up Phase. Subjects will enter transition phase and depending on their background will enter either the treatment phase or the Long-term Post-treatment Follow-up (LTPTFU) phase. - Transition Phase (Screening): up to 21 days prior to enrollment - Treatment Phase: For subjects in luspatercept treatment the dose and schedule of luspatercept in this study will be the same as the last dose and schedule in the parent luspatercept study. For placebo arm subjects from parent protocol (at the time of unblinding or in follow-up) crossing over to luspatercept treatment (provided subjects have met all requirements for entering the rollover study as per the parent protocol) will start at a luspatercept dose of 1.0 mg/kg every 3 weeks (Q3W). This does not apply to subjects that are in long-term follow-up from the parent protocol. - Follow-up Phase: - 42 Day Safety Follow-up Phase: subjects will be followed for 42 days after the last dose of luspatercept, for the assessment of safety-related parameters and adverse event (AE) reporting. - Long-term Post-treatment Follow-up (LTPTFU) Phase: All subjects who are continuing in the LTPTFU Phase, will continue to be followed for 5 years from Dose 1 of the parent protocol, or 3 years of post-treatment from last dose of the parent protocol, whichever occurs later. Subjects will be followed every 6 months until death, withdrawal of consent, study termination, or until a subject is lost to follow-up. Subjects will also be monitored for progression to AML or any malignancies/pre- malignancies. New anticancer or disease related therapies should be collected at the same time schedule. Subjects transitioning from a parent luspatercept study in post-treatment follow-up (safety or LTPTFU) will continue from the same equivalent point in this rollover study. The rollover study will be terminated, and relevant subjects will discontinue from the study when all subjects fulfill 5 years from Dose 1 of the parent protocol, or 3 years of post-treatment from last dose of the parent protocol, whichever occurs later. The shift to commercial drug is an alternative way to stop the study.

    at UCSF

  • BLAST MRD AML-1: BLockade of PD-1 Added to Standard Therapy to Target Measurable Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia 1- A Randomized Phase 2 Study of Anti-PD-1 Pembrolizumab in Combination With Intensive Chemotherapy as Frontline Therapy in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This phase II trial studies how well cytarabine and idarubicin or daunorubicin with or without pembrolizumab work in treating patients with newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cytarabine, idarubicin, and daunorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving induction chemotherapy with pembrolizumab may work better than induction chemotherapy alone in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    at UC Irvine

  • Clinical Transplant-Related Long-term Outcomes of Alternative Donor Allogeneic Transplantation

    open to all eligible people

    The purpose of this study is to determine if a search strategy of searching for an HLA-matched unrelated donor for allogeneic transplantation if possible then an alternative donor if an HLA-matched unrelated donor is not available versus proceeding directly to an alternative donor transplant will result in better survival for allogeneic transplant recipients within 2 years after study enrollment.

    at UCSD

  • Connect® Myeloid Disease Registry

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of the Connect® Myeloid disease registry is to provide unique insights into treatment decisions and treatment patterns as they relate to clinical outcomes of patients with myeloid diseases in routine clinical practice. This disease registry will also evaluate molecular and cellular markers that may provide further prognostic classification which may or may not be predictive of therapy and clinical outcomes.

    at UCSD

  • Study Of Venetoclax Tablet With Intravenous or Subcutaneous Azacitidine to Assess Change in Disease Activity In Adult Participants With Newly Diagnosed Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) is a group of disorders that gradually affect the ability of a person's bone marrow (semi-liquid tissue present in many bones like backbones) to produce normal blood cells. Some people with MDS have a risk of the disease progressing to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and a risk of death from the disease itself. Symptoms of MDS include fatigue, shortness of breath, unusual paleness due to anemia (low red blood cell count), easy or unusual bruising, and red spots just beneath the skin caused by bleeding. The purpose of this study is to see how safe and effective venetoclax and azacitidine (AZA) combination are when compared to AZA and a placebo (contains no medicine), in participants with newly diagnosed higher-risk MDS. Venetoclax is an investigational drug being developed for the treatment of MDS. The study consists of two treatment arms - In one arm, participants will receive venetoclax and AZA. In another arm, participants will receive AZA and placebo. Adult participants with newly diagnosed higher-risk MDS will be enrolled. Around 500 participants will be enrolled in approximately 220 sites worldwide. Participants in one arm will receive oral doses of venetoclax tablet and intravenous (infusion in the vein) or subcutaneous (given under the skin) AZA solution. Participants in another arm will receive oral doses of placebo tablet and intravenous or subcutaneous AZA solution. There may be higher treatment burden for participants in this trial compared to their standard of care. Participants will attend regular visits during the course of the study at a hospital or clinic. The effect of the treatment will be checked by medical assessments, blood and bone marrow tests, checking for side effects, and completing questionnaires.

