Skip to main content

Colorectal Cancer clinical trials at UC Health
89 in progress, 49 open to new patients

  • A Safety Study of Talimogene Laherparepvec Combined With Atezolizumab for Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Colorectal Cancer With Liver Metastases

    open to eligible people ages 18-99

    Approximately 36 subjects will be enrolled in this study. The locations of the study will be in the United States, Australia, Europe and Switzerland. The goal of this study is to evaluate the safety of intrahepatic injection (directly into the liver) of talimogene laherparepvec in combination with intravenously administered atezolizumab in subjects with triple negative breast cancer and colorectal cancer with liver metastases.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of AbGn-107 in Patients With Gastric, Colorectal, Pancreatic or Biliary Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is to define the safety profile and to determine the Maximal tolerated dose regimen and preliminary efficacy of AbGn-107 administered every 28 days (4 weeks) in patients with chemo-refractory locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic gastric, colorectal, pancreatic or biliary cancer.

    at UCSF

  • A Study of Napabucasin (BBI-608) in Combination With FOLFIRI in Adult Patients With Previously Treated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an international multi-center, prospective, open-label, randomized, adaptive design phase 3 trial of the cancer stem cell pathway inhibitor napabucasin plus standard bi-weekly FOLFIRI versus standard bi-weekly FOLFIRI in patients with previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC).

    at UCLA UCSD

  • A Study of PDR001 in Combination With LCL161, Everolimus or Panobinostat

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to combine the PDR001 checkpoint inhibitor with several agents with immunomodulatory activity to identify the doses and schedule for combination therapy and to preliminarily assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacological and clinical activity of these combinations.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of RO7198457 (Personalized Cancer Vaccine [PCV]) as a Single Agent and in Combination With Atezolizumab in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1a/1b, open-label, multicenter, global, dose-escalation study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immune response, and pharmacokinetics of RO7198457 as a single agent and in combination with atezolizumab (MPDL3280A, an engineered anti-programmed death-ligand 1 [anti-PD-L1] antibody).

    at UCSF

  • A Study of SC-006 and in Combination With ABBV-181 in Subjects With Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a multicenter, open-label, Phase 1 study of SC-006 given s a single agent and in combination with ABBV-181 in participants with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), and consists of Part A (single agent SC-006 dose regimen finding), followed by Part B (single agent SC-006 dose expansion), and Part C (SC-006 and ABBV-181 combination escalation and expansion). Part A (dose regimen finding) will involve dose escalation and possible dose interval modification to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and/or recommended Part B dose and schedule. Part B (dose expansion) will enroll additional participants who will be treated with a study drug dose at or below the MTD determined in Part A. Part C is dose escalation of SC-006 and fixed dose of ABBV-181 in combination. Recommended dose cohort of SC-006 with ABBV-181 will be expanded.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of XmAb®20717 in Subjects With Selected Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1, multiple dose, ascending dose escalation study to define a MTD/RD and regimen of XmAb20717, to describe safety and tolerability, to assess PK and immunogenicity, and to preliminarily assess anti-tumor activity of XmAb20717 in subjects with selected advanced solid tumors.

    at UCLA UCSF UCSD

  • A Study to Evaluate Ibrutinib Combination Therapy in Patients With Selected Gastrointestinal and Genitourinary Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of the combination treatment of ibrutinib with everolimus, paclitaxel, docetaxel, or cetuximab in selected advanced gastrointestinal and genitourinary tumors.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • An Investigational Immuno-therapy Study Of Nivolumab In Combination With Trametinib With Or Without Ipilimumab In Patients With Previously Treated Cancer of the Colon or Rectum That Has Spread

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to investigate treatment with Nivolumab in combination with Trametinib with or without Ipilimumab in patients with previously treated cancer of the colon or rectum that has spread.

    at UCSF

  • Anal Cytology Collection Procedures in Predicting High-Grade Anal Dysplasia in Men Who Have Sex With Men

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial compares three anal cytology collection procedures (collected at a single visit) in men who have sex with men (MSM). It also compares two different tests for human papilloma virus, the virus that causes high grade anal dysplasia, which is thought to occur before anal cancer. This study may help doctors develop better screening for high-grade anal dysplasia in MSM in order to identify those who need to return for additional screening and treatment.

    at UCLA

  • Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, multicenter, global Phase 2 basket study of entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the treatment of patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK1/2/3, ROS1, or ALK gene fusion. Patients will be assigned to different baskets according to tumor type and gene fusion.

    at UCSF UCSD UC Irvine

  • Cancer Associated Thrombosis and Isoquercetin (CAT IQ)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This research study is evaluating a drug called isoquercetin to prevent venous thrombosis (blood clots), in participants who have pancreas, non small cell lung cancer or colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Collecting and Studying Tissue Samples From Patients With HIV-Associated Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    RATIONALE: Collecting and studying tissue samples from patients with cancer in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that occur in DNA and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    PURPOSE: This research trial studies collecting tissue samples from patients with HIV-related malignancies.

    at UCSD UCLA

  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer and Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy and atezolizumab to see how well it works compared with combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with stage III colon cancer and deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy with atezolizumab may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with colon cancer.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and/or Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and/or atezolizumab work in treating patients with deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab and atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Combination of TATE and PD-1 Inhibitor in Liver Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    This is a single center, open-label phase IIA study that investigates the preliminary efficacy of Trans-arterial Tirapazamine Embolization (TATE) treatment of liver cancer followed by a PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor (either nivolumab or pembrolizumab). Patients with four types of cancers will be enrolled, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), metastatic gastric cancer and advanced non-small cell lung cancer. All enrolled patients need to have liver lesions.

