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Colorectal Cancer clinical trials at University of California Health

168 in progress, 94 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Beta-only IL-2 ImmunoTherapY Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1/2, multi-center, open-label, dose-escalation and expansion study to evaluate safety and tolerability, PK, pharmacodynamic, and early signal of anti-tumor activity of MDNA11 alone or in combination with a checkpoint inhibitor in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    at UCSF

  • KVA12123 Treatment Alone and in Combination With Pembrolizumab In Advanced Solid Tumors (VISTA-101)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this clinical trial is to test the safety and efficacy of KVA12123 alone or combined with pembrolizumab in patients with advanced solid tumors. The main questions this study aims to answer are: 1. What is the safety of KVA12123 when administered alone and in combination with pembrolizumab to advanced cancer patients? 2. What is an appropriate dose of KVA12123 to administer alone and in combination with pembrolizumab to advanced cancer patients in future clinical trials? Participants in this trial will be asked to: 1. Visit the clinical site every 1 - 2 weeks. 2. Receive KVA12123 every 2 weeks alone or in combination with pembrolizumab every 6 weeks. 3. Provide blood samples to evaluate drug levels in blood, drug safety and to explore the effects of each drug on the immune system. 4. Undergo scans every 6 weeks to test the effect of treatment on cancer progression. 5. Undergo other study procedures to evaluate drug safety and participant safety including physical exams, heart function tests, etc.

    at UCLA

  • SHP2 Inhibitor in Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring KRAS of EGFR Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 1 dose escalation study in patients with advanced solid tumors harboring KRAS or EGFR mutations to determine the maximum tolerated dose and recommended Phase II dose of HBI-2376 and characterize its pharmacokinetic profile.

    at UCLA

  • Different Doses of BI 765049 When Given Alone and When Given With Ezabenlimab to Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors Expressing the Protein B7-H6 on the Cell Surface

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is open to adults with advanced solid tumors whose previous cancer treatment was not successful. People can participate if their tumor has the B7-H6 marker or if they have colorectal cancer. The study tests 2 medicines called BI 765049 and ezabenlimab (BI 754091). Both medicines may help the immune system fight cancer. The purpose of this study is to find out the highest dose of BI 765049 alone and in combination with ezabenlimab the participants can tolerate. In this study, BI 765049 is given to people for the first time. Participants can stay in the study for up to 3 years, if they benefit from treatment and can tolerate it. During this time, they get BI 765049 alone or in combination with ezabenlimab as infusion into a vein every 3 weeks. The doctors check the health of the participants and note any health problems that could have been caused by BI 765049 or ezabenlimab. The doctors also regularly monitor the size of the tumor.

    at UC Irvine

  • Targeted Therapies in Subpopulations of Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (INTRINSIC)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This open-label, exploratory study is designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of targeted therapies or immunotherapy as single agents or combinations, in participants with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) whose tumors are biomarker positive as per treatment arm-specific definition. Eligible participants with mCRC will be enrolled into specific treatment arms based on their biomarker assay results.

    at UCLA

  • Amivantamab Monotherapy and in Addition to Standard-of-Care Chemotherapy in Participants With Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to assess the anti-tumor activity of amivantamab as a monotherapy (Cohorts A, B, and C), to characterize the safety of amivantamab when added to standard-of care (SoC) chemotherapy in participants with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) (Ph2 cohorts), and to assess the recommended phase 2 combination dose (RP2CD) of amivantamab when added to SoC chemotherapy (Ph1b cohorts).

    at UCLA

  • Bispecific Antibody MCLA-158 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1/2 open-label, multi-center, multi-national study with an initial dose escalation part to determine the RP2D of MCLA-158 single agent in patients with mCRC. The dose escalation part has been completed and the RP2D will be further evaluated in an expansion part of the study. Cohorts of selected solid tumor indications for which there is evidence of EGFR dependency and potential sensitivity to EGFR inhibition will be evaluated including head and neck cancer. The study will further assess the safety, tolerability, PK, PD, immunogenicity, and anti-tumor activity of MCLA-158.

    at UCSD

  • DCC-3116 in Combination With Anticancer Therapies in Participants With Advanced Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1/2, multicenter, open-label (unless otherwise specified in a combination-specific module) study of DCC-3116 in combination with anticancer therapies. Modules within the master protocol are defined according to different combinations of DCC-3116 with other anticancer agents.

    at UCLA

  • DSP107 Alone and in Combination With Atezolizumab for Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Part 1: A first-in-human, open-label, Phase I dose escalation study of DSP107 monotherapy and combination therapy with atezolizumab in patients with advanced solid tumors. Part 2: Preliminary efficacy assessment of DSP107 in combination with atezolizumab in second or third line treatment of non small cell lung cancer. Preliminary efficacy assessment of DSP107 as a single agent or in combination with atezolizumab in third line treatment of colorectal cancer.

    at UCSD

  • E7386 in Combination With Other Anticancer Drug in Participants With Solid Tumor

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the safety and tolerability and to determine the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of E7386 in combination with other anticancer drug(s).

    at UCLA UCSD

  • E7386 in Combination With Pembrolizumab in Previously Treated Participants With Selected Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The Phase 1b part of this study is conducted to assess the safety and tolerability of E7386 in combination with pembrolizumab in participants with previously treated selected solid tumors, and to determine the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of E7386 in combination with pembrolizumab. The Phase 2 part of this study is conducted to assess the objective response rate (ORR) of E7386 in combination with pembrolizumab (melanoma, colorectal cancer [CRC], hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC]) or of E7386 in combination with pembrolizumab plus lenvatinib (HCC) according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1.

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • ELI-002 7P in Subjects With KRAS/NRAS Mutated Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1/2 study to assess the safety and efficacy of ELI-002 7P immunotherapy (a lipid-conjugated immune-stimulatory oligonucleotide [Amph-CpG-7909] plus a mixture of lipid-conjugated peptide-based antigens [Amph-Peptides 7P]) as adjuvant treatment in subjects with solid tumors with mutated KRAS/NRAS. This study builds on the experience obtained with related product ELI-002 2P, which was studied in protocol ELI-002-001 under IND 26909.

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • NT-175 in Adult Subjects With Unresectable, Advanced, and/or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Are Positive for HLA-A*02:01 and the TP53 R175H Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Phase I Study of NT-175, an autologous T cell therapy product genetically engineered to express an HLA-A*02:01-restricted T cell receptor (TCR), targeting TP53 R175H mutant solid tumors.

    at UCLA

  • NX-1607 in Adults With Advanced Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a first-in-human Phase 1a/1b multicenter, open-label oncology study designed to evaluate the safety and anti-cancer activity of NX-1607 in patients with advanced malignancies.

    at UCSF

  • RGX-202-01 (Ompenaclid) as Combination Therapy in RAS Mutant Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1 study currently evaluating PO administered ompenaclid in combination with FOLFIRI and bevacizumab in patients with advanced (i.e., locally advanced and unresectable, or metastatic) previously treated colorectal adenocarcinoma. The single agent ompenaclid dose escalation stage and the ompenaclid in combination with FOLFIRI and bevacizumab dose escalation stage of the study has been completed; the expansion stage of ompenaclid in combination with FOLFIRI and bevacizumab is ongoing. In April-24 a protocol amendment added a new dose escalation and expansion stage which will evaluate ompenaclid in combination with FOLFOX and bevacizumab in patients with metastatic CRC. It is anticipated that a total of 30 patients will be enrolled in this new dose escalation and expansion stage of the study.

    at UCLA

  • Selpercatinib (LOXO-292) in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors, RET Fusion-Positive Solid Tumors, and Medullary Thyroid Cancer (LIBRETTO-001)

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This is an open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and preliminary anti-tumor activity of selpercatinib (also known as LOXO-292) administered orally to participants with advanced solid tumors, including rearranged during transfection (RET)-fusion-positive solid tumors, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and other tumors with RET activation.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • SGN-BB228 in Advanced Melanoma and Other Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will test the safety of a drug called SGN-BB228 in participants with melanoma and other solid tumors that are hard to treat or have spread through the body. It will also study the side effects of this drug. A side effect is anything a drug does to the body besides treating the disease. This study will have 3 parts. Parts A and B of the study will find out how much SGN-BB228 should be given to participants. Part C will use the information from Parts A and B to see if SGN-BB228 is safe and if it works to treat solid tumor cancers.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • SGN-EGFRd2 in Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will test the safety of a drug called SGN-EGFRd2 in participants with advanced solid tumors. It will also study the side effects of this drug. A side effect is anything a drug does to the body besides treating the disease. Participants will have cancer that cannot be removed (unresectable) or has spread through the body (metastatic). This study will have three parts. Parts A and B of the study will find out how much SGN-EGFRd2 should be given to participants. Part C will use the dose found in parts A and B to find out how safe SGN-EGFRd2 is and if it works to treat solid tumor cancers.

    at UCLA

  • TAK-186 (Also Known as MVC-101) in Adults With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The main aim of this study is to check for side effects and tolerability of TAK-186 (also known as MVC-101) in adults with unremovable advanced or metastatic cancer. Another aim is to characterize and evaluate the activity of TAK-186 (MVC-101). Participants may receive treatment throughout the study for a maximum of 13 months and will be followed up at 30 days and 90 days and then every 12 weeks for up to 48 weeks after the last treatment.

    at UCSF

  • TBio-4101 (TIL) and Pembrolizumab in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    A multicenter trial to investigate TBio-4101, an autologous, neoantigen-selected, tumor-reactive TIL product, in patients with advanced solid malignancies.

    at UC Irvine

  • PK and Efficacy of ONC-392 in Monotherapy and in Combination of Anti-PD-1 in Advanced Solid Tumors and NSCLC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a First-in-Human Phase IA/IB/II open label dose escalation study of intravenous (IV) administration of ONC-392, a humanized anti-CTLA4 IgG1 monoclonal antibody, as single agent and in combination with pembrolizumab in participants with advanced or metastatic solid tumors and non-small cell lung cancers.