    at UCLA

  • Study to Evaluate Imetelstat (GRN163L) in Subjects With International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) Low or Intermediate-1 Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of imetelstat in transfusion dependent participants with low or intermediate-1 risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) that is relapsed/refractory to erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) treatment.

    at UCLA

  • Using the Anticancer Drug Olaparib to Treat Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome With an Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well olaparib works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory), or myelodysplastic syndrome. Patients must also have a change in the gene called the IDH gene (IDH mutation). Olaparib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. This study is being done to see if olaparib is better or worse in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome compared to the standard chemotherapy drugs.

    at UC Irvine

  • A Combination Study of PF-04449913 (Glasdegib) and Azacitidine In Untreated MDS, AML and CMML Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This multi center open label Phase 1b study is designed to evaluate the safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of glasdegib (PF-04449913) when combined with azacitidine in patients with previously untreated Higher Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS), Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML). This clinical study includes two components: (a) a safety lead in cohort (LIC) and (b) an expansion phase with an AML cohort and an MDS cohort.

    at UCSD

  • A Study of Experimental Treatment with OrcaGraft for Allogeneic (donor) Transplant in Hematologic Malignancies (blood cancers)

    Sorry, not accepting new patients

    This study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of engineered donor grafts ("OrcaGraft"/"Orca-Q") in participants undergoing myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

    at UC Davis

  • A Study of ONO-7475 in Patients With Acute Leukemias

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    [Updated]: To assess the safety and tolerability of ONO-7475 monotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia or relapsed or refractory myelodysplastic syndromes and to assess: i) safety and tolerability and ii) preliminary efficacy of the combination of ONO-7475 and venetoclax in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

    at UCLA

  • An Efficacy and Safety Study of Pevonedistat Plus Azacitidine Versus Single-Agent Azacitidine in Participants With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (HR MDS), Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) and Low-Blast Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pevonedistat plus azacitidine versus single-agent azacitidine in participants with HR-MDS or CMML, or low-blast AML.

    at UCSD

  • Azacitidine With or Without Nivolumab or Midostaurin, or Decitabine and Cytarabine Alone in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone work in treating older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, decitabine, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Midostaurin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone may kill more cancer cells.

    at UC Davis

  • Collecting and Storing Blood, Bone Marrow, and Other Samples From Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    As one of the nation's largest cooperative cancer treatment groups, the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (Alliance) is in a unique position to organize a Leukemia Tissue Bank. The member institutions diagnose hundreds of patients with leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome each year, and uniformly treat these patients with chemotherapy regimens. The Alliance offers centralized data management for the clinical history, the classification of the leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, cytogenetics, flow cytometric analysis, treatment and follow-up. The highly skilled health care providers at each member institution are familiar with obtaining informed consent, completing data questionnaires and shipping specimens. There currently exists a central processing facility where samples are prepared for a variety of cellular and molecular studies. Hence, the patient resources, the health care providers, and a processing facility for a Leukemia Tissue Bank are all in place. What is needed, however, and is addressed in the current protocol, is a formal mechanism to procure bone marrow, blood and normal tissue from patients with hematologic malignancies who are to be enrolled on Alliance (Cancer and Leukemia Group B [CALGB]) treatment studies.