    at UC Irvine

  • DS-8201a in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor2 (HER2)-Expressing Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The main objective of this study is to test the safety and effectiveness of DS-8201a for participants with HER2-expressing advanced colorectal cancer.

    at UCLA

  • Durvalumab and tremelimumab with/without high/low-dose radiation therapy to treat metastatic colorectal and lung cancer

    “Does giving immunotherapy with radiation therapy work better in treating patients with colorectal or non-small cell lung cancer?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab and tremelimumab and to see how well they work with or without high or low-dose radiation therapy in treating patients with colorectal or non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving durvalumab and tremelimumab with radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with colorectal or non-small cell lung cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Efficacy and Safety Study of Tisotumab Vedotin for Patients With Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial will study tisotumab vedotin to find out whether it is an effective treatment for certain solid tumors and what side effects (unwanted effects) may occur. The treatment will be given to patients every three weeks.

    at UC Davis

  • Efficacy Evaluation of TheraSphere Following Failed First Line Chemotherapy in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The effectiveness and safety of TheraSphere will be evaluated in patients with colorectal cancer with metastases in the liver, who are scheduled to receive second line chemotherapy. All patients receive the standard of care chemotherapy with or without the addition of TheraSphere.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Experimental Medicine (Transuzumab and Pertuzunab) in Advanced Colorectal Cancer with Genetic Component

    “Help us examine how well experimental drugs work compared to standard-use drugs in treating colorectal cancer.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2/neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Experimental medicine in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 19 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab when given with ipilimumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment, or solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Ipilimumab is an antibody that acts against a molecule called cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). CTLA-4 controls a part of your immune system by shutting it down. Nivolumab is a type of antibody that is specific for human programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), a protein that is responsible for destruction of immune cells. Giving ipilimumab with nivolumab may work better in treating patients with HIV associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma or solid tumors.

    at UCLA UCSF UCSD UC Davis

  • Experimental Radiotracer Imaging Study for Cancer Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the side effects of 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide and how well it works in imaging patients with primary or cancer that has spread to the breast, colorectal, lung, or pancreatic. Radiotracers, such as 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide, may improve the ability to locate cancer in the body.

    at UC Davis

  • Expressing Personalized Tumor Antigens Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 1, open-label, uncontrolled, multicenter study in 3 distinct solid tumors. The study design is dose-escalation/de-escalation using a standard 3 + 3 design to evaluate the safety profile of ADXS-NEO, to select a recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), and identify initial signs of clinical activity in each of the 3 tumor-specific cohorts.

    at UCLA

  • Longitudinal Performance of Epi proColon

    open to eligible people ages 50-74

    This study will evaluate longitudinal performance of Epi proColon with respect to test positivity, longitudinal adherence to Epi proColon screening, adherence to follow-up colonoscopy and diagnostic yield, as well as assay failure rates.

    at UCSD

  • Multicenter Phase II Study of Transanal TME (taTME)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Radical rectal cancer resection, namely total mesorectal excision (TME), is the cornerstone of the treatment of resectable rectal cancer. In combination with chemotherapy and radiation treatment (CRT), complete TME with negative resection margins is associated with sustained local and systemic control even in locally advanced disease. Over the last 2 decades, laparoscopic and robotic techniques have been increasingly adopted due to reduced surgical trauma and faster patient recovery. Yet, both approaches are associated with equivalent postoperative morbidity and disturbances in sexual, urinary and defecatory function relative to open TME. Furthermore, laparoscopic and robotic TME remain associated with substantial conversion rates and variable rates of TME completeness as a result of the procedural difficulties reaching the low rectum from the abdominal approach. Transanal TME (taTME) with laparoscopic assistance was developed to facilitate completion of TME using a primary transanal endoscopic approach. Transanal TME uses a "bottom-up approach" to overcome the technical difficulties of low pelvic dissection using an abdominal approach. Published results from single-center taTME series and an international registry suggest the short-term procedural and oncologic safety of this approach in resectable rectal cancer. No multicenter phase II study has yet been conducted to validate the procedural safety, functional outcomes or long-term oncologic outcomes of this approach. Study Design: This is a 5-year phase II multicenter single-arm study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low anterior resection (LAR) with taTME using laparoscopic or robotic assistance in 100 eligible subjects with resectable rectal cancer. Hypothesis: taTME is non-inferior to standard LAR with respect to the quality of the TME achieved.

    at UC Irvine

  • Nivolumab After Combined Modality Therapy in Treating Patients With High Risk Stage II-IIIB Anal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II clinical trial studies how well nivolumab after combined modality therapy works in treating patients with high risk stage II-IIIB anal cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Oxaliplatin Microdosing Assay in Predicting Exposure and Sensitivity to Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well carbon C 14 oxaliplatin microdosing assay works in predicting exposure and sensitivity to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Carbon C 14 is a radioactive form of carbon, exists in nature and in the body at a low level. Microdose carbon C 14 oxaliplatin diagnostic assay may help doctors understand how well patients respond to treatment and develop individualize oxaliplatin dosing in patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Patient-Centered Risk Adjusted Surveillance After Curative Resection of Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    The long-term goal of this research is to develop new tools to guide patients, caregivers, and clinicians in making individualized decisions regarding colorectal cancer (CRC) surveillance. As part of a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded contract, investigator will analyze surveillance data to determine the effectiveness of CRC surveillance and recurrence risk taking into account different patient and tumor characteristics; identify key issues about CRC surveillance important to patients, caregivers, and clinicians; and integrate the recurrence risk and patient priorities into a patient-centered, risk stratified surveillance strategy by creating an interactive decision aid for use by patients and clinicians. This protocol addresses a formative step in the creation of the interactive decision aid where patients' information needs and preferences are assessed regarding decisions about surveillance. The specific aims of this protocol are: Phase 1 - To interview patients and their caregivers to determine their concerns, preferences and key priorities regarding surveillance after curative resection of colorectal cancer, and Phase 2 - To refine the key priorities identified in phase 1 through focus groups and surveys with patients and caregivers.