    at UC Davis

  • A2B530, a Logic-gated CAR T, in Subjects With Solid Tumors That Express CEA and Have Lost HLA-A*02 Expression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this study is to test A2B530,an autologous logic-gated Tmod™ CAR T-cell product in subjects with solid tumors including colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic cancer (PANC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and other solid tumors that express CEA and have lost HLA-A*02 expression. The main questions this study aims to answer are: - Phase 1: What is the maximum or recommended dose of A2B530 that is safe for patients - Phase 2: Does the recommended dose of A2B530 kill the solid tumor cells and protect the patient's healthy cells Participants will be required to perform study procedures and assessments, and will also receive the following study treatments: - Enrollment and Apheresis in BASECAMP-1 (NCT04981119) - Preconditioning Lymphodepletion (PCLD) Regimen - A2B530 Tmod CAR T cells at the assigned dose

    at UCLA UCSD

  • A2B694, a Logic-gated CAR T, in Subjects With Solid Tumors That Express MSLN and Have Lost HLA-A*02 Expression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this study is to test A2B694, an autologous logic-gated Tmod™ CAR T-cell product in subjects with solid tumors including colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic cancer (PANC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), ovarian cancer (OVCA), mesothelioma (MESO), and other solid tumors that express MSLN and have lost HLA-A*02 expression. The main questions this study aims to answer are: Phase 1: What is the recommended dose of A2B694 that is safe for patients Phase 2: Does the recommended dose of A2B694 kill the solid tumor cells and protect the patient's healthy cells Participants will be required to perform study procedures and assessments, and will also receive the following study treatments: Enrollment and Apheresis in BASECAMP-1 (NCT04981119) Preconditioning Lymphodepletion (PCLD) Regimen A2B694 Tmod CAR T cells at the assigned dose

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Activity of GDC-6036 Alone or in Combination in Participants With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors With a KRAS G12C Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase I dose-escalation and dose-expansion study that will evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and preliminary activity of GDC-6036 in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors with a KRAS G12C mutation.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UCSF

  • LYL845 in Adults With Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This is an open-label, multi-center, dose-escalation study with expansion cohorts, designed to evaluate the safety and anti-tumor activity of LYL845, an epigenetically reprogrammed tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy, in participants with relapsed or refractory (R/R) metastatic or locally advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and colorectal cancer (CRC).

    at UC Davis UCLA

  • RSC-1255 for Treatment of Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    RSC-101 is a Phase 1a/1b clinical trial of RSC-1255 in adult study participants with advanced solid tumor malignancies who are intolerant of existing therapies known to provide clinical benefit, have disease that has progressed after standard therapy, or have previously failed other therapies. The study has two phases. The purpose of Phase 1a (Dose Escalation) is to confirm the appropriate treatment dose and Phase 1b (Dose Expansion) is to characterize the safety and efficacy of RSC-1255.

    at UC Davis UCLA

  • BXQ-350 in Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The study will assess the safety and efficacy of BXQ-350 plus modified FOLFOX7 (mFOLFOX7) and bevacizumab in participants who have newly diagnosed metastatic adenocarcinoma of the colon/rectum. The study will also evaluate if the administration of BXQ-350 with mFOLFOX7 and bevacizumab may diminish oxaliplatin induced sensory neurotoxicity, enabling participants to receive the total and planned doses of mFOLFOX7. All participants will receive BXQ-350 by intravenous (IV) infusion along with standard of care doses of mFOLFOX and bevacizumab. The study is divided into two stages: Stage 1 will be open label and will enroll participants at increasing dose levels of BXQ-350 in order to determine the Stage 2 dose. Stage 2 will be blinded; participants will receive BXQ-350 at the established Stage 1 dose or placebo.

    at UC Irvine

  • Colon Adjuvant Chemotherapy Based on Evaluation of Residual Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This Phase II/III trial will evaluate the what kind of chemotherapy to recommend to patients based on the presence or absences of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) after surgery for colon cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Dose Expansion Study of RMC-6291 Monotherapy in Subjects With Advanced KRASG12C Mutant Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of escalating doses of RMC-6291 (KRAS G12C(ON) inhibitor) monotherapy in adult subjects with advanced solid tumors and to identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and the recommended Phase 2 dose.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSF

  • Duloxetine to Prevent Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage II-III Colorectal Cancer

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 25 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies the best dose of duloxetine and how well it works in preventing pain, tingling, and numbness (peripheral neuropathy) caused by treatment with oxaliplatin in patients with stage II-III colorectal cancer. Duloxetine increases the amount of certain chemicals in the brain that help relieve depression and pain. Giving duloxetine in patients undergoing treatment with oxaliplatin for colorectal cancer may help prevent peripheral neuropathy.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • EA2176: Phase 3 Clinical Trial of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel +/- Nivolumab in Metastatic Anal Cancer Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase 3 trial compares the addition of nivolumab to chemotherapy (carboplatin and paclitaxel) versus usual treatment (chemotherapy alone) for the treatment of anal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab together with carboplatin and paclitaxel may help doctors find out if the treatment is better or the same as the usual approach.

    at UC Irvine

  • SINGLE PORT (SP) Robotic Technology in Colorectal Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Currently a multiport robotic surgery platform (Intuitive Xi) is widely available and used for colorectal surgery indications. A Single port platform (Intuitive SP) is FDA approved for Head and Neck and Urology but has not been widely used in colorectal surgery. This study seeks to evaluate the safe and effective use of the SP platform for colorectal surgery indications.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Experimental PET Imaging Scans Before Cancer Surgery to Study the Amount of PET Tracer Accumulated in Normal and Cancer Tissues

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies a new imaging technique called FAPi PET/CT to determine where and to which degree the FAPI tracer (68Ga-FAPi-46) accumulate in normal and cancer tissues in patients with non-prostate cancer. The research team also want to know whether what they see on PET/CT images represents the tumor tissue being excised from the patient's body. The research team is also interested to investigate another new imaging technique called PSMA PET/CT. Participants will be invited to undergo another PET/CT scan, with the PSMA tracer (68Ga-PSMA-11). This is not required but just an option for volunteer patients. Patients who have not received an 18F-FDG PET/CT within one month of enrollment will also undergo an FDG PET/CT scan. The PET/CT scanner combines the PET and the CT scanners into a single device. This device combines the anatomic (body structure) information provided by the CT scan with the metabolic information obtained from the PET scan. PET is an established imaging technique that utilizes small amounts of radioactivity attached to very minimal amounts of, in the case of this research, 68Ga-PSMA-11 and 68Ga-FAPi, and 18F-FDG (if applicable). Because some cancers take up 68Ga-PSMA-11 and/or 68Ga-FAPi it can be seen with PET. CT utilizes x-rays that traverse the body from the outside. CT images provide an exact outline of organs where it occurs in patient's body. FAP stands for Fibroblast Activation Protein. FAP is produced by cells that surround tumors. The function of FAP is not well understood but imaging studies have shown that FAP can be detected with FAPI PET/CT. Imaging FAP with FAPI PET/CT may in the future provide additional information about various cancers. PSMA stands for Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen. This name is incorrect as PSMA is also found in many other cancers. The function of PSMA is not well understood but imaging studies have shown that PSMA can be detected with PET in many non-prostate cancers. Imaging FAP with PET/CT may in the future provide additional information about various cancers.

    at UCLA

  • First in Human Study of TORL-3-600 in Participants With Advanced Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This first-in-human study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of TORL-3-600 in patients with advanced cancer

    at UCLA

  • Five or Ten Year Colonoscopy for 1-2 Non-Advanced Adenomatous Polyps

    open to eligible people ages 50-70

    This trial examines colorectal cancer incidence in participants with 1 to 2 non-advanced adenomas randomized to surveillance colonoscopy at 10 years compared to participants randomized to surveillance colonoscopy at 5 and 10 years.

    at UCLA

  • GCC19CART for Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Study ICT-GCC19CART-US-001 (CARAPIA-1) is a Phase 1 study evaluating the safety, tolerability, clinical activity, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of GCC19CART in subjects with relapsed or refractory metastatic colorectal cancer.

    at UCSF

  • GEN1042 Safety Trial and Anti-tumor Activity in Subjects With Malignant Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    To evaluate the safety and anti-tumor activity of GEN1042 in patients with metastatic or locally advanced solid tumors.

    at UCSD

  • Geriatric Assessment and Promotores (GAP) Pilot Feasibility Study

    open to eligible people ages 65-90

    The goal of this clinical trial is to test a new way to help older adults who have had cancer. The researchers want to see if a program that assesses participants health and aging is achievable and makes a difference. A community health worker/promotora de salud will assess their health and provide coaching to help them feel better. This is important because older adults with cancer often have other health issues that are not addressed after completing treatment. The researchers want to make sure they get the care they need.

    at UC Davis

  • Glycan Mediated Immune Regulation With a Bi-Sialidase Fusion Protein (GLIMMER-01)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1/2, first-in-human, open-label, dose escalation and dose-expansion study of E-602, administered alone and in combination with cemiplimab.

    at UCSD

  • Implementation Research to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates Among Low Income and Ethnic Minority Groups

    open to eligible people ages 50-75

    This clinical trial implements research strategies to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates among low income and ethnic minority groups. CRC is the second most common cause of cancer mortality in the United States and disproportionately burdens low income and ethnic minority groups. Fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) is a test to check for blood in the stool. A brush is used to collect water drops from around the surface of a stool while it is still in the toilet bowl. The samples are then sent to a laboratory, where they are checked for a human blood protein. Blood in the stool may be a sign of colorectal cancer. Despite its potential for reducing CRC incidence and mortality, screening remains woefully underutilized. There is an unmet need for practical and effective programs to improve CRC screening rates. By implementing a culturally-tailored screening CRC program that supports providers and clinic staff to encourage eligible patients to complete FIT, researchers hope to reduce cancer disparities among low-income and ethnic groups and increase the CRC screening rate, which will help providers find CRC sooner, when it may be easier to treat.

    at UCLA

  • Improving Adolescent and Young Adult Self-Reported Data in ECOG-ACRIN Trials

    open to eligible people ages 18-39

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate feasibility and acceptability of completing PROs among AYAs randomized to Choice PRO vs Fixed PRO.

    at UC Davis

  • Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity for Cancer Survivors (Tools To Be Fit)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the effect of four different intervention components "tools" on body weight, nutrition, and physical activity in cancer survivors. Studies indicate that people with a history of cancer whose nutrition and physical activity habits are consistent with the American Cancer Society's Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines may have longer disease-free survival. The four different intervention components may help patients with a history of cancer adopt recommended health behaviors after they have completed treatment.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Interactive Survivorship Program for the Improvement of Healthcare Resources in Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors, INSPIRE-AYA Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial studies how well an interactive survivorship program works in improving healthcare resources in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors. By improving access to survivorship resources, health literacy, self-management skills, and support, an interactive survivorship program may help to improve adherence to adolescent and young adult healthcare guidelines and reduce cancer-related distress.

