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Depression clinical trials at UC Health
50 in progress, 18 open to new patients

  • A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Intranasal Esketamine in Addition to Comprehensive Standard of Care for the Rapid Reduction of the Symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder, Including Suicidal Ideation, in Adult Participants Assessed to be at Imminent Risk for Suicide

    open to eligible people ages 18-64

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of intranasal esketamine 84 milligram (mg) compared with intranasal placebo in addition to comprehensive standard of care in reducing the symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), including suicidal ideation, in participants who are assessed to be at imminent risk for suicide, as measured by the change from baseline on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score at 24 hours post first dose.

    at UCSD

  • Adaptive Design Study of NEST sTMS in Subjects With Major Depressive Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 22-65

    This is a double-blind, sham controlled, multi-center study to confirm the safety and efficacy of synchronized transcranial magnetic stimulation (sTMS) for the treatment of patients currently experiencing an episode of depression who have failed to respond to at least one (1) antidepressant medication. Patients will be randomly assigned to either active or sham therapy and will undergo daily treatments for a period of time. Following completion of blinded treatments, patients may be eligible for a course of open label treatments.

    at UCLA

  • Biomarkers of Fast Acting Therapies in Major Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-64

    The drug Ketamine, available in medical practice since the late 1960s, is currently used for inducing general anesthesia or sedation during medical procedures. When given slowly as an injection into a vein, ketamine is shown to produce a very rapid effect on depression and to improve depressive symptoms within hours to days. By studying patients who receive a ketamine IV infusion, as an add-on treatment for depression, investigators may start to understand how changes in the brain or in gene function relate to getting better over a very short period of time. In this study, the investigators will enroll 60 patients currently ill with major depression selected to receive IV ketamine therapy under medical supervision. To study neurobiological changes relating to symptom improvement, the investigators will use advanced brain scans to measure brain structure, chemistry and function. Blood samples will measure changes in gene regulation and immune system response. Although some people have a rapid antidepressant response to ketamine, others do not respond. Also, antidepressant effects after ketamine usually wear off within days to weeks. We will determine if up to four doses of ketamine delivered two to three times a week may prolong antidepressant response to ketamine therapy. To determine the durability of ketamine treatment for depression, patients will be monitored by phone and via electronic devices twice a week for up to five weeks and will return for a final assessment when their symptoms return. For this trial, brain and blood sample measurements will occur before and after a patient receives their first ketamine infusion. Patients who do not remit after an initial dose of ketamine, will receive up to three additional ketamine treatments. Mood will be measured 24-hours after each subsequent ketamine infusion and brain and blood measurements be repeated at the time of remission or after the fourth ketamine infusion if remission does not occur. Patients will return for a final brain scan and blood sample when their depressive symptoms return or at five weeks if they continue remission. Investigators will able to see how changes brain measurements, gene regulation and immune response relate to improvements and relapse of depressive symptoms with ketamine IV therapy. The ketamine infusion sessions will occur at a special research unit (CTRC) at UCLA.

    at UCLA

  • Brain Connectivity and Response to Tai Chi in Geriatric Depression

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects after 6 months of supervised weekly Tai-Chi-Chi versus Health Education and Wellness classes on reduction of depressive symptoms and improvement in resilience, health functioning, quality of life, cognition, sleep, fMRI neural correlates of working memory, and brain structure.

    at UCLA

  • Cellular Aging and Neurobiology of Depression Study

    open to eligible people ages 21-60

    We are conducting an eight week longitudinal study to learn if blood levels of certain naturally occurring compounds and genetic markers differ between patients with depression and healthy adults who are not depressed, and if any such differences relate to memory performance, mood, and neurobiology. We will do this by comparing the unmedicated depressed patients with matched healthy controls at baseline and then following the depressed patients over the course of eight weeks of standardized antidepressant treatment to gauge which baseline abnormalities normalize over the course of treatment.

    at UCSF

  • Computerized Substance Use and Depression Screening and Behavioral Treatment in HIV Primary Care

    open to all eligible people

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) and depression in HIV-infected patients result in poor HIV outcomes, yet are often unrecognized and untreated. To address these problems, this study examines the implementation and effectiveness of a clinical intervention consisting of self-administered tablet-based SUD and depression screening at routine HIV primary care clinic visits, followed by evidence-based treatments for SUD and depression delivered by a behavioral health specialist. If successful, this study has potential to reduce SUD- and depression-related problems and reduce HIV treatment disparities for patients with these comorbidities.