    at UCSF

  • Pembrolizumab Combined With Itacitinib (INCB039110) and/or Pembrolizumab Combined With INCB050465 in Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, multicenter, Phase 1b platform study in subjects with advanced or metastatic solid tumors (Part 1a) and subjects with selected solid tumors (Part 1b and Part 2). Two treatment groups (Group A and Group B) will be evaluated Part 1a utilizes a 3+3 design to evaluate pembrolizumab and INCB combinations in advanced solid tumors. Group A will evaluate a JAK inhibitor with JAK1 selectivity itacitinib (INCB039110) in combination with pembrolizumab (MK-3475) and Group B will evaluate a PI3K-delta inhibitor (INCB050465) in combination with pembrolizumab to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or PAD and recommend a dose for the Part 1b safety expansion with each combination. Once the recommended dose has been identified in Part 1a, subjects with select solid tumor types will be enrolled into safety expansion cohorts based upon prior treatment history with a PD-1 pathway-targeted agent (Part 1b) for each combination. Part 2 utilizes a Simon 2-Stage design to evaluate INCB050465 in combination with pembrolizumab in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and a 1 stage design to evaluate the combination in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and urothelial cancer (UC).

    at UCSF

  • Pembrolizumab, Capecitabine, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Microsatellite Stable Colorectal Cancer That Is Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and best dose of capecitabine when given together with pembrolizumab and bevacizumab, and to see how well they work in treating patients with microsatellite stable colorectal cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes, has spread to other places in the body, or that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab and bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving capecitabine together with pembrolizumab and bevacizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Phase 1 Study of the Highly-selective RET Inhibitor BLU-667 in Patients With Thyroid Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Other Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1, open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary antineoplastic activity of BLU-667 administered orally in patients with medullary thyroid cancer, RET-altered NSCLC and other RET-altered solid tumors.

    at UC Irvine

  • Phase 1/1b Study to Evaluate the Safety and Tolerability of CPI-444 Alone and in Combination With Atezolizumab in Advanced Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 1/1b open-label, multicenter, dose-selection study of CPI-444, an oral small molecule targeting the adenosine-A2A receptor on T-lymphocytes and other cells of the immune system. This trial will study the safety, tolerability, and anti-tumor activity of CPI-444 as a single agent and in combination with atezolizumab, a PD-L1 inhibitor against various solid tumors. CPI-444 blocks adenosine from binding to the A2A receptor. Adenosine suppresses the anti-tumor activity of T cells and other immune cells.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Phase 1/2 Study of LOXO-195 in Patients With Previously Treated NTRK Fusion Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 1 month and up

    This is a Phase 1/2, multi-center, open-label study designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of LOXO-195 when administered orally to patients age ≥ 1 month and older with NTRK fusion cancers treated with a prior TRK inhibitor.

    at UCLA

  • Phase 1/2 Study of LOXO-292 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, RET Fusion-Positive Solid Tumors, and Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This is a Phase 1/2, open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and preliminary anti-tumor activity of LOXO-292 administered orally to patients with advanced solid tumors, including RET-fusion-positive solid tumors, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and other tumors with RET activation.

    at UCLA UCSF UCSD

  • Phase I Study of Enadenotucirev and PD-1 Inhibitor in Subjects With Metastatic or Advanced Epithelial Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase I multicenter, open label, nonrandomized study of enadenotucirev administered in combination with nivolumab in subjects with metastatic or advanced epithelial tumors (with focus on CRC, UCC, SCCHN and salivary gland cancer) not responding to standard therapy.

    at UCLA

  • PROSPECT: Chemotherapy Alone or Chemotherapy Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer involves chemotherapy and radiation, known as 5FUCMT, (the chemotherapy drugs 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine and radiation therapy) prior to surgery. Although radiation therapy to the pelvis has been a standard and important part of treatment for rectal cancer and has been shown to decrease the risk of the cancer coming back in the same area in the pelvis, some patients experience undesirable side effects from the radiation and there have been important advances in chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation which may be of benefit. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, both good and bad, of the standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation to chemotherapy using a combination regimen known as FOLFOX, (the drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and leucovorin) and selective use of the standard treatment, depending on response to the FOLFOX. The drugs in the FOLFOX regimen are all FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved and have been used routinely to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UC Davis UCSF

  • S0820, Adenoma and Second Primary Prevention Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The investigators hypothesize that the combination of eflornithine and sulindac will be effective in reducing a three-year event rate of adenomas and second primary colorectal cancers in patients previously treated for Stages 0 through III colon cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSD

  • Safety Study of MGD009 in B7-H3-expressing Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of MGD009 when given to patients with B7-H3-expressing tumors. The study will also evaluate what is the highest dose of MGD009 that can be given safely. Assessments will be done to see how the drug acts in the body (pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and to evaluate potential anti-tumor activity of MGD009.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Self-monitoring and Reminder Texts to Increase Physical Activity After Cancer II

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    There is a critical need for physical activity interventions in CRC. The investigators have developed a digital health physical activity intervention, Smart Pace, which includes a wearable tracker (Fitbit) and text messaging and aims to have patients build up to 150 min/wk of moderate activity. In this study, the investigators propose to expand and improve Smart Pace, including: 1) enrolling patients during chemotherapy; 2) tailoring text messages to individual preferences and treatment timing; and 3) adding resources to support home-based exercise. The study is a 12-week pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the feasibility of this novel digital health physical activity intervention among 48 CRC patients on chemotherapy. The specific aims are to: 1) Determine the feasibility of the intervention via adherence and attrition, and determine the acceptability of the intervention via questionnaires and semi-structured interviews . 2) Estimate the effect of the intervention vs. usual care on physical activity, QOL, and symptoms at 12-weeks . And 3) Explore the impact of the intervention vs. usual care on fitness, weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure at 12-weeks.