    at UCSF

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial is studying how well combination chemotherapy works in treating young patients with Down syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells.

    at UCSF

  • Controlled Study of Rigosertib Versus Physician's Choice of Treatment in MDS Patients After Failure of an HMA

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The study's primary objective [in a population of patients with MDS after failure of treatment with azacitidine (AZA) or decitabine (DAC)], is to compare the overall survival (OS) of patients in the rigosertib group vs the Physician's Choice group, in all patients and in a subgroup of patients with IPSS-R very high risk.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Cord Blood Transplant With OTS for the Treatment of HIV Positive Hematologic Cancers

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of a cord blood transplant using OTS and to see how well it works in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive hematologic (blood) cancers. After a cord blood transplant, the immune cells, including white blood cells, can take a while to recover, putting the patient at increased risk of infection. OTS consists of blood stem cells that help to produce mature blood cells, including immune cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Total body irradiation is a type of whole-body radiation. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a cord blood transplant with OTS may help to kill any cancer cells that are in the body and make room in the patient's bone marrow for new stem cells to grow and reduce the risk of infection.

    at UCSF

  • Cytogenetic Studies in Acute Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Chromosomal analysis or the study of genetic differences in patients previously untreated with AML, ALL, MDS or MM may be helpful in the diagnosis and classification of disease. It may also improve the ability to predict the course of disease and the selection of therapy. Institutions must have either an Alliance-approved cytogeneticist or an agreement from an Alliance-approved main member cytogenetics laboratory to enroll a patient on CALGB 8461. The Alliance Approved Institutional Cytogeneticists list is posted on the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology website.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant With or Without G-CSF in Treating Young Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Other Diseases

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial is studying donor bone marrow transplant with or without G-CSF to compare how well they work in treating young patients with hematologic cancer or other diseases. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer or abnormal cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving methotrexate and tacrolimus or cyclosporine before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known whether donor bone marrow transplant is more effective with or without G-CSF in treating hematologic cancer or other diseases.

    at UCSF

  • Ibrutinib and Azacitidine for Treatment of Higher Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of ibrutinib when given together with azacitidine in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome that is likely to occur or spread (higher risk) and who were previously treated or untreated and unfit for or refused intense therapy. Ibrutinib and azacitidine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Ibrutinib and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ibrutinib when giving together with lenalidomide in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ibrutinib and lenalidomide may work better in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    at UC Davis

  • Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ipilimumab when given together with decitabine in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ipilimumab and decitabine may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia.

    at UC Davis UCSD

  • KIR Favorable Mismatched Haplo Transplant and KIR Polymorphism in ALL/AML/MDS Allo-HCT Children

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a phase II, open-label, non-randomized, prospective study of haploidentical transplantation using KIR-favorable donors for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The relationship of KIR2DL1 polymorphisms to survival in children with these diseases undergoing any approach to allogeneic HCT during the study time frame will also be determined.

    at UCSF

  • Lenalidomide With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Anemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies lenalidomide to see how well it works with or without epoetin alfa in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and anemia. Lenalidomide may stop the growth of myelodysplastic syndrome by blocking blood flow to the cells. Colony stimulating factors, such as epoetin alfa, may increase the number of immune cells found in bone marrow or peripheral blood. It is not yet known whether lenalidomide is more effective with or without epoetin alfa in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and anemia.

    at UC Davis

  • Personalized Adoptive Cellular Therapy Targeting MDS Stem Cell Neoantigens (PACTN)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will evaluate the safety of autologous T cells that have been immunized ex vivo with patient-specific MDS stem cell neoantigens in patients with MDS.

    at UCSD

  • Pevonedistat Plus Azacitidine Versus Single-Agent Azacitidine as First-Line Treatment for Participants With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (HR MDS), Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML), or Low-Blast Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the combination of pevonedistat and azacitidine improves event-free survival (EFS) when compared with single-agent azacitidine. (An event is defined as death or transformation to AML in participants with MDS or CMML, whichever occurs first, and is defined as death in participants with low-blast AML).