    at UCLA

  • Interventional Study of INCB 99280 With Ipilimumab in Participants With Select Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the safety, tolerability, PK, and efficacy of INCB 99280 in combination with ipilimumab in participants with select solid tumors.

    at UC Irvine

  • Intraperitoneal LSTA1 in CRS-HIPEC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This Study is designed to test an investigational product (IP) called LSTA1 (Study drug). LSTA1 is a drug designed to improve the delivery of anti-cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy. Improved delivery of chemotherapy may result in improved anti-cancer effects when given with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in patients with peritoneal metastases. Participants will be randomized to receive LSTA1 with HIPEC or HIPEC alone (without LSTA1) at the time of surgery.

    at UCSD

  • KO-2806 Monotherapy and Combination Therapies in Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This first-in-human (FIH) dose-escalation and dose-validation/expansion study will assess KO-2806, a farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI), as a monotherapy and in combination, in adult patients with advanced solid tumors.

    at UCLA

  • Locally ablatIVe thErapy for oLigo-progressive gastrOintestiNal maliGnancies (LIVELONG)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 2 pragmatic study that evaluates the clinical benefit of continuing systemic therapy with the addition of locally ablative therapies for oligo-progressive solid tumors as the primary objective. The primary outcome measure is the time to treatment failure (defined as time to change in systemic failure or permanent discontinuation of therapy) following locally ablative therapy.

    at UC Davis

  • Lower-Dose Chemoradiation in Treating Patients With Early-Stage Anal Cancer, the DECREASE Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well lower-dose chemotherapy plus radiation (chemoradiation) therapy works in comparison to standard-dose chemoradiation in treating patients with early-stage anal cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin, fluorouracil, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. This study may help doctors find out if lower-dose chemoradiation is as effective and has fewer side effects than standard-dose chemoradiation, which is the usual approach for treatment of this cancer type.

    at UC Irvine UCSD

  • LUT014 for the Reduction of Dose-Limiting Acneiform Lesions Associated With EGFRI Treatment of mCRC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The study evaluates the efficacy and safety of two strengths of LUT014 Gel topically applied once a day for 4 weeks, compared to placebo, in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients who developed Grade 2 or non-infected Grade 3 EGFRI induced acneiform lesions

    at UCLA

  • LYT-200 Alone and in Combination With Chemotherapy or Tislelizumab in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 1/2 Open-label, Multi-center Study of the Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Anti-tumor Activity of LYT-200 Alone and in Combination with Chemotherapy or Tislelizumab in Patients with Metastatic Solid Tumors

    at UCLA

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With HIV Associated Relapsed or Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma or Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab when given with ipilimumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory), or solid tumors that have spread from where it first started to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Ipilimumab is an antibody that acts against a molecule called cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). CTLA-4 controls a part of the immune system by shutting it down. Nivolumab is a type of antibody that is specific for human programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), a protein that is responsible for destruction of immune cells. Giving ipilimumab with nivolumab may work better in treating patients with HIV associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma or solid tumors compared to ipilimumab with nivolumab alone.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Optimization of Adaptive Text Messages for Cancer Survivors (OATS II)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial evaluates whether an adaptive text-message intervention is useful in helping survivors of colorectal cancers (CRC) eat more whole grain foods and less refined grain foods. Most CRC survivors don't achieve the recommended intakes of whole grains or fiber, even though there is strong evidence that a high-fiber diet rich in whole grains lowers the risk of death from CRC. Dietary interventions are a promising approach for reducing death from CRC, and text message interventions specifically are a promising tool for reaching diverse populations. This trial evaluates a text-message based dietary intervention that continuously adapts message content to be specifically tailored for the participant for increasing whole grain consumption.

    at UCSF

  • P-MUC1C-ALLO1 Allogeneic CAR-T Cells in the Treatment of Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 1, open label, dose escalation and expanded cohort study of P-MUC1C-ALLO1 in adult subjects with advanced or metastatic epithelial derived solid tumors, including but not limited to the tumor types listed below.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Pembrolizumab Plus Lenvatinib in Combination With Belzutifan in Solid Tumors (MK-6482-016)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of belzutifan in combination with pembrolizumab and lenvatinib in multiple solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), biliary tract cancer (BTC), endometrial cancer (EC),and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). There is no formal hypothesis testing in this study.

    at UCSF

  • Performance of SGM-101 for the Delineation of Primary and Recurrent Tumor and Metastases in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The performance of SGM-101, an intraoperative imaging agent, will be compared to that of standard "white light" visualization during surgical resections of colorectal cancer.

    at UCSD

  • INBRX-109 in Subjects With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors Including Sarcomas

    open to eligible people ages 12-85

    This is a first-in-human, open-label, non-randomized, three-part phase 1 trial of INBRX-109, which is a recombinant humanized tetravalent antibody targeting the human death receptor 5 (DR5).

    at UCSD

  • First-in-human, Dose-finding and Expansion Study to Evaluate XmAb®808 in Combination With Pembrolizumab in Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of intravenous (IV) administration of XmAb808 in combination with pembrolizumab in subjects with selected advanced solid tumors and to identify the minimum safe and biologically effective/recommended dose (RD) and schedule for XmAb808.

    at UCLA

  • Aplitabart (IGM-8444) Alone or in Combination in Participants With Relapsed, Refractory, or Newly Diagnosed Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is a first-in-human, Phase 1a/1b, multicenter, open-label study to determine the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of aplitabart as a single agent and in combination in participants with relapsed and/or refractory solid or hematologic cancers, as well as newly diagnosed cancers, and an open-label, randomized study of aplitabart+FOLFIRI+bevacizumab.

    at UC Irvine UCLA UCSF

  • DKN-01 in Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 2 randomized, open-label, two-part, multicenter study with a safety run-in to evaluate efficacy and safety of DKN-01 plus FOLFIRI/FOLFOX and bevacizumab versus standard of care (SOC) [FOLFIRI/FOLFOX and bevacizumab] as second-line treatment of advanced CRC patients.

    at UCLA

  • Autologous CD8+ and CD4+ Engineered T Cell Receptor T Cells in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is open to adult patients with solid tumors who have a KRAS G12V mutation. This mutation is often found in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and other cancers. The study is for patients whose cancer has spread through the body and for whom previous treatments were not successful or treatment does not exist. Patients must also be positive for HLA-A*11:01. The purpose of this study is to find the best dose of AFNT-211 that is safe and can shrink tumors in patients. AFNT-211 is an investigational therapy and this is the first time that AFNT-211 is being administered to patients. AFNT-211 is an autologous T cell product which means that it is made from a patient's own T cells. These cells are engineered and grown to recognize the KRAS G12V protein on the cell surface of cancer cells. AFNT-211 is infused into patients after a short course of lymphodepleting chemotherapy. Patients will frequently visit the study site. The doctors there will regularly check the size of the cancer and the patient's health. They will also take note of any unwanted effects. Patients may continue in this study for as long as they benefit from the treatment.

    at UCLA

  • PrehabPal: A Digital Tool to Help Older Adults Prepare for Cancer Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 65 years and up

    This is a multi-center, randomized trial investigating the use of PrehabPal web app versus a written surgery prehabilitation instructions among individuals aged 65 years and older preparing for colon cancer surgery. PrehabPal is a web app designed with, and for, older adults preparing for surgery at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). This app has the potential to fill a crucial clinical gap for older cancer patients by designing an individualized prehabilitation program and providing prehabilitation coaching.

    at UCSF

  • Preoperative Immunotherapy (Pembrolizumab) for Patients With Colorectal Cancer and Resectable Hepatic Metastases

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trials studies how well pembrolizumab and vactosertib work after standard of care chemotherapy in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver that can be removed by surgery (resectable hepatic metastases). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vactosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and vactosertib after standard of care chemotherapy, but before liver metastases surgery, may help shrink the cancer prior to surgery. This study also investigates pembrolizumab and vactosertib after liver metastases surgery, decrease the risk of the cancer recurring (coming back).

    at UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Metastatic Gastrointestinal Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy works for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer that are spreading to other places in the body (metastatic). Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. This trial is being done to determine if giving radiation therapy to patients who are being treated with immunotherapy and whose cancers are progressing (getting worse) can slow or stop the growth of their cancers. It may also help researchers determine if giving radiation therapy to one tumor can stimulate the immune system to attack other tumors in the body that are not targeted by the radiation therapy.

    at UCSF

  • Short Course Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial investigates how well short-course radiation therapy followed by combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with stage II-III rectal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as leucovorin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving short-course radiation therapy and combination chemotherapy may reduce the need for surgery and therefore improve quality of life.

    at UCLA

  • [18F]FAPI-74 PET in Patients With Gastrointestinal Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Prospective, multi-center, open label, non-randomized clinical trial to assess efficacy of [18F]FAPI-74 to detect FAP expressing cells in patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, gastric, pancreatic and colorectal cancer. The [18F]FAPI-74 PET scan will be acquired in patients with proven GI cancers after initial staging using institutional standard methods. The PET scan results will be compared to FAP immunohistochemistry (as the primary objective) and histopathology (as the secondary objective) of the biopsied or resected tissues.

    at UCLA

  • Covalent Menin Inhibitor BMF-219 in Adult Patients With KRAS Driven Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, and Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 1/1b dose finding study to determine the OBD(s) and RP2D(s) of BMF-219, a covalent menin inhibitor small molecule, in subjects with KRAS mutated unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic NSCLC (Cohort 1), PDAC (Cohort 2), and CRC (Cohort 3).

    at UCSD

  • CRX100 as Monotherapy and in Combination With Pembrolizumab in Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical study is an open-label, Phase 1, dose-escalation study to determine the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of the drug product produced by Administering CRX100 alone and in combination with Pembrolizumab in advanced solid malignancies. Patients will be screened and evaluated to determine whether or not they meet stated inclusion criteria. Enrolled subjects will undergo leukapheresis to enable the ex vivo generation of CRX100. Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), ovarian cancer, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), malignant melanoma (excluding uveal melanoma), gastric cancer, triple negative breast cancer, and osteosarcoma. The study will start with monotherapy dose escalation followed by combination cohorts.

    at UCSD

  • ctDNA Guided Change in Tx for Refractory Minimal Residual Disease in Colon Adenocarcinomas

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 1b, prospective, single arm, non-randomized, open-label clinical trial determining the efficacy of adjuvant trifluridine and tipiracil (TAS-102) in combination with irinotecan in patients with ctDNA positive colon adenocarcinoma.

    at UC Irvine

  • HRO761 Alone or in Combination in Cancer Patients With Specific DNA Alterations Called Microsatellite Instability or Mismatch Repair Deficiency.