    at UCSF

  • Small Media Interventions to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Chinese Americans

    open to eligible people ages 50-75

    There have been few studies of small media interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening among Chinese Americans. Based on the results of strong preliminary studies on the promotion of colorectal cancer screening among Asian American populations, this community-academic research team propose to develop a culturally and linguistically appropriate traditional small media print brochure and a novel small media electronic audio-visual application accessible through mobile applications and through a website to promote CRC screening in English, Cantonese, and Mandarin. The team will test in a randomized controlled trial in 3 healthcare systems the efficacy of a combination of these small media interventions and a mailed patient reminder compared to usual care on increasing CRC screening among Chinese American patients.

    at UCSF

  • Study of LOXO-101 (Larotrectinib) in Subjects With NTRK Fusion Positive Solid Tumors (NAVIGATE)

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    Phase II, multi-center, open-label study of patients with advanced solid tumors harboring a fusion of NTRK1, NTRK2 or NTRK3.

    at UCLA

  • Surgery in Treating Patients With Early Stage Anal Canal or Perianal Cancer and HIV Infection

    open to all eligible people

    This phase II trial studies surgery in treating patients with anal canal or perianal cancer that is small and has not spread deeply into the tissues and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Local surgery may be a safer treatment with fewer side effects than bigger surgery or radiation and chemotherapy.

    at UCSF

  • Survivor Choices for Eating and Drinking - Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Epidemiologic data suggest that a Western dietary pattern after diagnosis of colorectal cancer increases risk of disease recurrence and death. High intake of red and processed meat, dairy, refined grains, and sweets/desserts characterize a 'Western dietary pattern'. This study aims to translate the epidemiologic findings into a patient-centered, web-based dietary intervention with text messaging to inform and modify users' dietary choices. The investigators' specific aims are to: 1) Develop a web-based dietary intervention with text messaging for colorectal cancer survivors; and 2) Conduct a 12-week pilot randomized controlled trial to determine the acceptability and feasibility of the dietary intervention among 50 colorectal cancer survivors. All participants will receive standard of care print materials regarding diet following a colorectal cancer diagnosis. Participants in the intervention group will also receive access to a web-based dietary intervention with text messaging for 12 weeks. This study will generate preliminary data on the effect of the intervention on dietary choices among colorectal cancer survivors for future studies.

    at UCSF

  • Targeted chemotherapy, (Veliparib) and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patient With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    “Does giving veliparib with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy kill more tumor cells?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well veliparib or pembrolizumab work with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as modified (m)FOLFOX6 regimen, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving veliparib or pembrolizumab with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells, make the tumor smaller, and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.

    at UCSD UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UC Davis

  • Tas-102 and Radioembolization With 90Y Resin Microspheres for Chemo-refractory Colorectal Liver Metastases

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase I dose escalation study (3+3 design) with a dose expansion arm (12 patients) designed to evaluate safety of the combination of Tas-102 and radioembolization using Yttrium-90 (90Y) resin microspheres for patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver-dominant chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

    at UCSF

  • Topical or Ablative Treatment in Preventing Anal Cancer in Patients With HIV and Anal High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions

    open to eligible people ages 35 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial compares topical or ablative treatment with active monitoring in preventing anal cancer in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Anal HSIL is tissue in the anal canal that has been damaged by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and is at risk for turning into anal cancer. It is not yet known if treating HSIL is more effective than active monitoring in preventing patients from developing anal cancer.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Trial of Hu5F9-G4 in Combination With Cetuximab in Patients With Solid Tumors and Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial will evaluate Hu5F9-G4 in combination with cetuximab. Hu5F9-G4 is a monoclonal antibody which is designed to block a protein called CD47, which is widely expressed on human cancer cells. Blocking CD47 with Hu5F9-G4 may enable the body's immune system to find and destroy the cancer cells. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody drug that is used for treatment of certain types of colorectal cancer as well as head and neck cancer. The major aims of the study are: (Phase 1b) to define the safety profile and to determine a recommended Phase 2 dose for Hu5F9-G4 in combination with cetuximab, and (Phase 2) to evaluate the objective response rate of Hu5F9-G4 in combination with cetuximab in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    at UCLA

  • A Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of Anti-CD27 (Varlilumab) and Anti-PD-1 (Nivolumab) in Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a study to determine the clinical benefit (how well the drug works), safety, and tolerability of combining varlilumab and nivolumab (also known as Opdivo® , BMS-936558). Both drugs target the immune system and may act to promote anti-cancer effects.

    at UCSF

  • A Phase 1 Study of AM0010 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a first-in-human, open-label, dose escalation study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of AM0010 in patients with advanced solid tumors, dosed daily subcutaneously as a monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy or immunotherapy.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • A Phase 1/2 Study Exploring the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Combination With Epacadostat (INCB024360) in Subjects With Selected Cancers (INCB 24360-202 / MK-3475-037 / KEYNOTE-037/ ECHO-202)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to assess the safety, tolerability, and efficacy when combining MK-3475 and INCB024360 in subjects with certain cancers. This study will be conducted in 2 phases, Phase 1 and Phase 2.

    at UCSD

  • A Phase 1/2 Study of INCB001158 in Combination With Chemotherapy in Subjects With Solid Tumors

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this open-label nonrandomized Phase 1/2 study is to evaluate INCB001158 in combination with chemotherapy in participants with advanced/metastatic solid tumors.