    at UCSF

  • Effectiveness of CES on Emotional and Cellular Wellbeing

    open to eligible males ages 18-40

    The investigators aim to use a CES (cranial electrotherapy stimulation) intervention to improve emotional well-being by reducing symptoms of anxiety and depression and to assess for changes in markers of cellular health - specifically, telomere length and telomerase activity

    at UCLA

  • Lithium for Suicidal Behavior in Mood Disorders

    open to all eligible people

    Observational evidence and findings from clinical trials conducted for other reasons suggest that lithium, a drug used for the treatment of bipolar disorder, and, to a lesser extent, depression, may reduce rates of suicides and suicide attempts. However, this hypothesis has not yet been adequately examined in a randomized clinical trial conducted specifically to test lithium's efficacy in preventing suicides. This clinical trial fills this gap. This study is feasible within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) because it is a large, integrated health system with existing programs for identifying patients at risk for suicide and delivering enhanced services. In VA, approximately 12,000 patients with depression or bipolar disorder survive a suicide attempt or related behavior each year, and 15% of them repeat within one year. Experimental treatment in this study will supplement usual care for major depression or bipolar disorder, as well as VA's standard, enhanced management for patients at high risk. The investigators will recruit 1862 study participants, from approximately 30 VA Hospitals. Participants will be patients with bipolar disorder or depression who have survived a recent episode of suicidal self-directed violence or were hospitalized specifically to prevent suicide. Randomly, half will receive lithium, and half will receive placebo. Neither the patients nor their doctors will know whether a particular person has received lithium or placebo. The treatment will be administered and the patients will be followed for one year, after which patients will go back to usual care. Recruitment will occur over 3 years. The investigators are primarily interested in whether lithium leads to increases in the time to the first repeated episode of suicidal behavior, including suicide attempts, interrupted attempts, hospitalizations specifically to prevent suicide, and deaths from suicide. In addition, this study will allow us to explore whether lithium decreases the total number of suicidal behaviors, and whether it has comparable effects on impulsive and non-impulsive behaviors. If there is an effect of lithium, the investigators will be interested in whether or not it could be attributed to improved control of the underlying mental health condition, or, alternatively, whether it represents a direct effect of suicide-related behavior.

    at UCSD

  • Metformin, Vitamin D, and Depression in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Trial

    open to eligible females ages 18-45

    Open-label randomized clinical trial assessing the efficacy of Metformin versus Vitamin D in improving symptoms of depressed mood in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    at UCSF

  • Motivating Our Mothers 2

    open to eligible females ages 21-65

    Mothers with symptoms suggesting clinical depression can be identified and potentially motivated to seek further care during pediatric visits for their young children. The best ways for pediatric providers to encourage mothers to seek further evaluation and treatment for their depressive symptoms are not known. The investigators plan to provisionally optimize a pediatric office-based intervention that the investigators developed to motivate mothers who may be depressed to seek further care and, thereby to improve the well-being of women from diverse backgrounds and their children.

    at UC Davis

  • Multimodal MRI Characteristics of Psychotherapy Response in Late Life Depression

    open to eligible people ages 65 years and up

    The specific focus of this study is to gather data regarding the effects of a psychological therapy known as Problem Solving Therapy (PST) on cerebral blood flow (CBF), cortical gray matter (GM) atrophy, subcortical white matter (WM) lesion burden, and measures of cognitive function in subjects with Late Life Major Depressive Disorder (LLD). This research goal will be achieved by recruiting 110 individuals over the age of 65 with LLD. The primary outcomes will be change in CBF, change in GM atrophy, change in WM lesion, change in cognitive function, and change in depression severity from baseline to the end of 12 weeks of PST.

    at UCSF

  • Novel Behavioral Intervention to Enhance Social Connections in Anxiety and Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-55

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a novel transdiagnostic behavioral treatment -- social approach training -- intended to enhance positive social connections in individuals with elevated anxiety and/or depression. Social relationship impairments are pervasive and debilitating consequences of anxiety and depression. Existing treatments have some beneficial impact on social functioning; however, many people continue to have few and/or poor quality relationships following treatment, even after experiencing symptom relief. This study will evaluate the effects of social approach training on the brain systems that have been shown to be important for establishing positive connections with others. Approximately 60 individuals (ages 18-55) seeking treatment for anxiety or depression will participate in this study. Participants will be randomly assigned with equal probability to one of two versions of social approach training (5 or 10 sessions) or a waitlist (assessment only) control group. Participants will be assessed at baseline and post-treatment and compared on measures assessing brain responses to social reward (primary outcome), as well as physiological, behavioral, and emotional responses to social reward (secondary outcomes). It is hypothesized that participants assigned to social approach training will display greater increases from pre- to post-treatment in activity in brain systems that regulate the processing of social reward (e.g., striatum) relative to participants in the control group. This study will also determine whether the 5- vs. 10-session versions of the treatment program result in meaningful differences, compared to each other, in how the brain responds to social reward.