    at UCSD

  • Pevonedistat, Azacitidine, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well pevonedistat, azacitidine, fludarabine phosphate, and cytarabine work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Pevonedistat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as azacitidine, fludarabine phosphate, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and pevonedistat may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    at UCSF

  • Safety and Efficacy of ATIR101 as Adjunctive Treatment to Blood Stem Cell Transplantation From a Haploidentical Family Donor Compared to Post-transplant Cyclophosphamide in Patients With Blood Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective of this study is to compare safety and efficacy of a haploidentical T-cell depleted HSCT and adjunctive treatment with ATIR101 versus a haploidentical T cell replete HSCT with post-transplant administration of high dose cyclophosphamide (PTCy) in patients with a hematologic malignancy. An additional objective of the study is to compare the effect of the two treatments on quality of life.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Safety Study of AG-120 or AG-221 in Combination With Induction and Consolidation Therapy in Participants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) With an IDH1 and/or IDH2 Mutation

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this Phase I, multicenter, clinical trial is to evaluate the safety of AG-120 and AG-221 when given in combination with standard AML induction and consolidation therapy. The study plans to evaluate up to 2 dose levels of AG-120 in participants with an isocitrate dehydrogenase protein 1 (IDH1) mutation and up to 2 dose levels of AG-221 in participants with an isocitrate dehydrogenase protein 2 (IDH2) mutation. AG-120 or AG-221 will be administered with 2 types of AML induction therapies (cytarabine with either daunorubicin or idarubicin) and 2 types of AML consolidation therapies (mitoxantrone with etoposide [ME] or cytarabine). After consolidation therapy, participants may continue on to maintenance therapy and receive daily treatment with single-agent AG-120 or AG-221 until relapse, development of an unacceptable toxicity, or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). The study will end when all participants have discontinued study treatment.

    at UCLA

  • Stem Cell Transplantation With NiCord® (Omidubicel) vs Standard Umbilical Cord Blood in Patients With Leukemia, Lymphoma, and Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is an open-label, controlled, multicenter, international, Phase III, randomized study of transplantation of NiCord® versus transplantation of one or two unmanipulated, unrelated cord blood units in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia or lymphoma, all with required disease features rendering them eligible for allogeneic transplantation.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Study of APVO436 in Patients With AML or MDS

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective of the Phase 1 part of the study is to determine the recommended dose of APVO436 administered intravenously to patients with AML or MDS. The primary objective of the Phase 1b part of the study is to evaluate the clinical activity of APVO436 in patients with AML or MDS. APVO436 is being studied in this Phase 1b, open-label, multi-center, two-part dose-escalation/dose expansion study to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD), and clinical activity of APVO436 in patients with AML and MDS. The study will be conducted in 2 parts. The first part of this Phase 1B study is an open-label, multiple dose ascending dose escalation phase to determine the recommended dose (RP2D) level of APVO436 for future Phase 2 studies. The goal of the dose expansion phase of the study (Part 2) is to (i) evaluate the safety and tolerability of APVO436 at the RP2D level when it is used as an adjunct to the standard of care and (ii) obtain a preliminary assessment of the anti-leukemia activity of APVO436-containing experimental monotherapy and combination therapy modalities. Study Objectives for Dose Escalation Phase - Primary Objectives are to: 1. Determine the RP2D level of APVO436 administered intravenously (IV) in patients with AML or MDS, and 2. Evaluate the safety and tolerability of APVO436 at the RP2D level when it is used as an adjunct to the standard of care and obtain a preliminary assessment of the anti-leukemia activity of APVO436-containing experimental monotherapy and combination therapy modalities. - Secondary Objectives are to: 1. Define the safety profile and immunogenicity of APVO436; to determine the PK/PD of APVO436; to evaluate the clinical activity of APVO436 in AML and MDS patients. 2. Further evaluate the safety profile and immunogenicity of APVO436 and the PK/PD of APVO436 and the relationship between PK/PD and clinical response. Study Objectives for Dose Expansion Phase - Primary Objective is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of APVO436 at the RP2D level when it is used as an adjunct to the standard of care. - Secondary Objective is to obtain a preliminary assessment of the anti-leukemia activity of APVO436-containing experimental monotherapy and combination therapy modalities.

    at UCSF

  • Study of Lenalidomide in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether lenalidomide can stop the growth of leukemia stem cells and can be used to prevent the return of leukemia cells after a transplant.

    at UC Davis

  • Study of ProTmune for Allogeneic HCT in Adult Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is a Phase 1, Non-randomized, Open-label/Phase 2 Randomized, Blinded Study of ProTmune (ex vivo programmed mobilized peripheral blood cells) Versus Non-programmed mobilized peripheral blood cells for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT) in Adult Subjects Aged 18 years and older with Hematologic Malignancies. A maximum of 80 total eligible subjects will be enrolled and treated in the trial at approximately 15-20 centers in the US.

    at UCSD

  • Study to Evaluate Adverse Events and Movement of Lemzoparlimab in Body When Used Intravenously (IV) With Azacitidine Subcutaneously or IV and Venetoclax Orally in Participants With Acute Myeloid Leukemia and With Azacitdine With or Without Venetoclax in Participants With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most aggressive blood cancers, with a very low survival rate and few options for participants who are unable to undergo intensive chemotherapy, the current standard of care. This study is to evaluate how safe lemzoparlimab (TJ011133) is and how it moves within the body when used along with azacitidine and/or venetoclax in adult participants with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Adverse events and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of lemzoparlimab will be assessed. Lemzoparlimab (TJ011133) is being evaluated in combination with azacitidine and venetoclax for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and with azacitidine with/without venetoclax for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Study doctors place the participants in 1 of 5 groups, called treatment arms. Each group receives a different treatment. Adult participants with a diagnosis of AML or MDS will be enrolled. Around 80 participants will be enrolled in the study in approximately 50 sites worldwide. Participants will receive lemzoparlimab (TJ011133) (IV) once weekly (Q1W), venetoclax oral tablets once daily (QD) for 28 days (AML participants) or 14 days (MDS participants) and Azacitidine by SC or IV route QD for 7 days of each 28-day cycle. There may be higher treatment burden for participants in this trial compared to their standard of care. Participants will attend regular visits during the study at a hospital or clinic. The effect of the treatment will be checked by medical assessments, blood tests, checking for side effects and completing questionnaires.

    at UCLA

  • Study to Evaluate Safety and Tolerability of CC-91633 (BMS-986397) in Participants With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Relapsed or Refractory Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Study CC-91633-AML-001 is a Phase 1, open-label, dose escalation and expansion, first-in-human (FIH) clinical study of CC-91633 (BMS-986397) in participants with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (R/R AML) or in participants with relapsed or refractory higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (R/R HR-MDS). The Dose Escalation part (Part A) of the study will enroll participants with R/R AML and R/R HR-MDS and will evaluate the safety and tolerability of escalating doses of CC-91633 (BMS-986397), administered orally, and determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or preliminary recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) and schedule. Throughout the study, final decisions on dose escalation/de-escalation will be made by the safety review committee (SRC). Approximately 40 participants may be enrolled in Part A of the study. The expansion part (Part B) will confirm tolerability of the selected doses and schedules and evaluate whether efficacy is in a range that warrants further clinical development. Separate expansion cohorts for participants with R/R AML and R/R HR-MDS may enroll approximately 20 to 40 response evaluable participants per cohort. Parts A and B will consist of 3 periods: Screening, Treatment, and Follow-up.

    at UCSD

  • The Efficacy and Safety of Oral Azacitidine Plus Best Supportive Care Versus Placebo and Best Supportive Care in Subjects With Red Blood Cell (RBC) Transfusion-Dependent Anemia and Thrombocytopenia Due to International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) Low Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of Oral Azacitidine plus Best Supportive care versus Placebo and Best Supportive care in subjects with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion-dependent anemia and thrombocytopenia due to International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).

    at UCSD

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