    at UC Davis

  • A Phase 2 Randomized, Open-Label Study of RRx-001 vs Regorafenib in Subjects With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This two-stage study is designed to compare the safety and activity between RRx-001 against regorafenib followed by irinotecan-based therapies in a parallel comparative study. Patients who are suffering from advanced or metastatic (meaning the disease has spread) colorectal cancer are invited to participate in this study. There will be two groups of patients (Randomized, open label study), one of these will receive RRx-001 and the other one will receive regorafenib. If patients qualify to participate in this study, they will be randomly assigned to the 'interventional arm' where patients will receive the experimental drug, RRx-001, or the 'control arm' where they will receive the current standard-of-care, Regorafenib. Patients have a 66% chance (2 out of 3) of receiving RRx-001 and a 33 % chance (1 out of 3) of receiving regorafenib. On progression in the first part of the study, provided ECOG performance status is adequate, and if clinically appropriate i.e. there are no absolute or relative contraindications in the opinion of the Investigator, all subjects will enter the second part of the study and receive irinotecan plus bevacizumab. Whether patients are given RRx-001 or regorafenib, they will also receive best supportive care, which includes treatments to help manage side effects and symptoms of cancer. This is an open label study, which means patients will know to which of these treatments, RRx-001 or regorafenib, they are assigned.

    at UCSD

  • A Prospective Study for the Assessment of Recurrence Risk in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients Using ColoPrint

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The aim of this study is to enroll 785 eligible stage II colon cancer patients in order to validate the performance of ColoPrint in estimating 3-year relapse rate. Secondary objectives include comparing the objective risk assessment results from the prognostic profile (ColoPrint) to both the risk assessment based on the ASCO criteria, as well as the Investigator's independent assessment. As this is the first prospective study of ColoPrint, this study will also address the logistics and quality assurance of using ColoPrint in clinical practice. Patient treatment is at the discretion of the physician, adhering to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN)-approved regimens or a recognized alternative. The enrollment period will be 6 years. It is expected that 1800 to 2400 patients will be enrolled in order to obtain 785 analysable stage II samples from eligible patients. Approximately 25-35 clinical sites will be involved worldwide. The statistical analysis will be performed by Agendia and an independent research institute or hospital. Study Design Extension Study: This will be a prospective study to measure the impact of ColoPrint on adjuvant treatment in stage 2 colorectal cancer patients. After surgery the tumor sample will be shipped in RNA Retain to Agendia. The online Clinical Report Form (CRF) 0 will be completed to document if the patient fulfils the inclusion criteria. Baseline clinical data and the patient and physician chemotherapy intention, patient's perceived recurrence risk and decisional conflict without knowing the ColoPrint result will be entered in CRF 1. After completion of CRF1 the ColoPrint result is released. CRF2 will be completed after the final treatment decision has been made. This CRF will capture the patient and physician chemotherapy intention, patient's perceived recurrence risk and decisional conflict, impact of ColoPrint and the actual treatment the patient will receive. CRF3 will be completed 12 months after enrolment and will capture the patient status, patient's perceived recurrence risk and decisional conflict. CRF4 and 5 will be completed 3 and 5 years after surgery and will capture the patient status. A sample size of 210 stage 2 colon cancer patients is required to detect a 10% overall treatment change (5% significance and 90% power). Reporting of the Results: Blinded Study; The ColoPrint results will not be reported to the physician and/or patient at the time of enrolment. All samples will be stored in a freezer until 550-575 eligible stage II patients have been enrolled. Samples will then be analyzed in one batch in a blinded fashion from the clinical results. Extension Study; The ColoPrint results will be reported to the physician and patient after CRF1 has been completed.

    at UC Davis

  • A Rollover Study for Patients Who Received CP-675,206 in Other Protocols, to Allow the Patients Access to CP-675,206 Until This Agent Becomes Commercially Available or Development is Discontinued.

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is intended to provide access to CP-675,206 for patients who have previously received CP-675,206 in a clinical trial.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of ABT-165 Plus FOLFIRI vs Bevacizumab Plus FOLFIRI in Subjects With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Previously Treated With Fluoropyrimidine/ Oxaliplatin and Bevacizumab

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    A study to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of ABT-165 plus FOLFIRI compared to bevacizumab plus FOLFIRI in participants with previously treated metastatic adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum.

    at UCLA UC Davis

  • A Study of Cologuard™ in an Average Risk Population Assessing a Three Year Test Interval

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a prospective longitudinal study to assess the impact of repeat Cologuard testing at 3 years in average risk patients.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of Epacadostat in Combination With Pembrolizumab and Chemotherapy in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors (ECHO-207/KEYNOTE-723)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, nonrandomized, Phase 1/2 study in subjects with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. Phase 1 is an assessment to evaluate the safety and tolerability of epacadostat when given in combination with pembrolizumab and chemotherapy. Once the recommended doses have been confirmed, subjects with advanced or metastatic CRC, PDAC, NSCLC (squamous or nonsquamous), UC, SCCHN or any advanced or metastatic solid tumor who progressed on previous therapy with a PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor will be enrolled in Phase 2.

    at UCSD

  • A Study of the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Epacadostat Administered in Combination With Nivolumab in Select Advanced Cancers (ECHO-204)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1/2, open label study. Phase 1 consists of 2 parts. Part 1 is a dose-escalation assessment of the safety and tolerability of epacadostat administered with nivolumab in subjects with select advanced solid tumors and lymphomas. Part 2 will evaluate the safety and tolerability of epacadostat in combination with nivolumab and chemotherapy in subjects with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Phase 2 will include expansion cohorts in 7 tumor types, including melanoma, NSCLC, SCCHN, colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, glioblastoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).

