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Solid Neoplasm clinical trials at UC Health
12 in progress, 6 open to new patients

  • Entinostat in Treating Pediatric Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of entinostat in treating pediatric patients with solid tumors that have come back or have not responded to treatment. Entinostat may block some of the enzymes needed for cell division and it may help to kill tumor cells.

    at UCSF

  • Gene-Modified T Cells, Vaccine Therapy, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Locally Advanced Solid Tumors Expressing NY-ESO-1

    open to eligible people ages 16 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of nivolumab when given together with gene-modified T cells and vaccine therapy in treating patients with solid tumors that express the cancer-testes antigen NY-ESO-1 gene AND have spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or distant organs (stage IV). T cells are a special type of white blood cells (immune cell) that have the ability to kill cancer cells. Nivolumab may block PD-1 which is found on T cells and help the immune system kill cancer cells. Placing a modified gene for the NY-ESO-1 T cell receptor (TCR) into the patients' T cells in the laboratory and then giving them back to the patient may help the body build an immune response to kill tumor cells that express NY-ESO-1. Dendritic cells are another type of blood cell that can teach other cells in the body to look for cancer cells and attack them. Giving a dendritic cell vaccine with the NY-ESO-1 protein may help dendritic cells teach the immune system to target cancer cells expressing that protein, and further help the T cells attack cancer. Giving nivolumab together with gene-modified T-cells and dendritic cell vaccine may teach the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells that express NY-ESO-1.

    at UCLA

  • Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin, Temozolomide, and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Pediatric Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin when given together with temozolomide and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating pediatric patients with solid tumors that have come back after a period of time during which the tumor could not be detected or has not responded to treatment. Nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin, temozolomide, and irinotecan hydrochloride may work better in treating pediatric patients with solid tumors.

    at UCSF

  • Prexasertib in Treating Pediatric Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of prexasertib in treating pediatric patients with solid tumors that have come back after a period of time during which the tumor could not be detected or does not respond to treatment. Checkpoint kinase 1 inhibitor LY2606368 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

  • Study of MK-7162 in Combination With Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Adult Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors (MK-7162-002)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purposes of this study are to: 1) determine the safety and tolerability of MK-7162 when administered in combination with pembrolizumab (MK-3475), 2) establish a preliminary recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of MK-7162 when administered in combination with pembrolizumab, and 3) assess the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of MK-7162 when administered in combination with pembrolizumab and other therapies to adult participants with advanced solid tumors.

    at UCLA

  • Targeted therapy for sarcomas, Wilms tumor, rare tumors that have come back, did not respond to treatment, or are newly diagnosed

    “How well does targeted therapy, (cabozantinib-s-malate) work in treating younger patients with sarcomas and rare tumors?”

    open to eligible people ages 2-30

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib-s-malate works in treating younger patients with sarcomas, Wilms tumor, or other rare tumors that have come back, do not respond to therapy, or are newly diagnosed. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for tumor growth and tumor blood vessel growth.

    at UCSF UC Davis

  • Akt Inhibitor GSK2141795, Dabrafenib, and Trametinib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Cancer

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of Akt inhibitor GSK2141795 when given together with dabrafenib and trametinib and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage IIIC-IV cancer. Akt inhibitor GSK2141795, dabrafenib, and trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving Akt inhibitor GSK2141795 with dabrafenib and trametinib may be a better treatment for cancer.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Cabozantinib S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cabozantinib S-malate in treating younger patients with solid tumors that have come back or no longer respond to treatment. Cabozantinib S-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

  • Dabrafenib, Trametinib, and Navitoclax in Treating Patients With BRAF Mutant Melanoma or Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This partially randomized phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of dabrafenib, trametinib, and navitoclax and to see how well they work in treating patients with v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) mutant melanoma or solid tumors that have spread to other parts of the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Dabrafenib, trametinib, and navitoclax may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis

  • Memantine Hydrochloride and Whole-Brain Radiotherapy With or Without Hippocampal Avoidance in Reducing Neurocognitive Decline in Patients With Brain Metastases

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial compares memantine hydrochloride and whole-brain radiotherapy with or without hippocampal avoidance in reducing neurocognitive decline in patients with cancer that has spread from the primary site (place where it started) to the brain. Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is the most common treatment for brain metastasis. Unfortunately, the majority of patients with brain metastases experience cognitive (such as learning and memory) deterioration after WBRT. Memantine hydrochloride may enhance cognitive function by binding to and inhibiting channels of receptors located in the central nervous system. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Using radiation techniques, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy to avoid the hippocampal region during WBRT, may reduce the radiation dose to the hippocampus and help limit the radiation-induced cognitive decline. It is not yet known whether giving memantine hydrochloride and WBRT with or without hippocampal avoidance works better in reducing neurocognitive decline in patients with brain metastases.

    at UCSD

  • Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of selumetinib when given together with cyclosporine in treating patients with solid tumors or colorectal cancer that have spread to other places in the body and cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Selumetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Biological therapies, such as cyclosporine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Giving selumetinib and cyclosporine may be a better treatment for solid tumors or colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Talazoparib and Temozolomide in Treating Younger Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of talazoparib and temozolomide and to see how well they work in treating younger patients with tumors that have not responded to previous treatment (refractory) or have come back (recurrent). Talazoparib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving talazoparib together with temozolomide may work better in treating younger patients with refractory or recurrent malignancies.

    at UCSF

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