    at UCSD

  • Optimizing Outcomes of Treatment-Resistant Depression in Older Adults

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    The purpose of this research study is to assess which antidepressants work the best in older adults who have treatment-resistant depression (TRD).

    at UCLA

  • Sleep and Healthy Aging Research for Depression (SHARE-D) Study

    open to eligible people ages 60-90

    Late-life depression is a significant public health concern, and effective interventions for prevention and treatment are needed. Insomnia and inflammation are modifiable targets for depression prevention, and this study is significant in using an experimental approach (i.e., inflammatory challenge) to probe acute inflammatory- and depression responses as a function of insomnia, which will inform identification of molecular targets for pharmacologic interventions, and improvement of insomnia treatments to prevent depression in older adults. Project

    at UCLA

  • Sleep Health, Inflammation, and Emotion Study

    open to eligible females ages 60-80

    Late-life depression is a major public health burden due to its high prevalence and associated morbidity, suicide risk, functional decline, and mortality. Unfortunately, current antidepressant therapies have limited effectiveness; hence, biologically plausible models for new treatments are being pursued. Systemic inflammation is hypothesized to play an important role on the onset and perpetuation of depression, especially in older women. Aging processes involve a heightened inflammatory state, and both inflammatory disorders and depression are more prevalent in women than men. However, increased systemic inflammation does not necessarily lead to depression in all women. Even when robust systemic inflammation is experimentally induced (e.g. endotoxin administration), largely variable increases in depressive symptoms are found. Defining the factors that account for this variability may identify individuals at risk of developing depression when exposed to heightened inflammatory states such as aging, obesity, and chronic disease, and informs future translational studies of depression prevention. In particular, the role of sleep disturbance in explaining this variability requires further attention because it is an independent risk factor for depression and heightens systemic inflammation by increasing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. The investigators have also discovered that women, but not men, who report sleep disturbance including short sleep duration experience significantly more depressive symptoms in response to an inflammatory challenge than women without sleep disturbance. Thus, it is hypothesized that sleep loss is a vulnerability factor for inflammation-induced depressive symptoms in women. However, to date, no experimental approach has been used to evaluate the role of sleep loss on inflammation-induced depressive symptoms. This proposal aims to examine this hypothesis by partial sleep deprivation (PSD) followed by endotoxin challenge in older women. It also aims to explore genomic and socio- emotional mechanisms underlying the association between sleep loss and depressive symptoms. In a randomized controlled factorial design, 80 healthy female volunteers aged 60 to 80 will be randomly assigned to one of 4 arms: 1) uninterrupted sleep followed by placebo; 2) uninterrupted sleep followed by endotoxin; 3) PSD followed by placebo; or 4) PSD followed by endotoxin. Subjects will be administered placebo or endotoxin in the morning after PSD or uninterrupted sleep. Depressive symptoms will be repeatedly assessed over 6 hours after placebo or endotoxin administration.

    at UCLA

  • Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Major Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-55

    Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a low-intensity neuromodulation technique of minimal risk that has been used as an experimental procedure for reducing depressive symptoms and symptoms of other brain disorders. Though tDCS applied to prefrontal brain areas is shown to reduce symptoms in some people with major depressive disorder (MDD), the extent of antidepressant response often differs. Methods that map current flow directly in the brain while a person is receiving tDCS and that determine how functional neuroimaging signal changes after a series of tDCS sessions may help us understand how tDCS works, how it can be optimized, and if it can be used as an effective intervention for reducing depressive symptoms. We will investigate these questions in a two-part randomized double blind exploratory clinical trial. The first part of the trial will compare how current flow and functional imaging signal differs in the brain when using tDCS with more focal stimulation, called high definition (HD) tDCS, compared to conventional tDCS (C-tDCS) or sham (non-active) tDCS in patients with MDD. Sixty people with depression (20 in each group) will be randomized to receive either HD-tDCS, C-tDCS or sham-tDCS for a total of 12 sessions each lasting 20 minutes occurring on consecutive weekdays. At the first and last session, subjects will receive 20-30 minutes of active or sham tDCS in the MRI scanner, which will allow us to map tDCS currents, and track changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) pre-to- post treatment using completely non-invasive methods. At the first and last session and mid-way through the trial, participants will also complete a series of clinical ratings and neurocognitive tests