    at UCSF

  • Accuracy for Predicting Deep Submucosal Invasion

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The main aim of this study is to determine whether the assessment of the invasive pattern based on NBI with dual focus/magnification or BLI with magnification ± chromoendoscopy (NBI+CE) for predicting deep invasion is significantly more accurate than the assessment based on white light endoscopy (WLE), carried out by trained endoscopists.

    at UCSF

  • Akt Inhibitor GSK2141795, Dabrafenib, and Trametinib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Cancer

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of Akt inhibitor GSK2141795 when given together with dabrafenib and trametinib and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage IIIC-IV cancer. Akt inhibitor GSK2141795, dabrafenib, and trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving Akt inhibitor GSK2141795 with dabrafenib and trametinib may be a better treatment for cancer.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Anal HPV Tests in Screening for Cell Changes in the Anus in Patients With HIV

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This clinical trial studies anal human papillomavirus (HPV) tests in screening for cell changes in the anus in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Screening tests may help doctors find cancer cells early and plan better treatment for anal cancer. Completing multiple screening tests may help find the best method for detecting cell changes in the anus.

    at UCSF UCLA

  • BRAF/MEK/EGFR Inhibitor Combination Study in Colorectal Cancer (CRC)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, four-part Phase I/II study to investigate the safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical activity of trametinib (GSK1120212) and dabrafenib (GSK2118436) when administered in combination with the anti-EGFR antibody panitumumab in subjects with BRAF-mutation V600E positive colorectal cancer (CRC) and in subjects with CRC with secondary resistance to prior anti-EGFR therapy. Part 1 of the study will consist of dose-escalation cohorts, following a 3 + 3 enrollment scheme. Part 2 of the study will consist of expansion cohorts to investigate safety and clinical activity of dabrafenib in combination with panitumumab and trametinib plus dabrafenib in combination with panitumumab. Part 3 of the study will be a randomized Phase II study comparing dosing with dabrafenib in combination with panitumumab and trametinib plus dabrafenib in combination with panitumumab as compared to the chemotherapy comparator (a regimen of leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride (FOLFIRI) or irinotecan with or without panitumumab or bevacizumab). Subjects will be assigned to treatment groups in a randomized fashion to compare safety and clinical activity. Part 4 of the study will investigate the trametinib/panitumumab combination, including dose escalation and subsequent cohort expansion in two patient populations: 1) BRAF-mutation V600E positive CRC and 2) subjects with CRC who developed secondary resistance to prior anti-EGFR therapy. The objective of Part 4 is to identify the recommended Phase 2 dose/regimen for trametinib dosed in combination with panitumumab in dose escalation and to identify an initial signal of clinical activity in expansion cohorts.

    at UCSF

  • Cetuximab and/or Bevacizumab Combined With Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying cetuximab and/or bevacizumab when given together with combination chemotherapy to compare how well they work in treating patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. RATIONALE: Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab and bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Cetuximab may also stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Bevacizumab may also stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving monoclonal antibodies together with combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with cetuximab and/or bevacizumab in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Colonoscopy Versus Fecal Immunochemical Test in Reducing Mortality From Colorectal Cancer (CONFIRM)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently the second most common cause of cancer death in the United States, and one of the most preventable cancers. It has been shown in several randomized controlled trials that screening using fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) reduces CRC mortality by 13-33%. While there is strong consensus amongst experts regarding the value of CRC screening, the best approach to screening is not clear. Of the widely recommended modalities, FOBT and colonoscopy are the most commonly used within the United States. FOBT is inexpensive, non-invasive, and its use as a screening tool is supported by the highest quality evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials). Moreover, newer FOBT, such as fecal immunochemical tests or FITs, have advantages over conventional FOBT in terms of both test characteristics and ease of use that make them quite attractive as a population-based screening tool. While colonoscopy is invasive and has higher up-front risks and costs than FOBT, it does afford the opportunity to directly assess the colonic mucosa and is widely believed to be the best test to detect colorectal cancer. In addition, colonoscopy allows for the detection and removal of colorectal adenomas -a well recognized colorectal cancer precursor. There is indirect evidence that suggests colonoscopy is effective in reducing colorectal cancer mortality, but to date, no large clinical trials have been completed to support this assumption. While colonoscopy use is increasing, data is emerging that colonoscopy may not be as effective as previously believed. Prior support for colonoscopy as a screening test relied upon effectiveness estimates that now appear to be overly optimistic. Given the invasive nature of colonoscopy, the associated small, but real risk of complications, and dramatically higher costs than other screening tests, it is especially important to determine the true comparative effectiveness of colonoscopy relative to other proven non-invasive options. The investigators propose to perform a, large, simple, multicenter, randomized, parallel group trial directly comparing screening colonoscopy with annual FIT screening in average risk individuals. The hypothesis is that colonoscopy will be superior to FIT in the prevention of colorectal cancer mortality measured over 10 years. Individuals will be enrolled if they are currently eligible for CRC screening (e.g. no colonoscopy in the past 10 years and no FOBT in the past 1 year) and are between 50 and 75 years of age. The investigators will exclude individuals for whom colonoscopy is indicated (e.g. signs or symptoms of CRC, first degree family member with CRC, personal history of colorectal neoplasia or inflammatory bowel disease). All participants will complete baseline demographic, medication, and lifestyle questionnaires (e.g. diet, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory use, frequency of exercise) prior to randomization in a 1:1 ratio to either screening colonoscopy or annual FIT screening (Figure 1). Those testing positive by FIT will undergo evaluation to determine appropriateness for colonoscopy. Screening will be performed in a manner consistent with the currently accepted standard of care in order to determine the comparative effectiveness of the two screening strategies. Participants will be surveyed annually to determine if they have undergone colonoscopy or been diagnosed with CRC. The primary study endpoint will be CRC mortality within 10 years of enrollment. The secondary endpoints are (1) the incidence of CRC within 10 years of enrollment and (2) major complications of colonoscopy. Mortality will be determined through queries of the VA Vital Status File. Cause of death will be determined primarily using death certificates from the National Death Index-Plus database, augmented by adjudication of medical records for known CRC cases where CRC is not listed as a cause of death on the death certificate. The investigators postulate that screening colonoscopy will result in a 40% reduction in CRC mortality over 10 years relative to annual FIT screening. Using a log-rank test with a 2-sided test of significance, =0.05, a sample size of 50,000 participants will be required to test the primary hypothesis with 82% power, assuming a 1% annual rate of crossover from FIT to colonoscopy and a 0.5% annual rate of loss to follow-up. The planned study duration is 12.5 years with 2.5 years of recruitment and 10 years of follow-up for all enrolled participants.