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The main purpose of the study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of HRO761 and identify the recommended dose(s), i.e., the optimal safe and active dose of HRO761 alone or in combination with tislelizumab or irinotecan that can be given to patients who have cancers with specific molecular alterations called MSIhi (Microsatellite Instability-high) or dMMR (Mismatch Repair Deficient) that might work best to treat these specific cancer types and to understand how well HRO761 is able to treat those cancers.

    at UCLA

  • IDE196 in Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring GNAQ/11 Mutations or PRKC Fusions

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1/2, multi-center, open-label basket study designed to evaluate the safety and anti-tumor activity of IDE196 in patients with solid tumors harboring GNAQ or GNA11 (GNAQ/11) mutations or PRKC fusions, including metastatic uveal melanoma (MUM), cutaneous melanoma, colorectal cancer, and other solid tumors. Phase 1 (dose escalation - monotherapy) will assess safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of IDE196 via standard dose escalation scheme and determine the recommended Phase 2 dose. Safety and anti-tumor activity will be assessed in the Phase 2 (dose expansion) part of the study. Phase 1 Tablet and Food Effect Pharmacokinetic (PK) Substudy will assess the PK profile of IDE196 tablet and evaluate the effects of food on the PK profile of IDE196 tablet Phase 1 (dose escalation - binimetib combination) will assess safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of IDE196 and binimetinib via standard dose escalation scheme and determine the recommended Phase 2 dose. Safety and anti-tumor activity will be assessed in the Phase 2 (dose expansion) part of the study. Phase 1 (dose escalation - crizotinib combination) will assess safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of IDE196 and crizotinib via standard dose escalation scheme and determine the recommended Phase 2 dose. Safety and anti-tumor activity will be assessed in the Phase 2 (dose expansion) part of the study. Evaluation of safety and efficacy across multiple doses may be explored in the dose optimization part of the study. Crizotinib monotherapy with crossover to combination cohort may be assessed for safety and to show the contribution of each study drug to anti-tumor activity.

    at UCLA

  • JANX008 in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18-100

    This study is a first-in-human (FIH), Phase 1/1b, open-label, multicenter dose escalation and dose expansion study to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary anti-tumor activity of JANX008 in adult subjects with advanced or metastatic carcinoma expressing EGFR.

    at UCSD

  • NGM707 as Monotherapy and in Combination With Pembrolizumab in Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Study of NGM707 as Monotherapy and in Combination with Pembrolizumab in Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor Malignancies

    at UCLA

  • RMC-6236 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors Harboring Specific Mutations in RAS

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Evaluate the safety and tolerability of RMC-6236 in adults with specific RAS mutant advanced solid tumors.

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • RMC-6291 in Combination With RMC-6236 in Participants With Advanced KRAS G12C Mutant Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18-125

    This study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and PK profiles of RMC-6291 and RMC-6236 in adults with KRAS G12C-mutated solid tumors.

    at UC Davis

  • BCA101 Monotherapy and in Combination Therapy in Patients With EGFR-driven Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The investigational drug to be studied in this protocol, BCA101, is a first-in-class compound that targets both EGFR with TGFβ. Based on preclinical data, this bifunctional antibody may exert synergistic activity in patients with EGFR-driven tumors.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • XL092 + Atezolizumab vs Regorafenib in Subjects With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, controlled Phase 3 trial of XL092 + atezolizumab vs regorafenib in subjects with microsatellite stable/microsatellite instability low (MSS/MSI-low) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who have progressed during, after or are intolerant to standard-of-care (SOC) therapy.

    at UCLA

  • Adverse Events and Change in Disease Activity in Adult Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors Receiving Intravenous (IV) ABBV-400 as Monotherapy and in Combination With IV Bevacizumab

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Cancer is a condition where cells in a specific part of body grow and reproduce uncontrollably. The purpose of this study is to assess adverse events and change in disease activity when ABBV-400 is given to adult participants to treat advanced solid tumors. ABBV-400 is an investigational drug being developed for the treatment of advanced solid tumors. Study doctors put the participants in groups called treatment arms. The Recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) will be explored. Each treatment arm receives a different dose of ABBV-400. This study will include a dose escalation phase to determine the best dose of ABBV-400, followed by a dose expansion phase to confirm the dose and combination with bevacizumab. Approximately 500 adult participants with NSCLC, gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma/gastroesophagel junction adenocarcinoma (GEA) and colorectal cancer (CRC) or advanced solid tumors, will be enrolled in the study in approximately 7-10 sites in the Dose Escalation phase and 85-95 sites in the Dose Expansion phase worldwide. Dose escalation arms, participants will receive intravenous (IV) escalating doses of ABBV-400 monotherapy. Dose expansion arms, participants in the following advanced solid tumor indications: non-squamous NSCLC with wildtype EGFR-expression (wtEGFR NSCLC) [Part 2i] or mutated EGFR-expression (mutEGFR NSCLC) [Part 2ii], squamous NSCLC [Part 2iii], GEA [Part 3] will receive intravenous (IV) ABBV-400 monotherapy, participants CRC will receive IV ABBV-400 monotherapy in expansion [Part 4], participants MET amplification will receive IV ABBV-400 monotherapy in expansion [Part 5], participants MET mutation will receive IV ABBV-400 monotherapy in expansion [Part 6], participants CRC safety lead in will receive escalating doses of IV ABBV-400 in combination with IV bevacizumab [Part 7a], and participants CRC dose optimization in will the low or high dose of IV ABBV-400 determined in Part 7a in combination with IV bevacizumab or oral trifluridine/tipiracil (TAS-102) tablets [Part 7b]. There may be higher treatment burden for participants in this trial compared to their standard of care. Participants will attend regular visits during the study at an approved institution (hospital or clinic). The effect of the treatment will be frequently checked by medical assessments, blood tests, questionnaires and side effects.

    at UCLA

  • TATE and Pembrolizumab (MK3475) in mCRC and NSCLC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer or non-small cell lung cancer with liver metastasis treated with Trans-arterial Tirapazamine Embolization along with Pembrolizumab.

    at UC Irvine

  • Tegavivint for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Including Lymphomas and Desmoid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 30 years

    This phase I/II trial evaluates the highest safe dose, side effects, and possible benefits of tegavivint in treating patients with solid tumors that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Tegavivint interferes with the binding of beta-catenin to TBL1, which may help stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking the signals passed from one molecule to another inside a cell that tell a cell to grow.

    at UCSF

  • Testing a Combination of Vaccines for Cancer Prevention in Lynch Syndrome

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase IIb trial tests whether Tri-Ad5 in combination with N-803 works to prevent colon and other cancers in participants with Lynch syndrome. Each of the three injections in Tri-Ad5 vaccine contain a different substance that is in precancer and cancer cells. Injecting these substances may cause the immune system to develop a defense against cancer that recognizes and destroys any precancer and cancer cells that produce these proteins in the future. N-803 may increase immune responses to other vaccines. Giving Tri-Ad5 in combination with immune enhancing N-803 may lower the chance of developing colon and other cancers in participants with Lynch syndrome.

    at UCSF

  • Anti-Cancer Drug, Irinotecan, to the Standard Chemotherapy Treatment (FOLFOX) After Long-Course Radiation Therapy for Advanced-Stage Rectal Cancers to Improve the Rate of Complete Response and Long-Term Rates of Organ Preservation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial compares the effect of irinotecan versus oxaliplatin after long-course chemoradiation in patients with stage II-III rectal cancer. Combination chemotherapy drugs, such as FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, irinotecan, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin), FOLFOX (leucovorin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan ), and CAPOX (capecitabin and oxaliplatin) work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. FOLFOX or CAPOX are used after chemoradiation as usual treatment for rectal cancer. Giving FOLFIRINOX after chemoradiation may increase the response rate and lead to higher rates of clinical complete response (with a chance of avoiding surgery) compared to FOLFOX or CAPOX after chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Anti-Cancer Drug, ZEN003694, to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Capecitabine) for Metastatic or Unresectable Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial tests the safety, side effects, and best dose of ZEN003694 in combination with the usual treatment with capecitabine in treating patients with cancer that has spread from where it first started (primary site) to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and that it has progressed on previous standard treatment. ZEN003694 is an inhibitor of a family of proteins called the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET). It may prevent the growth of tumor cells that over produce BET protein. Capecitabine is in a class of medications called antimetabolites. It is taken up by cancer cells and breaks down into fluorouracil, a substance that kills cancer cells. Giving ZEN003694 in combination with capecitabine may be safe in treating patients with metastatic or unresectable solid tumors.

    at UC Irvine

  • Total Ablative Therapy to Usual Systemic Therapy Treatment for Limited Metastatic Colorectal Cancer, The ERASur Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial compares total ablative therapy and usual systemic therapy to usual systemic therapy alone in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to up to 4 body sites (limited metastatic). The usual approach for patients who are not participating in a study is treatment with intravenous (IV) (through a vein) and/or oral medications (systemic therapy) to help stop the cancer sites from getting larger and the spread of the cancer to additional body sites. Ablative means that the intention of the local treatment is to eliminate the cancer at that metastatic site. The ablative local therapy will consist of very focused, intensive radiotherapy called stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with or without surgical resection and/or microwave ablation, which is a procedure where a needle is temporarily inserted in the tumor and heat is used to destroy the cancer cells. SABR, surgical resection, and microwave ablation have been tested for safety, but it is not scientifically proven that the addition of these treatments are beneficial for your stage of cancer. The addition of ablative local therapy to all known metastatic sites to the usual approach of systemic therapy could shrink or remove the tumor(s) or prevent the tumor(s) from returning.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Testing the Combination of the Anti-Cancer Drugs Temozolomide and M1774 to Evaluate Their Safety and Effectiveness

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of temozolomide and M1774 and how well they works in treating patients with cancer that has spread from where it first started (primary site) to other places in the body (metastatic) and may have spread to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced). Temozolomide is in a class of medications called alkylating agents. It works by damaging the cell's deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and may kill tumor cells and slow down or stop tumor growth. M1774 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Adding M1774 to temozolomide may shrink or stabilize cancer for longer than temozolomide alone.

    at UCSD

  • Testing the Combination of Two Anti-cancer Drugs, DS-8201a and AZD6738, for The Treatment of Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors Expressing the HER2 Protein or Gene, The DASH Trial

    “Volunteer for the DASH Trial and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The dose escalation phase of this trial identifies the best dose and safety of ceralasertib (AZD6738) when given in combination with trastuzumab deruxtecan (DS-8201a) in treating patients with solid tumors that have a change (mutation) in the HER2 gene or protein and have spread to other places in the body (advanced). The dose expansion phase (phase Ib) of this trial compares how colorectal and gastroesophageal cancers with HER2 mutation respond to treatment with a combination of ceralasertib and trastuzumab deruxtecan versus trastuzumab deruxtecan alone. Trastuzumab deruxtecan is a monoclonal antibody, called trastuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug, called deruxtecan. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers deruxtecan to kill them. Ceralasertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Immune Effects of Fermented Wheat Germ Nutritional Supplementation in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumor Cancers Being Treated With Standard of Care Checkpoint Inhibitors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I clinical trial tests the immune effects of fermented wheat germ in patients with advanced solid tumor cancers who are being treated with standard of care checkpoint inhibitors. Fermented wheat germ is a nutritional supplement that some claim is a "dietary food for special medical purposes for cancer patients" to support them in treatment. There have also been claims that fermented wheat germ is "clinically proven" and "recognized by medical experts" to "enhance oncological treatment" and boost immune response to cancer; however, there are currently no documented therapeutic effects of fermented wheat germ as a nutritional supplement. Checkpoint inhibitors, given as part of standard of care for advanced solid tumors, are a type of immunotherapy that may help the body's immune system attack the cancer and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The information gained from this trial may allow researchers to determine if there is any value of giving fermented wheat germ with standard of care checkpoint inhibitors for patients with advanced solid tumor malignancies.

    at UC Davis

  • Therapy Adapted for High Risk and Low Risk HIV-Associated Anal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of chemotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treating patients with low-risk HIV-associated anal cancer, and nivolumab after standard of care chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with high-risk HIV-associated anal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as mitomycin, fluorouracil, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nivolumab after standard of care chemotherapy and radiation therapy may help reduce the risk of the tumor coming back.

    at UCSF

  • Collecting Blood and Tissue Sample Donations for Research for HIV/AIDS-Related Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study collects blood and tissue samples for research of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related cancers. Collecting blood and tissue samples and studying biomarkers in the laboratory may help doctors to learn how are biologic or genetic factors related to HIV and cancers that occur commonly in people living with HIV.

    at UCSF

  • Collecting Blood Samples From Patients With and Without Cancer to Evaluate Tests for Early Cancer Detection

    open to eligible people ages 40-75

    This study collects blood and tissue samples from patients with cancer and without cancer to evaluate tests for early cancer detection. Collecting and storing samples of blood and tissue from patients with and without cancer to study in the laboratory may help researchers develop tests for the early detection of cancers.

    at UC Davis

  • Colorectal Cancer Screening in Cystic Fibrosis

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This multi-center study will compare multi-target DNA and quantitative FIT stool-based testing to colonoscopy in individuals with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) undergoing colon cancer screening with colonoscopy. The primary endpoint is detection of any adenomas, including advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer (CRC).

    at UCLA

  • Early Detection of Advanced Adenomas and Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study aims to develop a highly sensitive, specific, and cost-effective blood assay for early detection of colorectal adenomas and cancer, using advanced machine learning and state-of-the-art biological analyses.

    at UCSD

  • Solid Tumor Analysis for HLA Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) and Apheresis for CAR T- Cell Manufacturing

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Objective: To collect information on how often a solid tumor cancer might lose the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) by next generation sequencing and perform apheresis to collect and store an eligible participant's own T cells for future use to make CAR T-Cell therapy for their disease treatment. Design: This is a non-interventional, observational study to evaluate participants with solid tumors with a high risk of relapse for incurable disease. No interventional therapy will be administered on this study. Some of the information regarding the participant's tumor analysis may be beneficial to management of their disease. Participants that meet all criteria may be enrolled and leukapheresed (blood cells collected). The participant's cells will be processed and stored for potential manufacture of CAR T-cell therapy upon relapse of their cancer.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Surveillance Colonoscopy in Older Adults: The SurvOlderAdults Study

    open to eligible people ages 75 years and up

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death. Detection and removal of polyps can reduce risk for developing colorectal cancer. After finding and removing precancerous polyps, repeat colonoscopy is routinely recommended. However, it is unclear whether repeat additional colonoscopy further reduces risk for colorectal cancer. For older adults age 75 and older, the lack of this information is especially important, given that the risks of colonoscopy go up with age. This research will evaluate whether older adults with a prior history of precancerous polyps have higher colorectal cancer risks compared to older adults who had a prior normal colonoscopy, and whether, among those with prior precancerous polyps, repeating a colonoscopy after age 75 is associated with reduced cancer risk. The investigators will synthesize these data and gather perspectives from Veterans and clinical stakeholders to make recommendations on whether older adults with a prior history of polyps should continue or defer colonoscopy after age 75.

    at UCSD

  • Screening Tool to Describe HIV-Related Cancer Burden and Patient Characteristics in the AMC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is being done to understand how many people with HIV (PWH) present for cancer care across the AIDS Malignancy Consortium in the United States and if there are reasons that some PWH choose to participate, or not in cancer clinical trials. Optional quality of life surveys will be used to learn more about how HIV and cancer and HIV and cancer treatment affect people.

    at UCSD

  • 9-ING-41 in Patients With Advanced Cancers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    GSK-3β is a potentially important therapeutic target in human malignancies. The Actuate 1801 Phase 1/2 study is designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 9-ING-41, a potent GSK-3β inhibitor, as a single agent and in combination with cytotoxic agents, in patients with refractory cancers.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • Pegilodecakin (LY3500518) in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a first-in-human, open-label, dose escalation study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of pegilodecakin in participants with advanced solid tumors, dosed daily subcutaneously as a monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy or immunotherapy.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • TC-510 In Patients With Advanced Mesothelin-Expressing Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    TC-510 is a novel cell therapy that consists of autologous genetically engineered T cells expressing two synthetic constructs: first, a single-domain antibody that recognizes human Mesothelin, fused to the CD3-epsilon subunit which, upon expression, is incorporated into the endogenous T cell receptor (TCR) complex and second, a PD-1:CD28 switch receptor, which is expressed on the surface of the T cell, independently from the TCR. The PD-1:CD28 switch receptor comprises the PD-1 extracellular domain fused to the CD28 intracellular domain via a transmembrane domain. Thus, the switch is designed to produce a costimulatory signal upon engagement with PD-L1 on cancer cells.

    at UCSF

  • Patient-Specific Neoantigen Vaccine in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Blockade for Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective of the Phase 2 portion of the study is to characterize the clinical activity of maintenance therapy with GRT-C901/GRT-R902 (patient-specific vaccines) in combination with checkpoint inhibitors in addition to fluoropyrimidine/bevacizumab versus a fluoropyrimidine/bevacizumab alone as assessed by molecular response which is based on changes in circulating tumor (ct)DNA. The primary objective of the Phase 3 portion is to demonstrate clinical efficacy of the regimen as assessed by progression-free survival.

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • Autogene Cevumeran (RO7198457) as a Single Agent and in Combination With Atezolizumab in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1a/1b, open-label, multicenter, global, dose-escalation study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immune response, and pharmacokinetics of autogene cevumeran (RO7198457) as a single agent and in combination with atezolizumab (MPDL3280A, an engineered anti-programmed death-ligand 1 [anti-PD-L1] antibody).

    at UCSF

  • ELI-002 in Subjects With KRAS Mutated Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and Other Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1 study to assess the safety and efficacy of ELI-002 immunotherapy (a lipid-conjugated immune-stimulatory oligonucleotide [Amph-CpG-7909] plus a mixture of lipid-conjugated peptide-based antigens [Amph-Peptides]) as adjuvant treatment of minimal residual disease (MRD) in subjects with KRAS/neuroblastoma ras viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) mutated PDAC or other solid tumors.

    at UCLA

  • ERAS-007 in Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    - To evaluate the safety and tolerability of escalating doses of ERAS-007 in combination with other cancer therapies in study participants with advanced GI malignancies. - To determine the Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) and/or Recommended Dose (RD) of ERAS-007 administered in combination with other cancer therapies. - To evaluate the antitumor activity of ERAS-007 in combination with other cancer therapies. - To evaluate the PK profiles of ERAS-007 and other cancer therapies when administered in combination.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • LGK974 in Patients With Malignancies Dependent on Wnt Ligands

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary purpose of this study is to find the recommended dose of LGK974 as a single agent and in combination with PDR001 that can be safely given to adult patients with selected solid malignancies that have progressed despite standard therapy or for which no effective standard therapy exists

    at UCLA

  • NBF-006 in Non-Small Cell Lung, Pancreatic, or Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, non-controlled study conducted in two parts - Part A (dose escalation) followed by Part B (dose expansion).

    at UCSD

  • Select Drug Combinations in Adult Patients With Advanced/Metastatic BRAF V600 Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    A phase Ib, open-label platform study of select drug combinations chosen in order to characterize safety and tolerability of each treatment arm tested and to identify recommended doses and regimens for future studies.

    at UCLA

  • Vobramitamab Duocarmazine in Participants With Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer and Other Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Study CP-MGC018-03 is an open-label, two-part, Phase 2 study. Part 1 of the study will enroll participants with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) previously treated with one prior androgen receptor axis-targeted therapy (ARAT). ARAT includes abiraterone, enzalutamide, or apalutamide. Participants may have received up to 1 prior docetaxel-containing regimen, but no other chemotherapy agents. This part of the study will assess the efficacy and tolerability of vobramitamab duocarmazine (MGC018) in two experimental arms (2.0 mg/kg every 4 weeks [Q4W] and 2.7 mg/kg Q4W) . Approximately 100 participants will be randomized 1:1. Part 2 of the study will enroll participants with locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anus, melanoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), squamous non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Participants must have progressive following at least 1 prior line of standard chemotherapy for advanced or metastatic disease. Participants will receive vobramitamab docarmazine at a dose of 2.7 mg/kg every 4 weeks. Up to 200 participants may be enrolled in Part 2. In both parts, vobramitamab duocarmazine will be administered intravenously (IV) in clinic on Day 1 of each 4-week cycle. Vobramitamab duocarmazine will be administered for up to 26 cycles, approximately 2 years, until criteria for treatment discontinuation are met. Participants will undergo regular testing for signs of disease progression using computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bone scans, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood tests. Routine examinations and blood tests will be performed and evaluated by the study doctor.

    at UCLA

  • XL092 as Single-Agent and Combination Therapy in Subjects With Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation and expansion study, evaluating the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), preliminary antitumor activity, and effect on biomarkers of XL092 administered alone, in combination with atezolizumab, and in combination with avelumab to subjects with advanced solid tumors.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • XmAb®23104 in Subjects With Selected Advanced Solid Tumors (DUET-3)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1, multiple dose, ascending dose escalation study to define a MTD/RD and regimen of XmAb23104, to describe safety and tolerability, to assess PK and immunogenicity, and to preliminarily assess anti-tumor activity of XmAb23104 monotherapy and combination therapy with ipilimumab in subjects with selected advanced solid tumors.

    at UCSD

  • IPN01194 When Administered Alone in Adults With Advanced Solid Tumours

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to determine the appropriate dosage, safety and effectiveness of the study drug, IPN01194 in adults with advanced solid tumours. The participants in this study will have advanced solid tumours. 'Advanced solid tumours' refers to cancers that can occur in several places, including cancers in organs or tissues that have spread from their original site to nearby tissues or other parts of the body. In this study, all participants will receive the study drug, which will be taken by mouth (orally).

    at UCSD

  • NT219 Alone and in Combination With ERBITUX® (Cetuximab) in Adults With Advanced Solid Tumors and Head and Neck Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a phase 1/2, multi-center study with an open-label, dose escalation phase followed by a single-arm expansion phase to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy of NT219 alone and in combination with ERBITUX® (cetuximab) in adults with recurrent and/or metastatic solid tumors.

    at UCSD

  • Etrumadenant (AB928) Based Treatment Combinations in Participants With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase 1b/2 open-label study will evaluate the antitumour activity and safety of etrumadenant (AB928) treatment combinations in participants with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    at UCLA

  • Enable Continued Treatment Access for Subjects Previously Enrolled in Studies of Ruxolitinib

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to provide continued supply of ruxolitinib alone, ruxolitinib plus background cancer therapy, or background cancer therapy alone to subjects from an Incyte-sponsored study of ruxolitinib that has reached its study objectives or has been terminated. This study will also provide another mechanism for reporting adverse events related to study drug safety.

    at UCLA

  • Anal Cytology Collection Procedures in Predicting High-Grade Anal Dysplasia in Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This clinical trial compares three anal cytology collection procedures (collected at a single visit) in men who have sex with men (MSM). It also compares two different tests for human papilloma virus, the virus that causes high grade anal dysplasia, which is thought to occur before anal cancer. This study may help doctors develop better screening for high-grade anal dysplasia in MSM in order to identify those who need to return for additional screening and treatment.

    at UCLA

  • APL-101 Study of Subjects With NSCLC With c-Met EXON 14 Skip Mutations and c-Met Dysregulation Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    To assess: - efficacy of APL-101 as monotherapy for the treatment of NSCLC harboring MET Exon 14 skipping mutations, NSCLC harboring MET amplification, solid tumors harboring MET amplification, solid tumors harboring MET fusion, primary CNS tumors harboring MET alterations, solid tumors harboring wild-type MET with overexpression of HGF and MET - efficacy of APL-101 as an add-on therapy to EGFR inhibitor for the treatment of NSCLC harboring EGFR activating mutations and developed acquired resistance with MET amplification and disease progression after documented CR or PR with 1st line EGFR inhibitors (EGFR-I)

    at UCLA UCSF

  • M6620 and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    “Experimental targeted cancer therapy and chemotherapy combination for tumors that have returned, spread, or cannot be removed”

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of M6620 and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). M6620 and irinotecan hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, multicenter, global Phase 2 basket study of entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the treatment of patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK1/2/3, ROS1, or ALK gene fusion. Patients will be assigned to different baskets according to tumor type and gene fusion.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UCSF

  • BOLD-100 in Combination With FOLFOX for the Treatment of Advanced Solid Tumours

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    BOLD-100 is an intravenously administered sterile solution containing the ruthenium-based small molecule. BOLD-100 has been shown to preferentially decrease the expression of GRP78 in tumour cells and ER stressed cells when compared to normal cells. BOLD-100 will be combined with cytotoxic FOLFOX chemotherapy in this study, with a dose escalation cohort to ensure tolerability and safety, followed by a cohort expansion phase.

    at UCLA

  • Carboplatin-paclitaxel With Retifanlimab or Placebo in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Squamous Cell Anal Carcinoma (POD1UM-303/InterAACT 2).

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is a Phase 3 global, multicenter, placebo-controlled double-blind randomized study that will enroll participants with inoperable locally recurrent or metastatic SCAC not previously treated with systemic chemotherapy.

    at UC Davis

  • Circulating Tumor DNA Testing in Predicting Treatment for Patients With Stage IIA Colon Cancer After Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II/III trial studies how well circulating tumor deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) testing in the blood works in predicting treatment for patients with stage IIA colon cancer after surgery. ctDNA are circulating tumor cells that are shed by tumors into the blood. Finding ctDNA in the blood means that there is very likely some small amounts of cancer that remain after surgery. However, this cancer, if detected, cannot be found on other tests usually used to find cancer, as it is too small. Testing for ctDNA levels may help identify patients with colon cancer after surgery who do benefit, and those who do not benefit, from receiving chemotherapy.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSF

  • Colonoscopy Versus Fecal Immunochemical Test in Reducing Mortality From Colorectal Cancer (CONFIRM)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently the second most common cause of cancer death in the United States, and one of the most preventable cancers. It has been shown in several randomized controlled trials that screening using fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) reduces CRC mortality by 13-33%. While there is strong consensus amongst experts regarding the value of CRC screening, the best approach to screening is not clear. Of the widely recommended modalities, FOBT and colonoscopy are the most commonly used within the United States. FOBT is inexpensive, non-invasive, and its use as a screening tool is supported by the highest quality evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials). Moreover, newer FOBT, such as fecal immunochemical tests or FITs, have advantages over conventional FOBT in terms of both test characteristics and ease of use that make them quite attractive as a population-based screening tool. While colonoscopy is invasive and has higher up-front risks and costs than FOBT, it does afford the opportunity to directly assess the colonic mucosa and is widely believed to be the best test to detect colorectal cancer. In addition, colonoscopy allows for the detection and removal of colorectal adenomas -a well recognized colorectal cancer precursor. There is indirect evidence that suggests colonoscopy is effective in reducing colorectal cancer mortality, but to date, no large clinical trials have been completed to support this assumption. While colonoscopy use is increasing, data is emerging that colonoscopy may not be as effective as previously believed. Prior support for colonoscopy as a screening test relied upon effectiveness estimates that now appear to be overly optimistic. Given the invasive nature of colonoscopy, the associated small, but real risk of complications, and dramatically higher costs than other screening tests, it is especially important to determine the true comparative effectiveness of colonoscopy relative to other proven non-invasive options. The investigators propose to perform a, large, simple, multicenter, randomized, parallel group trial directly comparing screening colonoscopy with annual FIT screening in average risk individuals. The hypothesis is that colonoscopy will be superior to FIT in the prevention of colorectal cancer mortality measured over 10 years. Individuals will be enrolled if they are currently eligible for CRC screening (e.g. no colonoscopy in the past 10 years and no FOBT in the past 1 year) and are between 50 and 75 years of age. The investigators will exclude individuals for whom colonoscopy is indicated (e.g. signs or symptoms of CRC, first degree family member with CRC, personal history of colorectal neoplasia or inflammatory bowel disease). All participants will complete baseline demographic, medication, and lifestyle questionnaires (e.g. diet, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory use, frequency of exercise) prior to randomization in a 1:1 ratio to either screening colonoscopy or annual FIT screening (Figure 1). Those testing positive by FIT will undergo evaluation to determine appropriateness for colonoscopy. Screening will be performed in a manner consistent with the currently accepted standard of care in order to determine the comparative effectiveness of the two screening strategies. Participants will be surveyed annually to determine if they have undergone colonoscopy or been diagnosed with CRC. The primary study endpoint will be CRC mortality within 10 years of enrollment. The secondary endpoints are (1) the incidence of CRC within 10 years of enrollment and (2) major complications of colonoscopy. Mortality will be determined through queries of the VA Vital Status File. Cause of death will be determined primarily using death certificates from the National Death Index-Plus database, augmented by adjudication of medical records for known CRC cases where CRC is not listed as a cause of death on the death certificate. The investigators postulate that screening colonoscopy will result in a 40% reduction in CRC mortality over 10 years relative to annual FIT screening. Using a log-rank test with a 2-sided test of significance, =0.05, a sample size of 50,000 participants will be required to test the primary hypothesis with 82% power, assuming a 1% annual rate of crossover from FIT to colonoscopy and a 0.5% annual rate of loss to follow-up. The planned study duration is 12.5 years with 2.5 years of recruitment and 10 years of follow-up for all enrolled participants.

    at UCSD

  • ColoRectal Cancer Screening for Southern California Community Health Centers

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening can reduce cancer deaths. However, screening and abnormal test follow-up rates are low among underserved populations. The screening rates of 19-58%, and rates of colonoscopy completion after abnormal stool tests of 18-57% in community health centers (CHC) systems are low. This highlights an opportunity to improve early detection and decrease burden of CRC in our region. Mailed outreach and navigation programs have been shown to increase colonoscopy completion rate. The next step is to understand how to best implement these programs in the community on a larger scale. To achieve this goal, the investigators propose a Hub-and-Spoke intervention combining centralized strategies to maximize CRC screening, follow-up, and referral-to-care. The investigators hypothesize that this intervention will be superior to usual care for increasing CRC screening, abnormal test follow-up, and referral-to-care. The investigators will conduct a randomized trial to determine effectiveness in: 1) improvement in proportion of individuals up-to-date with screening 3 years post implementation; 2) proportion with abnormal FIT who complete diagnostic colonoscopy within 6 months; and 3) proportion with CRC completing first treatment evaluation. The investigators will also evaluate the implementation, scalability, and sustainability of the multi-level implementation strategy. The intervention consists of: Mailed FIT and Reminders. Eligible individuals will receive an introductory letter describing the importance of CRC screening and noting that follow-up mail will include a FIT Kit. It will also be offered to patients who completed prior mailed FIT with normal test results. All materials will be in English and Spanish. Two weeks later, participants will receive a packet via mail containing the FIT kit, a one-page invitation inviting FIT completion and FIT instructions, a postage-paid envelope for return to the patient's CHC, and COVID-19 message. For non-compliant individuals not returning the kit, a reminder phone call and text message will be delivered 2 weeks later. The investigators will track returned letters, individuals who are later found to be up-to date with screening, and those who decline screening. The CHC will provide care coordination for patients with an abnormal FIT result.

    at UCSD

  • COM701 (an Inhibitor of PVRIG) in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors.

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1 open label sequential dose escalation and cohort expansion study evaluating the safety, tolerability and preliminary clinical activity of COM701 as monotherapy and in combination with nivolumab.

    at UCLA

  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer and Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy and atezolizumab to see how well it works compared with combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with stage III colon cancer and deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy with atezolizumab may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with colon cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and/or Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair Metastatic Colorectal Cancer, the COMMIT Study

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and/or atezolizumab work in treating patients with deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair colorectal cancer that has spread from where it first started (primary site) to other places in the body (metastatic). Chemotherapy drugs, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bevacizumab may stop or slow colorectal cancer by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Community Collaboration to Advance Racial/Ethnic Equity in CRC Screening

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The goal of this pragmatic randomized clinical trial is to compare two colorectal (CRC) screening outreach approaches (FIT and Cologuard) in community health centers (CHC) in patients overdue for CRC screening. The main questions the project aims to answer are: What screening test has a higher completion rate? What screening test is more feasible and acceptable in a CHC setting? Patients will be sent a CRC screening test in the mail and will be asked to complete it at home and mail it back. Researchers will compare the completion rates for each screening test and will also look at the overall completion rate of both tests.

    at UCLA

  • Durvalumab and Tremelimumab With or Without High or Low-Dose Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Colorectal or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab and tremelimumab and to see how well they work with or without high or low-dose radiation therapy in treating patients with colorectal or non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with durvalumab and tremelimumab, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving durvalumab and tremelimumab with radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with colorectal or non-small cell lung cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) Plus Lenvatinib (E7080/MK-7902) in Previously Treated Participants With Select Solid Tumors (MK-7902-005/E7080-G000-224/LEAP-005)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with pembrolizumab (MK-3475) and lenvatinib (E7080/MK-7902) in participants with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), ovarian cancer, gastric cancer, colorectal cancer (CRC), glioblastoma (GBM), biliary tract cancers (BTC), or pancreatic cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Epacadostat (INCB024360) Added to Preoperative Chemoradiation in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate epacadostat when given with routine radiation therapy and chemotherapy (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) to treat rectal cancer before routine surgery is performed to remove the tumor. The Phase II portion of the trial has not started recruiting.

    at UC Irvine

  • First-in-Human Positron Emission Tomography Study Using the 18F-αvβ6-Binding-Peptide

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This clinical trial studies the side effects of 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide and how well it works in imaging patients with primary or cancer that has spread to the breast, colorectal, lung, or pancreatic. Radiotracers, such as 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide, may improve the ability to locate cancer in the body.

    at UC Davis

  • Fc-Engineered Anti-CTLA-4 Monoclonal Antibody in Advanced Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This study is an open-label, Phase 1, multicenter study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of a novel fragment crystallizable (Fc)-engineered immunoglobulin G1 anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (anti-CTLA-4) human monoclonal antibody (botensilimab) monotherapy and in combination with an anti-programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) antibody (balstilimab), and to assess the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in participants with advanced solid tumors. This study will also determine the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) of botensilimab monotherapy and in combination with balstilimab.

    at UCLA

  • Fluoxetine for the Modification of Colorectal Tumor Immune Cells Before Surgery in Patients With Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This phase I trial tests whether fluoxetine (prozac) works to modify the tumor immune cells before surgery in patients with colorectal cancer. Fluoxetine is a commonly used selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) prescribed for major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety. Giving fluoxetine may modify the immune cell composition in the tumor and its microenvironment and may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread in patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UCLA

  • Gevokizumab With Standard of Care Anti-cancer Therapies for Metastatic Colorectal, Gastroesophageal, and Renal Cancers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will determine the pharmacodynamically-active dose of gevokizumab and the tolerable dose of gevokizumab in combination with the standard of care anti-cancer therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, metastatic gastroesophageal cancer and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and the preliminary efficacy of gevokizumab in combination with the SOC anti-cancer therapy in subjects with mCRC and mGEC.

    at UCLA

  • Head to Head Mailed Cologuard to Mailed FIT

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The objective of this pilot study is to compare the effectiveness of mailed outreach of two stool based tests, Cologuard and the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in screening eligible adults ages 45-49 receiving care at the University of California San Diego Health system.

    at UCSD

  • IMProving Adherence to Colonoscopy Through Teams and Technology

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Complete and timely colonoscopy after an abnormal stool-based colorectal cancer screening test results in early detection, cancer prevention, and reduction in mortality, but follow-up in safety-net health systems occurs in less than 50% at 6 months. The proposal will implement multi-level approach consisting of a stepped-wedge clinic-level intervention of team-based best practices co-developed with primary and specialty care, a patient-level technology intervention to provide enhanced instructions and navigation to complete diagnostic colonoscopy, and a mixed methods evaluation to explore multi-level factors contributing to intervention outcomes. Developing a solution to this high-risk and diverse population has the potential to translate to other health systems, support patient self-management, and address other patient conditions.

    at UCSF

  • Improving Colonoscopy Surveillance for Patients With High Risk Colon Polyps

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This clinical trial tests a multilevel intervention at the clinic, provider and patient levels, to improve colonoscopy surveillance in patients with high risk colon polyps. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common and deadly disease that is largely preventable through the detection and removal of colorectal polyps. One million Americans are diagnosed with high risk polyps of the colon or rectum annually and are at increased risk for CRC; however, uptake of recommended repeat colonoscopy in 3 years to reduce CRC risk is low in this group. This multilevel intervention may work to improve timely colonoscopy screening for patients with high risk colon polyps.

    at UCLA

  • Transanal TME (taTME)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Radical rectal cancer resection, namely total mesorectal excision (TME), is the cornerstone of the treatment of resectable rectal cancer. In combination with chemotherapy and radiation treatment (CRT), complete TME with negative resection margins is associated with sustained local and systemic control even in locally advanced disease. Over the last 2 decades, laparoscopic and robotic techniques have been increasingly adopted due to reduced surgical trauma and faster patient recovery. Yet, both approaches are associated with equivalent postoperative morbidity and disturbances in sexual, urinary and defecatory function relative to open TME. Furthermore, laparoscopic and robotic TME remain associated with substantial conversion rates and variable rates of TME completeness as a result of the procedural difficulties reaching the low rectum from the abdominal approach. Transanal TME (taTME) with laparoscopic assistance was developed to facilitate completion of TME using a primary transanal endoscopic approach. Transanal TME uses a "bottom-up approach" to overcome the technical difficulties of low pelvic dissection using an abdominal approach. Published results from single-center taTME series and an international registry suggest the short-term procedural and oncologic safety of this approach in resectable rectal cancer. No multicenter phase II study has yet been conducted to validate the procedural safety, functional outcomes or long-term oncologic outcomes of this approach. Study Design: This is a 5-year phase II multicenter single-arm study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low anterior resection (LAR) with taTME using laparoscopic or robotic assistance in 100 eligible subjects with resectable rectal cancer. Hypothesis: taTME is non-inferior to standard LAR with respect to the quality of the TME achieved.

    at UC Irvine

  • Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Excision And Observation vs Chemoradiotherapy For Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study is being done to answer the following questions: Is the chance of rectal cancer responding the same if chemotherapy alone is given before limited surgery compared to chemotherapy and radiation therapy given together before limited surgery? If radiation therapy is not given, is quality of life better?

    at UC Irvine

  • Nivolumab After Combined Modality Therapy in Treating Patients With High Risk Stage II-IIIB Anal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial investigates how well nivolumab after combined modality therapy works in treating patients with high risk stage II-IIIB anal cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Nivolumab With or Without Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Anal Canal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab with or without ipilimumab works in treating patients with anal canal cancer that has not responded to previous treatment (refractory) and that has spread from where it first started (primary site) to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    at UC Davis

  • Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Surgery for Stage II Colon Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and bevacizumab to see how well they work compared to oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil in treating patients who have undergone surgery for stage II colon cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving combination chemotherapy together with bevacizumab is more effective than combination chemotherapy alone in treating colon cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Panitumumab, Regorafenib, or TAS-102, in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Unresectable RAS Wild-Type Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well retreatment with panitumumab works compared to standard of care regorafenib or trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (TAS-102) in treating patients with colorectal cancer that is negative for RAS wild-type colorectal cancer has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), and/or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), and is negative for resistance mutations in blood. Treatment with panitumumab may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Some tumors need growth factors to keep growing. Growth factor antagonists, such as regorafenib, may interfere with the growth factor and stop the tumor from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as TAS-102, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer than with the usual treatment of regorafenib or TAS-102.

    at UCSD

  • PROSPECT: Chemotherapy Alone or Chemotherapy Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer involves chemotherapy and radiation, known as 5FUCMT, (the chemotherapy drugs 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine and radiation therapy) prior to surgery. Although radiation therapy to the pelvis has been a standard and important part of treatment for rectal cancer and has been shown to decrease the risk of the cancer coming back in the same area in the pelvis, some patients experience undesirable side effects from the radiation and there have been important advances in chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation which may be of benefit. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, both good and bad, of the standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation to chemotherapy using a combination regimen known as FOLFOX, (the drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and leucovorin) and selective use of the standard treatment, depending on response to the FOLFOX. The drugs in the FOLFOX regimen are all FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved and have been used routinely to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil With or Without Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Fluorouracil may also make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. Leucovorin calcium may protect normal cells from the side effects of chemotherapy, and it may help fluorouracil work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drug. Giving radiation therapy together with chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying how well giving radiation therapy together with fluorouracil with or without combination therapy works in treating patients who are undergoing surgery for stage II or stage III rectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin in treating patients with lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or solid tumors with liver dysfunction. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by entering the cancer cells and by blocking the activity of proteins that are important for the cancer's growth and survival.

    at UC Davis

  • S0820, Adenoma and Second Primary Prevention Trial

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators hypothesize that the combination of eflornithine and sulindac will be effective in reducing a three-year event rate of adenomas and second primary colorectal cancers in patients previously treated for Stages 0 through III colon or rectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSD

  • S1613, Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab or Cetuximab and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2/Neu Amplified Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2/neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of selumetinib when given together with cyclosporine in treating patients with solid tumors or colorectal cancer that have spread to other places in the body and cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Selumetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Biological therapies, such as cyclosporine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Giving selumetinib and cyclosporine may be a better treatment for solid tumors or colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Sotorasib and Panitumumab Versus Investigator's Choice for Participants With Kirsten Rat Sarcoma (KRAS) p.G12C Mutation

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The aim of the study is to compare progression-free survival (PFS) in previously treated participants with Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS) p.G12C mutated colorectal cancer (CRC) receiving sotorasib 240 mg once daily (QD) and panitumumab vs investigator's choice (trifluridine and tipiracil, or regorafenib), and sotorasib 960 mg QD and panitumumab vs investigator's choice (trifluridine and tipiracil, or regorafenib).

    at UC Irvine

  • Cabozantinib Plus TAS102 in mCRC as Salvage Therapy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a phase I clinical trial assessing the safety and recommended phase II dose of cabozantinib in combination with trifluridine/tipiracil (TAS102) in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC).

    at UC Irvine

  • Dato-Dxd as Monotherapy and in Combination With Anti-cancer Agents in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumours (TROPION-PanTumor03)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    TROPION-PanTumor03 will investigate the safety, tolerability, and anti-tumour activity of Datopotamab Deruxtecan (Dato-DXd) as Monotherapy and in Combination with Anticancer Agents in Patients with Advanced/Metastatic Solid Tumours.

    at UCLA

  • Magrolimab Given Together With FOLFIRI/BEV in Patients With Previously Treated Advanced Inoperable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The goals of this clinical study are to learn more about the safety, tolerability and effectiveness of magrolimab in combination with bevacizumab and 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, and leucovorin (FOLFIRI) in previously treated participants with advanced inoperable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The primary objectives of this study are: (safety run-in cohort) to evaluate safety and tolerability, and the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) and (randomized cohort) to evaluate the efficacy of magrolimab in combination with bevacizumab and 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, and leucovorin (FOLFIRI) in previously treated participants with advanced inoperable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

    at UCLA

  • NGM120 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors, Pancreatic Cancer, and Prostate Cancer Using Combination Therapy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Study of NGM120 in subjects with advanced solid tumors and and pancreatic cancer (Part 1 and 2) and metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (Part 3).

    at UCLA

  • Onvansertib in Combination With FOLFIRI and Bevacizumab Versus FOLFIRI and Bevacizumab for Second Line Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Participants With a Kirsten Rat Sarcoma Virus Gene (KRAS) or Neuroblastoma-RAS (NRAS) Mutation

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of 2 different doses of onvansertib in combination with a chemotherapy regimen of irinotecan, fluorouracil [5-FU], and leucovorin (FOLFIRI) and bevacizumab for treatment of confirmed metastatic and/or unresectable colorectal cancer (CRC) in participants with a kirsten rat sarcoma virus gene (KRAS) or neuroblastoma-RAS (NRAS) mutation who have progressed on an oxaliplatin/fluoropyrimidinebased regimen in the first-line setting.

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • Romiplostim for Chemotherapy-induced Thrombocytopenia in Adult Subjects With Gastrointestinal, Pancreatic, or Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Study of Romiplostim for Chemotherapy-induced Thrombocytopenia in Adult Subjects with Gastrointestinal, Pancreatic, or Colorectal Cancer

    at UC Irvine

  • Seribantumab in Adult Patients With NRG1 Gene Fusion Positive Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is an open-label, international, multi-center, Phase 2 study in adult patients with recurrent, locally-advanced or metastatic solid tumors, which harbor the NRG1 gene fusion.

    at UC Irvine

  • KPT-8602 in Participants With Relapsed/Refractory Cancer Indications

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a first-in-human, multi-center, open-label clinical study with separate dose escalation (Phase 1) and expansion (Phase 2) stages to assess preliminary safety, tolerability, and efficacy of the second generation oral XPO1 inhibitor KPT-8602 in participants with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM), metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome (HRMDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and newly diagnosed intermediate/high-risk MDS. Dose escalation and dose expansion may be included for all parts of the study as determined by ongoing study results.

    at UCLA

  • D-1553 in Subjects With Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a phase 1/2, open label study of D-1553 single agent and combination treatment to assess the safety and tolerability, identify the MTD and RP2D, evaluate the PK properties and antitumor activities in subjects with advanced or metastatic solid tumor with KRasG12C mutation.

    at UCSF

  • Surgery in Treating Patients With Early Stage Anal Canal or Perianal Cancer and HIV Infection

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies surgery in treating patients with anal canal or perianal cancer that is small and has not spread deeply into the tissues and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Local surgery may be a safer treatment with fewer side effects than bigger surgery or radiation and chemotherapy.

    at UCSF

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II MATCH screening and multi-sub-trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myelomas that may have spread from where it first started to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced) and does not respond to treatment (refractory). Patients must have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

  • Testing Nivolumab and Ipilimumab With Short-Course Radiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase II trial investigates the effect of nivolumab and ipilimumab when given together with short-course radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving nivolumab, ipilimumab, and radiation therapy may kill more cancer cells.

    at UC Irvine

  • Nivolumab to Standard Treatment for Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Colorectal Cancer That Have a BRAF Mutation

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase II trial tests whether adding nivolumab to the usual treatment (encorafenib and cetuximab) works better than the usual treatment alone to shrink tumors in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and whose tumor has a mutation in a gene called BRAF. Encorafenib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It is used in patients whose cancer has a certain mutation (change) in the BRAF gene. It works by blocking the action of mutated BRAF that signals cancer cells to multiply. This helps to stop or slow the spread of cancer cells. Cetuximab is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It binds to a protein called EGFR, which is found on some types of cancer cells. This may help keep cancer cells from growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nivolumab in combination with encorafenib and cetuximab may be more effective than encorafenib and cetuximab alone at stopping tumor growth and spreading in patients with metastatic or unresectable BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine

  • Active After Cancer Trial (AACT)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is being done to determine whether a telephone-based counseling intervention can help survivors of breast and colorectal cancer increase their weekly physical activity. Observational evidence suggests that physical activity after breast and colorectal cancer diagnosis decreases recurrence rates. Unfortunately, many people become less active during cancer therapy, and a substantial proportion never return to pre-diagnosis levels of physical activity. This study looks to see if people who have recently finished chemotherapy for breast, colon or rectal cancer can be motivated to increase their exercise by talking to an exercise specialist over the phone. The study also looks at changes in mood, fatigue, fitness, fat distribution and weight.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • PC14586 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors Harboring a TP53 Y220C Mutation (PYNNACLE)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This Phase 1/2 study will assess the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of multiple dose levels of PC14586 (INN: rezatapopt) alone (monotherapy) and in combination with pembrolizumab in participants with advanced solid tumors containing a TP53 Y220C mutation.

    at UCSD

  • Treatment in Preventing Anal Cancer in Patients With HIV and Anal High-Grade Lesions

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The randomized phase of the trial compared topical or ablative treatment with active monitoring in preventing anal cancer in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Anal HSIL is tissue in the anal canal that has been damaged by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and is at risk for turning into anal cancer. The ANCHOR Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) determined that the primary study endpoint was completed, based on the data and statistical analysis presented to them on 07SEP2021. In the post-randomization phase of this trial, all enrolled participants are offered treatment for HSIL and/or follow-up, at the participant's choice.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Evaluating 3-year Disease Free Survival in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Plus Induction or Consolidation Chemotherapy and Total Mesorectal Excision or Non-operative Management

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The study is designed to test the hypothesis that patients with Locally advanced rectal cancer ( LARC) treated with Total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) and Total mesorectal excision (TME) or Non-operative management (NOM) will have an improved 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to patients with similar tumors treated with Chemoradiation therapy (CRT), Total mesorectal excision (TME) and Adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT).

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • Tucatinib Combined With Trastuzumab and TAS-102 for the Treatment of HER2 Positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Molecularly Selected Patients, 3T Study

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This phase II trial studies whether tucatinib combined with trastuzumab and TAS-102 works to shrink tumors in patients with HER2 positive colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) and has one of the following gene mutations detected in blood: PIK3CA, KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF V600. Tucatinib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of the abnormal protein that signals tumor cells to multiply. This helps stop or slow the spread of tumor cells. Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. TAS-102 is a combination of 2 drugs; trifluridine and tipiracil. Trifluridine is in a class of medications called thymidine-based nucleoside analogues. It works by stopping the growth of tumor cells. Tipiracil is in a class of medications called thymidine phosphorylase inhibitors. It works by slowing the breakdown of trifluridine by the body. Giving tucatinib, trastuzumab, and TAS-102 together may work better than usual treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    at UCSD

  • Treatment of Cancers With Rearranged During Transfection (RET) Activation

    Sorry, not accepting new patients

    Expanded access for participants with cancer with RET activation who are ineligible for an ongoing selpercatinib (also known as LOXO-292) clinical trial or have other considerations that prevent access to selpercatinib through an existing clinical trial. The treating physician/investigator contacts Lilly when, based on their medical opinion, a patient meets the criteria for inclusion in the expanded access program.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Monitoring Treatment Response With On-board DWI During Neo-adjuvant Chemo-radiation for Rectal Cancer Using Magnetic Resonance-guided-radiotherapy Systems

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    feasibility of using a diffusion sequence of a MRgRT system as an early marker of treatment response during nRCT of rectal adenocarcinoma.

    at UCLA

  • Prevention of Colorectal Cancer Through Multiomics Blood Testing

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The PREEMPT CRC study is a prospective multi-center observational study to validate a blood-based test for the early detection of colorectal cancer by collecting blood samples from average-risk participants who will undergo a routine screening colonoscopy.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

Our lead scientists for Colorectal Cancer research studies include .

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