    at UCLA

  • Treatment for Affect Dimensions

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Affect, or the tendency to experience a given emotion, often is subdivided into two domains. Positive affect is the tendency to experience positive emotions, such as happiness, excitement, elation, and enthusiasm. Negative affect is the tendency to experience negative emotions, such as anger, resentment, sadness, anxiety, and fear. Humans exhibit a range of emotions that span across positive and negative affect domains with some individuals experiencing more of one type of affect than another. Recent research and developing theories have suggested that mental health disorders can be conceptualized as the tendency for an individual to fall into one or more extremes on these categories. Therefore, treatments should not be based on targeting a conglomeration of symptoms (as we have been doing for the past century) but rather they should be treating the underlying dysregulation (e.g., high or low positive and negative affect). In an effort to address this gap, the current study plans to recruit participants for a treatment trial consisting of two psychotherapies: (a) positive affect treatment (PAT), and (b) negative affect treatment (NAT). The overarching goal of this project are to evaluate the target (i.e. potential mechanisms) of PAT. Participants will be randomized to either a 15-week positive (PAT) or negative affect treatment (NAT). Participants will also complete four laboratory visits (before treatment, during treatment (two times), and at post-treatment) to measure potential targets or mediators of PAT. These laboratory-based assessments will included measures of the positive affect system such as behavioral, subjective, and psychophysiological responses to reward, anticipation and motivation, reward attainment, and reward learning.

    at UCLA

  • Youth to Text or Telehealth for Engagement in HIV Care

    open to eligible people ages 18-29

    Youth To Text or Telehealth for Engagement in HIV Care (Y2TEC) is a randomized control pilot to assess the feasibility and acceptability of delivering a targeted problem-solving intervention to youth ages 18-29 living with HIV (YLWH) for improving HIV care engagement, mental health, and decreasing substance use. The intervention will be delivered to participants in two condition groups in remote telehealth sessions delivered via video-conference over 4 months. Participation in the study will last about 8 months. The investigators hypothesize that the Y2TEC intervention will be feasible and acceptable for YLWH, and will result in improved HIV clinical outcomes. If feasible and acceptable, it can be scaled up for a multi-site randomized clinical trial and ultimately offered in the clinical care of YLWH.

    at UCSF

  • An Adaptive Intervention for Depression Among Latinos Living With HIV.

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study will use a pilot sequential multiple assignment randomized trial (SMART) design to build an adaptive treatment strategy (ATS) for depression and engagement in HIV among Latinos living with HIV. The ATS is the sequencing of treatments, which are a behavioral activation therapy (BAT), a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and mobile health (mHealth) tool. The outcomes are to assess the feasibility of the SMART and ATS in the HIV care site and acceptability of the SMART and ATS to patients and clinic staff.

    at UCSF

  • Brain Aging and Treatment Response in Geriatric Depression

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The proposed project will evaluate the role of neuroimaging biomarkers of brain aging (i.e., neurodegenerative and vascular brain changes) and mild cognitive impairment in the patterns of treatment response to memantine combined with escitalopram compared to escitalopram and placebo.

    at UCLA

  • CALM for Pregnant and Post-Partum Women

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Anxiety and depression is common along pregnant mothers and has been found to increase risk for negative outcomes in both mothers and infants. These risks can include low infant birth weight, negative mother-infant interactions, and delayed developmental outcomes. Evidenced-based interventions to support pregnant women experiencing symptoms of depression or anxiety are not well studied or widely available, particularly for low-income women of color. These women may not have access to the type of healthcare that would best support their needs and/or they may not be familiar with or trust clinicians who deliver mental health interventions. The current randomized-controlled trial (RCT) aims to address these gaps in the literature by testing the feasibility and efficacy of a doula-supported, computer-assisted delivery of a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention designed to reduce pregnancy-related anxiety, depression, and prevent perinatal mood disorders. The 120 participants in the study (60 Black women and 60 Hispanic/Latina women) will be randomized to either receive the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) intervention (n=60) or treatment as usual (n=60). Participants assigned to the intervention will complete 6-8 sessions of CALM with a language and ethnically/racially-matched doula who has been trained as a CALM specialist in order to increase participant comfort and reduce the stigma associated with mental health services. Women in both groups will complete assessments of their pregnancy-related anxiety, general anxiety, depressive symptoms, and satisfaction with treatment (CALM or treatment as usual) at baseline, 12-weeks post-baseline, and 10-weeks post-birth. It is hypothesized that women assigned to the CALM intervention will have significantly less anxiety and depressive symptoms post-treatment and post-partum compared to the women assigned to treatment as usual. The results of the current RCT will be used to test the efficacy of the CALM intervention for pregnant women or color and to inform efforts for potential future scalability.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Characterizing Cognitive Decline in Late Life Depression: The ADNI Depression Project

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this research study is to characterize the mechanisms contributing to cognitive impairment and accelerated cognitive decline in Late Life Depression (LLD). This is a non-randomized, observational, non-treatment study. One hundred and twenty (120) subjects who meet criteria for Major Depression or LLD will be enrolled for a period of 30 months. Data from an additional 300 non-depressed subjects will be used from ADNI studies for comparison. Depression history, symptom severity and health information will be collected at the initial psychiatric visit to determine eligibility. A 3 Tesla (3T) Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan and florbetapir (18F-AV-45) amyloid imaging will be conducted at the ADNI clinic site visits. Collection of plasma and serum for biomarkers, clinical assessments and cognitive assessments will be conducted at two time points. Blood samples will also be collected for genetic analysis.

    at UCSF

  • Collaborative Care for Women Veterans

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Implementation of Tailored Collaborative Care for Women Veterans (CCWV) is designed to enhance primary care-mental health integration for women Veterans, by tailoring services to women Veterans' and providers' needs and providing an evidence-based intervention, Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management, to address anxiety and depression in a patient-centered approach. CCWV will be implemented in four of the Women's Health Practice-Based Research Network sites, with careful attention to local tailoring and adaptation to enhance the fit of the care model in varied local contexts.

    at UCSD

  • Community-Partnered Participatory Development of Mobile Interventions

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of the study is to test an experimental method, a text-messaging app called B-RESILIENT, for improving participants' mood. B-RESILIENT is a text messaging app adaptation of a Resiliency Course, developed by community members known as Building Resiliency and Community Hope.

    at UCLA

  • Comparative Effectiveness Research Trial for Antidepressant Incomplete and Non-responders With TRD

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This is a multi-site, randomized, open-label, effectiveness trial comparing three treatment arms for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) patients with TRD who are currently on ongoing, stable and adequate antidepressant therapy (ADT). Adequate ADT is defined as a therapeutically sufficient dose for a sufficient treatment period, which would be expected to be effective as listed in the MGH Antidepressant Treatment Response Questionnaire (ATRQ). Patients will be randomized in a 1:1:1 fashion to one of three open-label treatment arms: a) aripiprazole augmentation, b) rTMS augmentation, and c) switching to venlafaxine XR or Duloxetine.

    at UCLA

  • Depression And Primary-care Partnership for Effectiveness-implementation Research

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Despite carrying the vast majority of the global mental disorder burden, 75% of adults with mental disorders in Low and Middle Income Countries have no access to services. This study will test strategies for integrating evidence-based depression treatments with primary care services at a large public sector hospital and conduct robust cost and cost-benefit analyses of each treatment to produce a "menu" of cost-benefit options for integrated depression care with corresponding effectiveness and implementation values. The project is relevant to the mission of the National Institutes of Mental Health because it addresses mental health care delivery and related health economics at the individual, clinical and systems levels.

    at UCSF UCSD

  • Diabetes and Depression Text Messaging Intervention

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The first goal of the randomized trial will be to study the influence of personalized text messaging on both glycemic control and depressive symptoms. The primary outcomes for this aim will be improvements in physical activity. The secondary outcomes include diabetes and depressive symptoms at the 6-month follow-up, as well as mood and quality of life. The secondary goal of the trial is to evaluate the influence of nurse phone outreach on glycemic control and depressive symptoms for participants who are non-responsive to the text messaging approaches used in this study. In particular, a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial (SMART) design will use responsiveness data from participants during the course of the study to implement a second randomization step for nurse phone outreach.We will examine the same primary outcome and secondary health behavior outcomes among this sub-group.

    at UCSF

  • Early Palliative Care With Standard Care or Standard Care Alone in Improving Quality of Life of Patients With Incurable Lung or Non-colorectal Gastrointestinal Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The study intervention consists of the early integration of palliative care services into standard oncology care in an outpatient setting for patients with advanced lung and non-colorectal gastrointestinal malignancies who are not being treated with curative intent. The palliative care services provided to patients randomized to the intervention will be provided by board-certified physicians and/or advanced practice nurses and will focus on the following areas: (1) developing and maintaining the therapeutic relationship with the patients and family caregivers; (2) assessing and treating patient symptoms; (3) providing support and reinforcement of coping with advanced cancer in patients and family caregivers; (4) assessing and enhancing prognostic awareness and illness understanding in patients and family caregivers; (5) assisting with treatment decision-making; and (6) end-of-life care planning.

    at UCSD

  • ECT/Succinylcholine: Biochemical, Serum and Cardiovascular Changes

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This study will be conducted to determine the pharmacodynamics, cardiovascular and biochemical effects of succinylcholine when given during electroconvulsive therapy. (ECT). This is a single center, prospective, study in patients who will be receiving ECT as indicated and prescribed by their psychiatrist. The study will be performed twice on each patient, 48-72 hours apart during consecutively scheduled ECT procedures.

    at UCSF

  • Efficacy of Spanish or English Language Versions of Mindfulness Meditation on Depression

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study explores the differential efficacy of Spanish or English versions of a mindfulness intervention on Depression levels, using a pre test post test design and an active control condition (health education).

    at UCLA

  • Evaluation of Depression Symptoms and Brain Activity Associated With Response to Treatment of Depression

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This study will use measurements of depression symptoms and brain activity to determine what factors may influence an individual's response to treatment for depression.

    at UCLA

  • Healthy Hearts Healthy Minds

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Healthy Hearts Healthy Minds: An Overview Individuals with depression are four times more likely to die from coronary heart disease than someone who does not have depression. At the same time, the risk of having a heart attack with depression is double that of individuals who do not have depression. Exercise, improves both depression and risk factors for heart disease; yet, most Americans do not exercise regularly, especially those with depression and/or heart disease. This study is important to these individuals as most of them want to exercise, but have difficulty finding the motivation and energy to do so, which has a substantially negative impact on their physical and mental health. This study will compare two empirically supported treatments designed to help individuals with a mood disorder at risk or with heart disease to increase their physical activity as objectively measured by a Fitbit (which we will provide to participants at no cost). This new study, focused on getting people moving, is funded by the Patient Centered Outcome Research Institute (PCORI) and involves 2 Patient Powered Research Networks (PPRNs) known as the MoodNetwork and the Health eHeart Alliance. With the help of patients across the country the Healthy Hearts Healthy Minds study team aims to be able to study the best method to get people to be more physically active - making them happier and healthier in the process.

    at UCSF

  • Helping patients return to normal life after trauma surgery

    “This study will recognize and help with physical and emotional post-injury concerns.”

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The overarching goal of this UH2-UH3 proposal is to work with the NIH Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory to develop and implement a large scale, cluster randomized pragmatic clinical trial demonstration project that directly informs national trauma care system policy targeting injured patients with presentations of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and related comorbidity. Each year in the United States (US), over 30 million individuals present to trauma centers, emergency departments, and other acute care medical settings for the treatment of physical injuries. Multiple chronic conditions including enduring PTSD, alcohol and drug use problems, depression and associated suicidal ideation, pain and somatic symptom amplification, and chronic medical conditions (e.g., hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes, and pulmonary diseases) are endemic among physical trauma survivors with and without traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Evidence-based, collaborative care/care management treatment models for PTSD and related comorbidities exist. These care management models have the potential to be flexibly implemented in order to prevent the development of chronic PTSD and depressive symptoms, alcohol use problems, and enduring physical disability in survivors of both TBI and non-TBI injuries; care management models may also be effective in mitigating the impact of the acute injury event on symptom exacerbations in the large subpopulation of injury survivors who already carry a substantial pre-injury burden of multiple chronic medical conditions.

    at UC Davis UCLA

  • IMPAACT 2002: Combined Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and a Medication Management Algorithm for Treatment of Depression Among US Youth With HIV

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    IMPAACT 2002 is a prospective, multi-site, two-arm, cluster-randomized study to evaluate whether a health and wellness Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Medication Management (COMB-R) intervention for depression demonstrates improved depression and medical outcomes for HIV-infected youth in the US compared to enhanced standard care (ESC).

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Incidence of Opioid-Induced Respiratory Depression in Medical and Trauma Patients

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The primary objective of this prospective, blinded observational study is to correlate assessment of sedation and respiratory status with capnography and pulse oximetry monitoring in hospitalized adult medical and trauma patients receiving patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or nurse administered intravenous opioids for acute pain. Nursing assessment of respiratory status and sedation level will be correlated with capnography and pulse oximetry values as technology-supported monitoring to identify respiratory depression and opioid-induced sedation. The secondary objective is to identify capnography and pulse oximetry values that correlate with respiratory decompensation and opioid-induced sedation in medical and trauma patients on the general care floor.

    at UCLA

  • Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation for MDD

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will evaluate the effectiveness of intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation for patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    at UCLA

  • Latent Structure of Multi-level Assessments and Predictors of Outcomes for Women in Recovery

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    In this study the investigators will seek to improve their understanding of how positive and negative valence systems, cognition, and arousal/interoception are inter-related in disorders of trauma, mood, substance use, and eating behavior for women involved in a court diversion program in Tulsa, Oklahoma (Women in Recovery). The investigators will recruit 100 individuals and use a wide range of assessment tools, neuroimaging measures, blood and microbiome collections and behavioral tasks to complete the baseline and follow-up study visits. Upon completion, the investigators aim to have robust and reliable dimensional measures that quantify these systems and a set of assessments that should be recommended as a clinical tool to enhance outcome prediction for the clinician and assist in determining who will likely benefit from the diversion program, and to inform future revision or augmentation of the program to increase treatment effectiveness.

    at UCSD

  • Leucine for Depression Study (L-DEP)

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Depression is very common and poses a huge disease burden. About 20% of the US population suffers from depression at lease once in their lifetime. Inflammations that are hidden inside our body as a result of aging, obesity, chronic diseases, or certain treatments (e.g., interferon for hepatitis C) appear to cause depressive symptoms and even clinical depression. Individuals with such inflammations are more likely to suffer from depression and are less likely to respond to currently available antidepressant medications. This study will test leucine, an amino acid, as a new way to mitigate depressive symptoms in response to such inflammations. This study begins with a 90-minute screening session to determine whether participants are eligible to join the main study. Those who meet the eligibility criteria will then join the main study, which will consist of taking leucine or maltodextrin (i.e., oral placebo) for 2 weeks at home and an 8-hour session at the UCLA Medical Center. A brief telephone follow-up every 3 months for 2 years with questions on mood is also planned. Approximately 90 healthy adults will be recruited for participation in the study. During the course of the study, participants will take leucine or maltodextrin for 2 weeks at home and then will be injected either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline (i.e., intravenous placebo) at the UCLA Medical Center. LPS is a bacterial substance that can initiate chemical reactions that are similar to those seen in individuals with mild sickness symptoms, such as a slight increase in body temperature, muscle aches, or tiredness. It is a safe way of investigating the body's response to inflammation and how these changes may alter cognitive, emotional, or neural function. It has been given thousands of times to healthy volunteers - both younger and older adults - without any serious side effects.

    at UCLA

  • Mobile Web-based Behavioral Intervention for Improving Caregiver Well-being

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Caregivers suffer great amounts of distress that significantly impacts their mental and physical well-being, yet caregivers' access to quality, evidence-based care is currently very limited. The public health significance of the proposed study is that our internet and mobile-based web intervention will (1) significantly reduce caregiver distress and improve caregivers' overall well-being, and (2) dramatically increase caregivers' access to high quality, evidence-based care at relatively low cost.

    at UCSD

  • My Coach Connect: An Automated Telephone-based Reporting System for Patients With Mental Illness

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a pilot study for a novel, automated telephone system called "My Coach Connect". The purpose of the study is to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this telephone tool while engaging clients and providers in discussion groups and surveys to better understand how this tool impacts the care provided and their overall experience in healthcare.

    at UCLA

  • Pediatric Open-Label Extension Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, 104-week, multicenter, extension study designed to evaluate the long-term safety, tolerability and effectiveness of flexibly dosed lurasidone (20, 40, 60 or 80 mg/day) in pediatric subjects who have completed the 6-week treatment period in the preceding studies, D1050301, D1050325, and D1050326

    at UCSF

  • PERsonal ContExtual Precision healTh

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The exponential growth of physiological, behavioral and environmental data generated through consumer mobile health (mHealth) devices and Internet of Things (IoT) technology provide unprecedented sources of personalized and contextual health information. If linked to clinical health data from the Electronic Health Record (EHR), these data can provide dynamic and individualized views of patient health states and trajectories that can greatly inform clinical care and health-related research. The investigators propose to advance precision health through the development and evaluation of a mobile application and data platform that collects, harmonizes and integrates mHealth and environmental data from patients' daily lives with their clinical histories and electronic health record data. The investigators propose a participatory design approach to implement and evaluate a precision health platform through the study and modeling of hypertension (HTN) and depression in patient communities of UC Davis (UCD) and UC San Francisco (UCSF). These chronic diseases have high prevalence across geography, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity, and have significant economic, societal and personal costs. They are considerably challenging to manage due to difficulties in acquiring high-quality and consistent data from patients outside of their clinical care appointments that is so needed for a full view of the patient's disease state. Despite a broad array of self-monitoring devices and consumer applications, mHealth data are not getting into the clinical care process, and patients do not regularly monitor their own health states, particularly during periods of medication change, when frequent assessments are especially important. The investigators propose to conduct a 6-month single arm feasibility study of 200 ambulatory men and women (100 each at UCSF and UCD) with either hypertension or depression to implement an open, web-accessible, standards driven and patient-centric data platform for the integration of patient-reported and clinical data.

    at UCSF UC Davis

  • PRIME Care (PRecision Medicine In MEntal Health Care)

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The focus of this application is on the impact of providing depressed Veterans and their providers with the results of pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing for psychotropic medications. The project focuses on whether and how patients and providers use genetic test results given to them at the time an antidepressant is to be initiated to treat Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and whether use of the test results improves patient outcomes. MDD is one of the most common conditions associated with military service and combat exposure, increases suicide risk, and worsens the course of common medical conditions, making it a leading cause of functional impairment and mortality. Validation of a PGx test to personalize the treatment of MDD represents an important opportunity to improve the healthcare of Veterans.

    at UCSF

  • Project Bridge: Peer Health Navigator Intervention

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The mortality rate among people with Serious Mental Illness (SMI) is 2 to 3 times that of the general population, meaning that those with a serious mental illness die, on average, 25 years earlier than those without an SMI. These deaths are largely attributed to preventable medical conditions, many of which are more common in the SMI population. The "Bridge" intervention is a peer navigator model that was developed to target factors that negatively impact healthcare access, utilization, and outcomes among individuals with serious mental illness (e.g., severe mood disorders and psychotic disorders). This intervention targets male and female, adult consumers across races/ethnicities and has been utilized by Pacific Clinics (Southern California's largest behavioral healthcare agency) and the Department of Mental Health of Los Angeles County to improve the health and quality of life for their consumers. Investigators will test the comparative effectiveness of a peer navigator intervention (the Bridge) to treatment as usual. The Bridge navigator intervention is designed to teach SMI consumers the skills to engage health care providers and to overcome motivational deficits in order to improve their health and healthcare use. The specific aims of this application are: 1. To use randomized methods to examine the effectiveness of the Bridge intervention on the health care utilization, satisfaction with care, health status, and health care self-management for a sample of individuals with severe mental illness receiving public mental health services in the community; 2. To use randomized methods to examine the effectiveness of the Bridge intervention on psychological and social well-being for a sample of individuals with severe mental illness receiving public mental health services in the community. Up to 146 participants in an Full Service Partnership (FSP) clinic operated by Pacific Clinics will be recruited to participate in an approximately 24 month long study of Bridge navigation. Participants will be randomly assigned to either treatment as usual (waitlist) or immediate intervention with the Bridge. Participants in both groups will complete three assessments (baseline, 6 months, 12 months) and statistically compared over time. Staff stakeholders (n = 20) will also be interviewed at baseline and every three months of the study in order to ensure that the intervention is being implemented appropriately.

    at UCLA

  • Psilocybin-assisted Group Therapy for Demoralization in Long-term AIDS Survivors

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    The purpose of this study is to determine whether psilocybin-assisted group psychotherapy is a safe and feasible treatment for demoralization in long-term AIDS survivors (LTAS).

    at UCSF

  • Resilience Against Depression Disparities (Also Known as Resilience Education to Reduce Depression Disparities)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Depressive symptoms and disorders are among the most common adult health conditions with a lifetime prevalence of 15-20% and are a leading cause of disability /morbidity worldwide. Although evidence-based approaches such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), antidepressant medications, and depression collaborative care and quality improvement (QI) programs integrating depression care into primary health care can improve depression outcomes and disparities, racial / ethnic disparities continue to persist. Concurrently, according to a 2011 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, little information exists on how to address the high rates of depression among sexual and gender minorities. Our study randomizes depressed, LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, queer), racial / ethnic minority adults to an evidence-based agency-level, depression quality improvement (QI) training [Resources for Services (RS)] and technical support alone or to a resiliency class (RC+), a 7-session resiliency, cognitive behavioral therapy class to enhance mood + automated mobile text reminders about basic reminders and care follow-up impact on improving adult patients' depressive symptoms. Depression QI (RS) training will be offered to three clusters of four to five LGBTQ-focused programs: two clusters in LA (Hollywood and South LA) and one cluster in NO. Clusters are comprised of one primary care, one mental health, and two to three community agencies (e.g., faith-based, social services/support, advocacy). All programs will receive depression QI training. Enrolled adult depressed patients (n=320) will be randomized individually to RC+ or RS (depression QI) alone to assess effects on primary outcomes: depressive symptoms [8-item patient health questionnaire (PHQ-8) score and secondary outcomes: mental health quality of life [12-item mental composite score (MCS-12) ≤ 40], Resilience (Brief Resilience Scale), mental wellness, and physical health quality of life [12-item physical composite (PCS-12)score] at 6- and 12-month follow-up.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Safety and Effectiveness of NeuroStar® Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) Therapy in Depressed Adolescents

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of daily, active Neurostar® TMS (when compared with sham treatment) in adolescents meeting criteria for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD).

    at UCLA

  • Survivorship Care in Reducing Symptoms in Young Adult Cancer Survivors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized clinical trial studies survivorship care in reducing symptoms in young adult cancer survivors. Survivorship care programs that identify the needs of young adult cancer survivors and ways to support them through the years after treatment may help reduce symptoms, such as pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and distress, in young adult cancer survivors.

    at UCLA

  • Trial of Levomilnacipran in Geriatric Depression

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    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of levomilnacipran (FETZIMA) compared to placebo for the treatment of depression in older adults.

    at UCLA

  • Vortioxetine, 5, 10, and 20 mg, Relapse Prevention Study in Adults With Major Depressive Disorder

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of vortioxetine (5, 10, and 20 mg) versus placebo during the first 28 weeks of the 32-week double-blind treatment period in the prevention of relapse in participants with major depressive disorder (MDD) who responded to acute treatment with vortioxetine 10 mg.

    at UCSD

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