    at UCSD

  • Dose Finding Study of Once or Twice Weekly IMMU-130 in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase I/II, open-label study of IMMU-130 administered in 21-day treatment cycles, once or twice weekly for 2 consecutive weeks followed by one week of rest to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have been previously treated with at least one prior irinotecan-containing regimen. The study is being done to evaluate whether the study drug is safe and tolerable at different dose levels with these dosing schedules and to obtain preliminary information on its efficacy.

    at UCLA

  • Evaluation of Rectal Cancer Treatment Response Using PET/MRI

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators will be using the combination of FDG-PET and multiparametric MRI in pre- and post-adjuvant chemoradiation therapy in order to attempt to predict pathologic response on surgical resection.

    at UCSF

  • Experimental drug Romidepsin in cancer: Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Select Solid Tumors, Liver dysfunction

    “Study of Experimental medicine for non-treatable liver cancer”

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin in treating patients with lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or solid tumors with liver dysfunction. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by entering the cancer cells and by blocking the activity of proteins that are important for the cancer's growth and survival.

    at UC Davis

  • Glucagon and Colonoscopy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators believe that glucagon therapy will have a positive impact on key parameters of colonoscopy such as cecal intubation time, withdrawal time, total procedure time, adenoma detection rate, endoscopist's assessment of the difficulty of the procedure, patient comfort, and patient's willingness to undergo a repeat colonoscopy.

    at UCSF

  • Improving Competency and Metrics for PoLypectomy Skills Using Evaluation Tools and VidEo Feedback (COMPLETE)

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    I plan to investigate the value of video-based feedback in endoscopic training - specifically, the role of terminal video feedback as compared to usual concurrent feedback on cold snare polypectomy technique in trainees, using Direct Observation of Polypectomy Skills (DOPyS) competency score. I have focused the study on the competency of cold snare polypectomy for subcentimeter polyps. The majority (>75%) of colon polyps are smaller than one centimeter. Cold snare polypectomy has been shown, and recommended by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), to be an effective removal technique. However, its widespread use and moreover, its teaching to trainees is lacking. It takes time and resources to learn and teach endoscopic techniques. Our study will hope to identify a mechanism through video-based feedback that could help to improve the translation of the training of polypectomy skills to its actual performance, and to accelerate the learning curve.

    at UCSF

  • Irinotecan and Alisertib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of alisertib when given together with irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with advanced solid tumors or colorectal cancer. Irinotecan hydrochloride and alisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis

  • Mailed FIT Outreach to Improve Colon Cancer Screening in the Safety-net System

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Uptake of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is suboptimal in the San Francisco Health Network and access to care may be limited so novel models of health care delivery are warranted. The objective of this study is to examine whether a centralized panel management model with mailed fecal immunochemical test (FIT) will be effective at increasing the uptake of CRC screening and could be developed and sustained within the typical parameters of cost-effectiveness and budget impact analyses.

    at UCSF

  • Nivolumab With or Without Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Anal Canal Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab with or without ipilimumab works in treating patients with anal canal cancer that has not responded to previous treatment (refractory) and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    at UC Davis

  • Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Surgery for Stage II Colon Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and bevacizumab to see how well they work compared to oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil in treating patients who have undergone surgery for stage II colon cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving combination chemotherapy together with bevacizumab is more effective than combination chemotherapy alone in treating colon cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil With or Without Celecoxib in Treating Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying giving oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil together to compare how well they work when given together with or without celecoxib in treating patients with stage III colon cancer previously treated with surgery. RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Celecoxib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil is more effective with or without celecoxib in treating colon cancer.

    at UCSF UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil With or Without Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Fluorouracil may also make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. Leucovorin calcium may protect normal cells from the side effects of chemotherapy, and it may help fluorouracil work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drug. Giving radiation therapy together with chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.

    PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying how well giving radiation therapy together with fluorouracil with or without combination therapy works in treating patients who are undergoing surgery for stage II or stage III rectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • S1406 Phase II Study of Irinotecan and Cetuximab With or Without Vemurafenib in BRAF Mutant Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well irinotecan hydrochloride and cetuximab with or without vemurafenib works in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes, that has spread to other places in the body, or cannot be removed by surgery. Irinotecan hydrochloride and vemurafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether irinotecan hydrochloride and cetuximab are more effective with or without vemurafenib in treating colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis UCSF

  • Safety and Tolerability Study in Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, multicenter, sequential dose-escalation, and expansion study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of andecaliximab (formerly GS-5745) alone and in combination with chemotherapy. The study consists of 2 parts (Parts A and B). Participants can only qualify for and participate in 1 part. Part A is a sequential dose escalation to determine the maximum tolerated dose of andecaliximab in participants with advanced solid tumors that are refractory to or intolerant to standard therapy or for which no standard therapy exists. In Part A, participants will receive andecaliximab only. Part A will consist of between 12 to 48 participants. Part B is a dose expansion to obtain additional safety and tolerability data for andecaliximab in participants with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, esophagogastric adenocarcinoma, colorectal cancer, or breast cancer. In Part B, participants will receive andecaliximab in combination with standard-of-care chemotherapy. Part B will consist of between 115 to 295 participants. Please note the study is currently only recruiting in the breast cancer cohorts.

    at UCLA

  • Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of selumetinib when given together with cyclosporine in treating patients with solid tumors or colorectal cancer that have spread to other places in the body and cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Selumetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Biological therapies, such as cyclosporine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Giving selumetinib and cyclosporine may be a better treatment for solid tumors or colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Study of Binimetinib + Nivolumab Plus or Minus Ipilimumab in Patients With Previously Treated Microsatellite-stable (MSS) Metastatic Colorectal Cancer With RAS Mutation

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a multicenter, open-label, Phase 1B/2 study to evaluate the safety and assess the preliminary anti-tumor activity of binimetinib administered in combination with nivolumab or nivolumab + ipilimumab in adult patients with advanced metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with microsatellite stable (MSS) disease and presence of a RAS mutation that have received at least one prior line of therapy and no more than 2 prior lines of therapy. The study contains a Phase 1b period to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) and schedule of binimetinib followed by a randomized Phase 2 period to assess the efficacy of the combinations.

    at UCLA

  • Study of LGX818 and Cetuximab or LGX818, BYL719, and Cetuximab in BRAF Mutant Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will assess the safety and efficacy of LGX818 when combined with cetuximab or combined with cetuximab and BYL719 in patients with BRAF mutant metastatic colorectal cancer

    at UCLA

  • Study of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) as Monotherapy in Participants With Previously-Treated Locally Advanced Unresectable or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (MK-3475-164/KEYNOTE-164)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In this study, participants with previously-treated locally-advanced unresectable or metastatic mismatched repair (MMR) deficient or microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) colorectal carcinoma (CRC) will be treated with pembrolizumab (MK-3475, KEYTRUDA®) monotherapy. There will be two cohorts in this study: Cohort A and Cohort B. For Cohort A, participants are required to have been previously treated with standard therapies, which must include fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan. Enrollment into Cohort A has been completed. For Cohort B, participants are required to have been previously treated with at least one line of systemic standard of care therapy: fluoropyrimidine + oxaliplatin or fluoropyrimidine + irinotecan +/ - anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/ epidermal growth factor regulator (EGFR) monoclonal antibody.

    at UCSF

  • Study of Personalized Immunotherapy in Adults With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will evaluate the safety and tolerability of a personalized live, attenuated, double-deleted Listeria monocytogenes (pLADD) treatment in adults with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    at UCLA UC Davis

  • Study of Topical ABI-1968 in Subjects With Precancerous Anal Lesions Resulting From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study evaluates the use of ABI-1968, a topical cream, in the treatment of anal precancerous lesions in adults with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

    at UCSF

  • Study to Increase Colorectal Screening

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether inreach and outreach strategies will be superior to usual care, and combination of both will be superior to either strategy alone.

    at UCSD

  • The Active After Cancer Trial (AACT)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is being done to determine whether a telephone-based counseling intervention can help survivors of breast and colorectal cancer increase their weekly physical activity. Observational evidence suggests that physical activity after breast and colorectal cancer diagnosis decreases recurrence rates. Unfortunately, many people become less active during cancer therapy, and a substantial proportion never return to pre-diagnosis levels of physical activity. This study looks to see if people who have recently finished chemotherapy for breast, colon or rectal cancer can be motivated to increase their exercise by talking to an exercise specialist over the phone. The study also looks at changes in mood, fatigue, fitness, fat distribution and weight.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Trial Evaluating 3-year Disease Free Survival in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Plus Induction or Consolidation Chemotherapy and Total Mesorectal Excision or Non-operative Management

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The study is designed to test the hypothesis that patients with Locally advanced rectal cancer ( LARC) treated with Total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) and Total mesorectal excision (TME) or Non-operative management (NOM) will have an improved 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to patients with similar tumors treated with Chemoradiation therapy (CRT), Total mesorectal excision (TME) and Adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT).

    at UCSF UC Irvine

  • Trial of Aspirin and Arginine Restriction in Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this research study is to understand the effects of oral aspirin taken daily with an arginine-restricted diet on certain colorectal cancer biomarkers in treated colorectal cancer patients. Patients with colorectal cancer are at high risk for recurrence and for development of secondary colorectal cancers in the future. Specific chemicals (polyamines, prostaglandins) in the body referred to as biomarkers can be measured to help understand a person's risk for developing colorectal cancer. Specific biomarkers associated with colorectal cancer have been identified in prior laboratory studies. By measuring these predefined biomarkers before and after the study intervention, we can assess how they are affected by the intervention, and gain knowledge about their usefulness in colorectal cancer patients on clinical trial. This study is a Phase IIa clinical biomarker study, using oral aspirin 325 mg taken daily with an arginine-restricted diet designed to reduce arginine intake by at least 30% during the 12-week study period. The biomarkers will be obtained from patient by performing endoscopy (a procedure used to look at the inside of the bowel, rectum and colon) and biopsy (taking samples of tissue), phlebotomy (drawing blood), and urine collection. Biopsies are done to evaluate changes in tissue content that may relate to early events in colon cancer formation. This was the procedure used to diagnose your condition initially. There will be 24 patients enrolled into this study performed through University of California Irvine Medical Center.

    at UC Irvine

Last updated: