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Depression clinical trials at University of California Health

87 in progress, 49 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Neuroimaging Study of Open-label Placebo in Depressed Adolescents

    open to eligible people ages 13-18

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the current leading cause of disability worldwide and adolescence is an especially vulnerable period for the onset of depression. Non-pharmacologic approaches are particularly attractive as treatment of adolescent depression due to the elevated risks of side effects related to the use of psychotropic drugs during development. A recent meta-analysis detected a positive and significant effect of non-deceptive placebos (open-label placebo, OLP) for a series of clinical conditions, including adult depression. To the investigators' knowledge, no studies of OLP have been conducted in depressed adolescents to date, although placebo response rates in adolescent depression are especially high, accounting for over 80% of the actual response to antidepressant treatment. The study's main objective is to estimate the effectiveness and understand the mechanism of OLP in depressed adolescents. The central hypothesis is that the mechanism by which OLP exerts its action in adolescent depression is by forming a positive expectation, which activates endogenous mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-mediated neurotransmission in a network of regions implicated in emotion, stress regulation, and the pathophysiology of MDD, namely, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) - striato - amygdalo - thalamic network. The hypothesis has been formulated on the basis of published research and preliminary data. The investigators will test the hypothesis by performing structural and functional neuroimaging in 60 untreated 13-18 year-old adolescents with mild to moderate depression. The proposed research is significant, because it is expected to elucidate the mechanism of action of OLP and advance the understanding of the neural underpinnings of positive expectations in adolescent depression.

    at UCSF

  • A Prospective, Multi-center, Randomized Controlled Blinded Trial Demonstrating the Safety and Effectiveness of VNS Therapy® System as Adjunctive Therapy Versus a No Stimulation Control in Subjects With Treatment-Resistant Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Objectives of this study are to determine whether active VNS Therapy treatment is superior to a no stimulation control in producing a reduction in baseline depressive symptom severity, based on multiple depression scale assessment tools at 12 months from randomization.

    at UCSD

  • A Study of Esketamine Nasal Spray, Administered as Monotherapy, in Adult Participants With Treatment-resistant Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of each individual dose of esketamine nasal spray, 56 milligram (mg) and 84 mg, compared with placebo nasal spray in improving depressive symptoms in participants with treatment resistant depression (TRD), as assessed by the change from baseline in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score from Day 1 (prerandomization) to the end of the 4 week double-blind treatment phase (Day 28).

    at UCSD UCSF

  • A Study of Seltorexant Compared to Quetiapine XR as Adjunctive Therapy to Antidepressants in Adult and Elderly Participants With Major Depressive Disorder With Insomnia Symptoms Who Have Responded Inadequately to Antidepressant Therapy

    open to eligible people ages 18-74

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of seltorexant compared with quetiapine extended-release (XR) as adjunctive therapy to an antidepressant drug in treatment response in participants with major depressive disorder with insomnia symptoms (MDDIS) who have had an inadequate response to current antidepressant therapy with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI).

    at UCSD UCSF

  • A Study of the Change in Disease State and Safety of Oral Cariprazine Capsules in the Treatment of Depression in Pediatric Participants (10 to 17 Years of Age) With Bipolar I Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 10-17

    Bipolar disorder is a severe chronic mood disorder that affects up to 4% of the adult population and 1.8% of the pediatric population in the United States. The treatment of the depressive episodes of bipolar disorder in the pediatric population has not been as widely studied as the treatment of depressive episodes in bipolar disorder in adults, therefore pharmacotherapeutic options are limited. Given the change in disease state and safety demonstrated in adults with depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the change in disease state and safety of cariprazine in the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in the pediatric population. Cariprazine is an approved drug for the treatment of depressive episodes in adult participants with bipolar I disorder. Study doctors put participants in 1 of 2 groups, called treatment arms. There is a 1 in 2 chance that a participant will be assigned to placebo. Around 380 Participants ages 10-17 years with bipolar I disorder will be enrolled in approximately 60 sites worldwide. Participants receiving the study drug will receive Dose A or B of Cariprazine based on age and weight. At Week 3, participants with insufficient response will have their dose increased to Dose B or Dose C, while participants with sufficient response will continue receiving the Dose A or B for the remainder of the treatment period. The treatment period will be followed by a safety follow-up (SFU) period for 4 weeks. There may be higher treatment burden for participants in this trial compared to their standard of care. Participants will attend regular weekly visits during the study at a hospital or clinic. The effect of the treatment will be checked by medical assessments, blood tests, checking for side effects and completing questionnaires.

    at UCSD

  • Accelerated Theta Burst Stimulation for Suicidal Ideation

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    This is a prospective clinical trial to confirm the effectiveness of bilateral accelerated theta burst stimulation (aTBS) on suicidal ideation (SI), while exploring cortical inhibition measures in this treatment paradigm. In this proposed study, the investigators will evaluate the anti-suicidal effects of bilateral aTBS over the DLPFC compared to accelerated intermittent theta burst stimulation (aiTBS) over the left DLPFC in participants with TRD and SI. Additionally, the investigators aim to identify neurophysiological targets through which bilateral aTBS induces remission of SI in TRD differentially from aiTBS.

    at UCSD

  • Adapting and Examining Collaborative Decision Skills Training Among Veterans With Serious Mental Illness

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Recovery-oriented care is an imperative for the VA, particularly in mental health programming for Veterans with serious mental illness (SMI). Collaborative decision-making (CDM) is a recovery-oriented approach to treatment decision-making that assigns equal participation and obligation to patients and providers across all aspects of decision-making, thereby empowering patients and facilitating better decision-making based on patient values and preferences. CDM is associated with several important outcomes including improved treatment engagement, treatment satisfaction, and social functioning. However, current levels of CDM among Veterans with SMI are low, and there is not yet an evidence-based method to improve CDM. Improving Veteran skill sets associated with engaging in CDM is a potential intervention strategy. Collaborative Decision Skills Training (CDST) is a promising new intervention that was previously developed by the applicant for use in adult civilians with SMI and found to improve relevant skills and improve sense of personal recovery. The proposed study has two primary stages. First, a small, one-armed, open label trial will establish CDST's feasibility will evaluate CDST among 12 Veterans with SMI receiving services at the VA San Diego Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center (PRRC) and identify and complete any needed adaptations to CDST. Stakeholder feedback from Veterans, VA clinicians, and VA administrators will be collected to assess Veteran needs and service context to identify any needed adaptations to the CDST manual or the delivery of CDST to maximize its impact and feasibility. The developers of CDST will review all feedback and make final decisions about adaptations to ensure that CDST retains its essential components to protect against loss of efficacy. For example, a recommendation to adjust role-play topics to better reflect the needs of Veterans would be accepted because it would increase CDST's relevance without impairing its integrity, but a recommendation to remove all role-plays would not be accepted because it would cause loss of a key component. Second, CDST will be compared to active control (AC) using a randomized clinical trial of 72 Veterans. The primary outcome measure will be functioning within the rehabilitation context, operationalized as frequency of Veteran CDM behaviors during Veteran-provider interactions. Secondary outcomes are treatment attendance, engagement, satisfaction, and motivation, along with treatment outcomes (i.e., rehabilitation goal attainment, sense of personal recovery, symptom severity, and social functioning). Three exploratory outcomes will be assessed: Veteran-initiated collaborative behaviors, acute service use and provider attitudes and behavior. Veterans will be randomly assigned to CDST or AC conditions. Veterans in the both groups will attend eight hour-long group sessions held over eight weeks. All Veterans will complete an assessment battery at baseline, post-intervention, and at three-month post-intervention follow-up. Following the trial and adaptation phase, the findings will be used to develop a CDST service delivery manual and design a logical subsequent study. The results of the proposed study will inform the potential for larger trials of CDST and the utility of providing CDST broadly to Veterans with SMI. The results of this study will expand current understanding of CDM among Veterans with SMI by providing data that will: 1) identify adaptations needed to optimize CDST for Veterans receiving services in PRRCs; 2) identify possible benefits of CDST; 3) inform development of alternate interventions or methods to improve CDM; and 4) further elucidate CDM and associated treatment processes among Veterans with SMI receiving VA rehabilitation services.

    at UCSD

  • Affect Treatment for Depression and Anxiety

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and mediators of change in Positive Affect Treatment, a psychotherapy specifically aimed at enhancing reward sensitivity in individuals with low positive affect (a core feature of anhedonia) in the context of depression or anxiety. Target enrollment is 100 male and female participants with low positive affect and depression or anxiety and impaired functioning, between the ages of 18 and 65 years, who will be randomized to either Positive Affect Treatment or Negative Affect Treatment (designed to reduce threat sensitivity). Participants will complete laboratory tests, psychiatric assessments, and self-report questionnaires as part of the study. The total length of participation is around 5 months.

    at UCLA

  • Aging and Reward System Response to Inflammation and Anxiety Study

    open to eligible people ages 60-80

    The purpose of this study is to use an experimental inflammatory challenge to examine whether older adults with symptoms of anxiety experience loss of pleasure or loss of motivation when they are exposed to inflammation. Loss of pleasure or loss of motivation will be evaluated using self-report questionnaires, computer tasks, and during a brain scan.

    at UCLA

  • Amplification of Positivity to Enhance Social Connections in Anxiety and Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-55

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a novel transdiagnostic behavioral treatment -- Amplification of Positivity (AMP) -- intended to enhance positive social connections in individuals with elevated anxiety and/or depression. Social relationship impairments are common and debilitating consequences of anxiety and depression. Existing treatments have some beneficial impact on social functioning; however, many people continue to have few and/or poor quality relationships following treatment, even after experiencing symptom relief. This study will evaluate the effects of AMP on the brain systems that have been shown to be important for establishing positive connections with others. Approximately 100 individuals (ages 18-55) seeking treatment for anxiety or depression will participate in this study. Participants will be randomly assigned with equal probability to either AMP or stress management training (SMT) (6 sessions each). Participants will be assessed at baseline and post-treatment and compared on measures assessing brain responses to social reward (primary outcome), as well as physiological, behavioral, and emotional responses to social reward (secondary outcomes). It is hypothesized that the AMP group will experience greater increases from pre- to post-treatment in activity in brain systems that regulate the processing of social reward cues (e.g., striatum) relative to participants in the SMT group. It is also hypothesized that changes in brain activation to social reward from pre- to post-treatment will be correlated with the degree of improvement in social connectedness.

    at UCSD

  • An Inflammatory Challenge Using Endotoxin

    open to eligible people ages 21-45

    The study design consists of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of low dose endotoxin. The low dose endotoxin challenge induces a transient systemic inflammatory response with normalization of cytokine levels within hours. This "phasic" inflammation is distinct from chronic ("tonic") levels of inflammation that may be present with AUD. A total of 38 non-treatment seeking heavy drinking men and women and 38 light drinking healthy controls will participate in the study. Recruitment will be monitored to ensure the two groups are matched by gender. Eligible participants will be randomly assigned, stratified by gender and BDI-II severity, to receive a single I.V. infusion of either low dose endotoxin (0.8 ng/kg of body weight) or placebo (same volume of 0.9% saline solution) at the UCLA Outpatient Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC). All participants will complete an alcohol cue-exposure paradigm and reward responsiveness assessment 2 hours post infusion, which is the time of expected peak cytokine response. All participants will also complete an fMRI alcohol cue-reactivity paradigm at 3 hours post infusion. Plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines [i.e., Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α)], mood, and alcohol craving, will be assessed at baseline and then hourly for four hours post infusion.

    at UCLA

  • Aripiprazole Lauroxil for Preventing Psychotic Relapse After an Initial Schizophrenia Episode

    open to eligible people ages 18-45

    This 12-month study will evaluate the efficacy of aripiprazole lauroxil compared to oral aripiprazole in preventing the re-emergence of psychotic symptoms in patients with a recent onset of schizophrenia.

    at UCLA

  • Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up and Depression Treatment

    open to eligible females ages 2 years and up

    Maternal depression influences the development of children's behavior problems and vice versa; however most interventions singularly address maternal depression or children's behavior problems rather than both. This project assesses the efficacy of an intervention that treats both mothers and children in an integrated manner. Effects are expected to disrupt the reciprocal relations that perpetuate maternal and child mental health problems over time.

    at UCSF

  • Azithromycin for Meibomian Gland Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study aims to elucidate the effectiveness of oral azithromycin in treating symptomatic dry eye syndrome secondary to Meibomian gland dysfunction.

    at UCSF

  • Biomarkers of Depression and Treatment Response

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    This study is a stratified, parallel-group, single-center study utilizing multimodal imaging techniques to identify biomarkers for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The study goal is to identify biomarkers for MDD and treatment response that can be implemented in clinical diagnosis and care as valid and reliable measures, through monitoring neurophysiological and electrophysiological changes across the course of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) treatment.

    at UCSF

  • Bipolar Efficacy Biomarkers for rTMS

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    The research study is being conducted to test whether using high dose spaced theta-burst rTMS (a form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation) produces a significant reduction in depressive symptoms compared with sham. This project will recruit patients aged 18-70 with symptoms of bipolar depression (BPD) who have failed (or not shown signs of improvement) after at least two prior treatments. The null hypothesis is that there will be no difference in reductions in depressive symptoms by the end of a five-day treatment period. The alternative hypothesis is that, compared with sham, active TMS will result in a greater reduction in depressive symptoms by the end of the treatment period. To facilitate the development of rTMS protocols there is a need for biomarkers that are sensitive to BPD symptom severity and clinical improvement. Previously in our lab, investigators developed biomarkers suitable for depression trials, and these biomarkers are very likely to show sensitivity to BPD, since they are associated with brain regions and functions associated with BPD. As a secondary aim, the investigators will try to identify biomarkers in cortical region associated with BPD, and formulate a statistical model that may be able to predict BPD remission after the treatment. this study will lead to development of new brain stimulation treatment protocols and biomarkers, will aid in treatment selection, and eventually lead to better clinical outcome for patients suffering from BPD.

    at UCSD

  • Cellular Aging and Neurobiology of Depression Study

    open to eligible people ages 21-60

    We are conducting an eight week longitudinal study to learn if blood levels of certain naturally occurring compounds and genetic markers differ between patients with depression and healthy adults who are not depressed, and if any such differences relate to memory performance, mood, and neurobiology. We will do this by comparing the unmedicated depressed patients with matched healthy controls at baseline and then following the depressed patients over the course of eight weeks of standardized antidepressant treatment to gauge which baseline abnormalities normalize over the course of treatment.

    at UCSF

  • Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Major Depression

    open to eligible people ages 22-70

    Neurons are specialized types of cells that are responsible for carrying out the functions of the brain. Neurons communicate with electrical signals. In diseases such as major depression this electrical communication can go awry. One way to change brain function is using electrical stimulation to help alter the communication between groups of neurons in the brain. The purpose of this study is to test a personalized approach to brain stimulation as an intervention for depression. The study researchers will use a surgically implanted device to measure each individual's brain activity related to his/her depression. The researchers will then use small electrical impulses to alter that brain activity and measure whether these changes help reduce depression symptoms. This study is intended for patients with major depression whose symptoms have not been adequately treated with currently available therapies. The device used in this study is called the NeuroPace Responsive Neurostimulation (RNS) System. It is currently FDA approved to treat patients with epilepsy. The study will test whether personalized responsive neurostimulation can safely and effectively treat depression.

    at UCSF

  • Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery From Other Stresses

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery from Other Stresses (CLARO) is a five-year project that tests whether delivering care using a collaborative model helps patients with both opioid use disorders and mental health disorders.

    at UCLA

  • Combined Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Therapy for mTBI Related Headaches

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study will assess the combined effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and telehealth based therapy in helping manage mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) related headaches. The investigators hypothesize that active rTMS combined with telehealth therapy will provide marked reduction in mTBI related headaches and symptoms in comparison to their placebo counterparts.

    at UCSD

  • Compassion Meditation vs. Health Education for Veterans

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Chronic pain (CP) is a major health problem for military Veterans, and CP is often associated with comorbid mental health problems, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. CP with psychological comorbidity is associated with increased healthcare costs, medication use, risk of suicide and rates of disability and reduced quality of life. Current empirically supported treatments do not always lead to substantial improvements (up to 50% of patients drop out or are do not respond to treatment). This project was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel intervention for addressing these challenges. Compassion meditation (CM), a meditative practice that focuses on the wish to remove suffering, is a contemplative practice that has promise for the amelioration of physical and mental health problems as well as promoting positive affect and improving quality of life. This study will evaluate the efficacy of Cognitively-Based Compassion Training for Chronic Pain with Psychological Comorbidity (CBCT-CP+) compared to Health Education while Living with Pain (H.E.L.P.) control condition, in a sample of among Veterans with CP conditions and psychological comorbidity.

    at UCSD

  • Effectiveness and Implementation of eScreening in Post 9/11 Transition Programs

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Electronic screening is effective for timely detection of, and intervention for, suicidal ideation and other mental health symptoms. The VA eScreening program is a patient self-report electronic screening system that has shown promise for the efficient and effective collection of mental and physical health information among Veterans. However, additional effectiveness and implementation research is warranted to evaluate the impact of eScreening within VHA. This study will address questions of the impact of eScreening compared to screening as usual, while evaluating a multi-component implementation strategy (MCIS) for optimal enterprise rollout of eScreening in VA Transition Care Management clinics.

    at UCSD

  • Engaging Mothers & Babies; Reimagining Antenatal Care for Everyone (EMBRACE) Study

    open to eligible females

    This is a randomized comparative effectiveness study of two forms of enhanced prenatal care among 2,600 Medi-Cal eligible pregnant women in Fresno, California. The goal is to see whether group prenatal care with wrap around services versus individual prenatal care supplemented by services covered by the California Department of Public Health Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program (CPSP) results in lower rates of preterm birth, less depression and anxiety, and more respectful and greater satisfaction with prenatal care.

    at UCSF

  • Enhancing Transdiagnostic Mechanisms of Cognitive Dyscontrol

    open to eligible people ages 21-55

    The proposed project aims to test the cognitive and neural effects of a cognitive training in a sample of individuals seeking treatment for anxiety, depression, or traumatic stress symptoms. Participants will be randomly assigned to a high dose, low dose, or assessment only condition. Participants will be compared on cognitive performance and brain response during cognitive tasks from baseline to post-treatment.

    at UCSD

  • Examine the Effects of Mindfulness in Woman With a History of Child Adversity

    open to eligible females ages 30-50

    The aim of this pilot Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) is to test whether brief mindfulness-based practices will improve well-being and health in women (age 30-50) with a history of early life adversity. Following a baseline visit (remotely via Zoom), participants are randomized (50% probability) to either a Mindful Activity group or a Mindful Awareness group. In the Mindful Activity group, participants will complete brief (approximately 5-10 min) audio-guided mindfulness practices twice a day (morning and evening) for 8 weeks using the study app. This is followed by a brief survey about their current thoughts and feelings. In the Mindful Awareness group, participants are asked to be mindful (pay attention) to their thoughts and feelings twice a day (morning and evening) for 8 weeks using the study app. After the 8-week intervention period, all participants complete a follow-up visit (remotely). Primary goals of the pilot RCT are to test acceptability, feasibility, and adherence.

    at UCSF

  • Feasibility & Acceptability of a Virtual Sister Circle Intervention for Black Women With Depressive Symptoms

    open to eligible females ages 40 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a protocol for middle- and older-aged Black women with depressive symptoms.

    at UCLA

  • HypErthermia as an Additional Treatment for the Biology and Experience of Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This single-arm intervention trial administers up to 4 bi-weekly whole-body hyperthermia (WBH) sessions and 8 weekly cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions to adults aged 18 years or older with major depressive disorder (MDD).

    at UCSF

  • Individualized Neuromodulation for Anhedonic Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    This program of research constitutes a three-arm, randomized, placebo-controlled trial testing noninvasive brain stimulation for the treatment of anhedonic depression. This trial is part of a larger, three-site study that will be conducted at UCSD, Stanford University, and Cornell University, with the overarching goals to compare competing interventions tested at each site and to combine data that will allow for the creation of an end-to-end model of anhedonic depression. By doing this, the investigators hope to gain insight and lead to the development of brain-behavior biomarkers to identify who is best suited for the different treatment options tested at each site. An additional exploratory objective is phenotyping anhedonic depression from the acquired measures. Anhedonic patients recruited at UCSD will be randomized to one of three treatment arms to receive different forms of accelerated intermittent theta burst stimulation (aiTBS),a novel form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) that is an FDA approved treatment for depression. These arms include: individualized accelerated iTBS (Ind-aiTBS),based on both the frequency of brain responses and electric-field (e-field) modeling of brain bioconductivity; standard accelerated iTBS (Std-aiTBS); and accelerated sham iTBS(sham). Treatment will be delivered on an accelerated schedule, over one week. Additional study sessions will occur both before and after treatment to assess for clinical, neurophysiological, and cognitive measures that will allow for both individualization of treatment and detailed assessment of the effects of the different treatment arms.

    at UCSD

  • Intergenerational Transmission of Traumatic Stress

    open to eligible people ages 3 years and up

    Millions of U.S. parents have experienced trauma, putting them at risk for maladaptive parenting practices, which then confer vulnerabilities to their children. This study aims to enhance understanding of how parental emotional dysregulation associated with traumatic stress impedes effective parenting. The study employs neurophysiological methods (electroencephalogram; EEG) to address some of the challenges inherent in the study of emotion (particularly in trauma-exposed individuals) and to identify potential biomarkers of traumatic stress and response to intervention.

    at UCLA

  • Low-Dose Intravenous Ketamine for Adolescents With Depression and Suicidal Ideation in the Emergency Department

    open to eligible people ages 12-18

    The goal of this study is to test whether a single low-dose of IV ketamine given in the emergency department to adolescents with treatment-resistant depression and suicidal ideation can reduce depression symptoms and suicidal thoughts compared to placebo. Participants will complete depression scales at baseline, and 1 hour, 3 hours, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days after receiving the treatment.

    at UCSD

  • Meditation Accelerated Brain Stimulation for Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Repetitive Transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an FDA-approved treatment for depression that involves brief magnetic stimulation pulses on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) brain region. The ultimate goal of this treatment is to increase excitability and long-term plasticity in DLPFC, a brain region shown to be hypo-active in depression. Unfortunately, rTMS only has low to moderate efficacy; remission rates for patients range from ~15-30% in large randomized controlled trials. The focus of this research is to develop a next-generation rTMS protocol that is guided by the basic principles underlying brain plasticity, in order to improve the efficacy of rTMS for the treatment of depression. Specifically, in this study the investigators will test rTMS paired with a depression-relevant cognitive state of internal attention.

    at UCSD

  • Mindfulness Meditation Neuroimaging Study for Undergraduates

    open to all eligible people

    This study is designed to test the effectiveness of mindfulness meditation intervention classes on psychosocial health outcomes. Additionally, the investigators would like to examine changes in the brain that might occur following the mindfulness meditation intervention. The investigators are particularly interested in changes in brain activity that are correlated with changes in inflammation-related markers in the blood. The nervous system and immune system are closely connected, and both are influenced by mindfulness. However, it is unclear whether changes in neural activity are linked with changes in inflammation. A compelling feature of mindfulness interventions is their potential for reducing inflammatory activity; however, this has not been examined in college students. In addition to measuring psychosocial outcomes, the investigators will employ sophisticated, vertically-integrated measures of inflammatory biology that allow the study team to probe intervention effects on circulating markers of inflammation. Thus, the investigators intend to recruit 60 undergraduate students and will randomize them into either a 6-week standardized mindfulness intervention or to a wait-list control group. Participants will complete brain scans, provide blood samples for immune analysis, and complete questionnaires at pre- and post-intervention assessments

    at UCLA

  • Mobile Web-based Behavioral Intervention for Improving Caregiver Well-being

    open to eligible people ages 40 years and up

    Caregivers suffer great amounts of distress that significantly impacts their mental and physical well-being, yet caregivers' access to quality, evidence-based care is currently very limited. The public health significance of the proposed study is that our internet and mobile-based web intervention will (1) significantly reduce caregiver distress and improve caregivers' overall well-being, and (2) dramatically increase caregivers' access to high quality, evidence-based care at relatively low cost.

    at UCSD

  • New Moms Mood Tracking & Wellbeing

    open to eligible females ages 18-65

    New moms can be at risk for perinatal depression (PND). The New Moms Mood Tracking and Wellbeing study is investigating mood changes, risk factors for depression and anxiety and treatment response around the time of delivery. Participants will be asked to complete three sets of online surveys between week 28 gestation and week 20 after delivery, in addition to downloading an app to collect data using their smartphone sensors and brief symptom surveys every other week. Women with elevated symptoms can participate in treatment. Women will be randomized to one of two conditions - Perinatal Psychiatric Care or Screening and Treatment for Anxiety and Depression (STAND). In Perinatal Psychiatric Care, participants will receive appointments with psychiatry clinicians. In STAND, participants will be further allocated to Online therapy with Coaching or Clinical Care, which includes both psychotherapy and psychiatry appointments. Treatment can last up to 6 months and there will be treatment related assessments for the duration of the 6 months, in addition to brief symptom surveys on a regular basis. Therefore, participation can last between 24 and 52 weeks, as both time of delivery and treatment enrollment timepoint cannot be scheduled in advance.

    at UCLA

  • Pilot Study of Mirtazapine for the Dual Tx of Depression and CINV in High-Grade Glioma Pts on TMZ

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of the study is to estimate the ability of mirtazapine to reduce depression, nausea, and vomiting, and maintain weight in depressed glioma patients undergoing Temozolomide (TMZ) therapy. Of equal importance, the investigators will monitor the tolerability of Mirtazapine in these patients over the course of the study.

    at UC Irvine

  • Psilocybin Therapy for Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease

    open to eligible people ages 40-75

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety, tolerability, and feasibility of psilocybin therapy for depression and anxiety in people with Parkinson's disease.

    at UCSF

  • Psilocybin Therapy for Depression in Bipolar II Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 30-65

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety, tolerability, and feasibility of psilocybin therapy in people with Bipolar II Disorder.

    at UCSF

  • rTMS in Alleviating Pain and Co-Morbid Symptoms in Gulf War Veterans Illness (GWVI)

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study aims to look at the effectiveness of using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in relieving pain and other co-morbid symptoms of Gulf War Illness.

    at UCSD

  • Rural Dementia Caregiver Project

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    These caregivers are a vulnerable group due to their physical isolation and well-documented rural disparities in health care access and quality. Many rural dementia caregivers experience serious health consequences due to caregiving responsibilities that can limit their ability to maintain their caregiving role. Thus, there is a pressing need for effective, scalable, and accessible programs to support rural dementia caregivers. Online programs offer a convenient and readily translatable option for program delivery because they can be accessed by caregivers in the home and at the convenience of the user. Building Better Caregivers is an online 6-week, interactive, small-group self-management, social support, and skills-building workshop developed for caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease or related dementia. The investigators will conduct a hybrid effectiveness-implementation randomized controlled trial that will enroll and randomize 640 rural dementia caregivers into two groups: the intervention (workshop) group and the attention control group. Caregivers will be recruited throughout the United States. Primary outcomes will be caregiver stress and depression symptoms. The investigators hypothesize that stress scores and depression symptoms will be significantly improved at 12 months in the intervention group versus control group. The investigators will also identify key strengths (facilitators) and weaknesses (barriers) of workshop implementation. The investigators will use the RE-AIM implementation framework and a mixed methods approach to identify implementation characteristics pertinent to both caregivers and rural community organizations. If the Building Better Caregivers workshop is proven to be effective, this research has the potential to open new research horizons, particularly on how to reach and effectively support isolated dementia caregivers in rural areas with an intervention that is scalable, even in low-resourced settings. If the workshop can achieve its goals with rural dementia caregivers, some of those most isolated, it would also be expected to be scalable in other low-resourced settings (e.g., in urban or suburban environments).

    at UCSF

  • Sleep and Healthy Aging Research for Depression (SHARE-D) Study

    open to eligible people ages 60-90

    Late-life depression is a significant public health concern, and effective interventions for prevention and treatment are needed. Insomnia and inflammation are modifiable targets for depression prevention, and this study is significant in using an experimental approach (i.e., inflammatory challenge) to probe acute inflammatory- and depression responses as a function of insomnia, which will inform identification of molecular targets for pharmacologic interventions, and improvement of insomnia treatments to prevent depression in older adults. Project

    at UCLA

  • Telepsychology in Spinal Cord Injury

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will determine the effectiveness of tele-psychology in treating persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) with depressed mood in the early period post-rehabilitation discharge. Depression among individuals with SCI is the most common psychological condition following an injury; 22% of civilians with SCI and 28% of veterans with SCI experience depression after injury, which is higher than the able-bodied population (Williams 2015; Ullrich 2014). Individuals with SCI face many barriers in receiving psychotherapy, such as lack of accessible transportation, unfamiliarity with community resources, or stigma associated with seeking treatment for depression, which this project aims to address. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), which helps people develop different ways of thinking and behaving to reduce their psychological distress, will be provided via iPad FaceTime by a psychologist with expertise in working with persons with SCI. The objectives of the proposed project are to reduce depressive symptoms, decrease associated symptoms of anxiety, and to improve satisfaction with life with CBT provided via tele-psychology. The secondary objective is to show intermediate efficacy of tele-psychology in persons with SCI with depressed mood.

    at UCSF

  • The MOOD Study - External Combined Occipital and Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation (eCOT-NS) for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    The MOOD study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of a noninvasive, self-administered external Combined Occipital and Trigeminal Neurostimulation (eCOT-NS) treatment for Major Depressive Disorder (Relivion®DP). This is a prospective, multi-center, 2-arm randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, sham-controlled study. The study will include the following stages: 1. Screening, Eligibility evaluation and Randomization to Relivion®DP vs. Sham control (1:1 randomization) (Baseline - Day 0). 2. Daily treatment period: Active/Sham (Group A/B) treatment protocol (Baseline to end of 8 weeks). 3. Open label phase: Active treatment period of additional 8 weeks. After completion of the open label period the subject's participation in the study will be over.

    at UCLA

  • The Reducing Risk Study

    open to eligible people ages 12-18

    The present study will test an innovative mobile health adaptation of a behavioral intervention that improves sleep and mental health concerns among adolescents.

    at UCSF

  • Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) Therapy in Major Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a low-intensity neuromodulation technique of minimal risk that has been used as an experimental procedure for reducing depressive symptoms and symptoms of other brain disorders. Though tDCS applied to prefrontal brain areas is shown to reduce symptoms in some people with major depressive disorder (MDD), the extent of antidepressant response often differs. Methods that map current flow directly in the brain while a person is receiving tDCS and that determine how functional neuroimaging signal changes after a series of tDCS sessions may help us understand how tDCS works, how it can be optimized, and if it can be used as an effective antidepressant. Investigators will address these questions in a two-part randomized double blind exploratory clinical trial. For this part of the study, investigators will determine relationships between target engagement and clinical outcomes (mood) and functional sub-constructs of cognitive control and emotion negativity bias, and whether imaging markers at baseline predict changes in antidepressant response. One hundred people with depression (50 in each group) will be randomized to receive either HD-tDCS or sham-tDCS for a total of 12 sessions each lasting 20 minutes occurring on consecutive weekdays. At the first and last session, subjects will receive 20-30 minutes of active or sham HD-tDCS in the MRI scanner, which will allow investigators to map tDCS currents, and track changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) pre-to- post treatment using completely non-invasive methods. At the first and last session and mid-way through the trial, participants will also complete a series of clinical ratings and neurocognitive tests.

    at UCLA

  • Using Electrophysiology to Index Non-invasive Brain Stimulation Effects on Reward System Functioning in Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Depression is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, conferring substantial healthcare and societal costs. By studying methods to non-invasively target neural circuitry involved in reward responsivity, information generated by this project will improve understanding of the circuit alterations that underlie motivation and pleasure deficits in depression, and could also lead to the development of biologically-based markers of neurostimulation-based treatment response.

    at UCSF

  • Virtual Reality-Reward Training for Anhedonia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of Virtual Reality-Reward Training (VR-RT) with an active control condition, Virtual Reality-Memory Training (VR-MT), on positive affect and other clinical symptoms. VR-Reward Training is a novel intervention aimed at enhancing savoring of positive experiences among individuals with depression and low positive affect through guided imaginal recounting following immersion in positive VR experiences. Target enrollment is 80 male and female participants with low positive affect, depression, and impaired functioning, who are at least 18 years old, who will be randomly assigned to 7 weeks of either Virtual Reality-Reward Training (VR-RT) or Virtual Reality-Memory Training (VR-MT). Participants will complete in-person VR sessions, laboratory assessments, self-report questionnaires as part of the study. The total length of participation is around 3 months.

    at UCLA

  • A Standard of Care Study of Patients With Major Depressive Disorder Who Have Had an Inadequate Response to a Selective Serotonin Reuptake/Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor Antidepressant

    open to eligible people ages 18-74

    The purpose of this study is to assess the safety (adverse events, serious adverse events, deaths, suicidality) of participants with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated according to the standard of care (SOC).

    at UCSF

  • Health and Health Care Utilization Effects of Medical Debt Forgiveness

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this study is to estimate the direct, causal impact of medical debt on health care utilization, mental health, and wellbeing of patients. The investigators will conduct a survey to measure the impact of the debt forgiveness on health care use, mental health, and wellbeing. The survey will be administered to approximately 17,000 subjects of a recent medical financial intervention. In that prior intervention, a non-profit charity, RIP Medical Debt, purchased and abolished medical debt for a randomly selected about 6,000 (out of the 17,000) individuals. In this current protocol, the investigators will administer the survey, and will compare surveyed outcomes of subjects who received and did not receive the intervention.

    at UCLA

  • SKY Breath Intervention

    open to eligible people ages 16-24

    Depression is highly debilitating and prevalent among adolescents. Adolescent-onset depression is associated with long, severe, and recurrent episodes that are often not responsive to treatment. There is a dire need to develop novel treatments that are efficient, cost-effective, and tolerant for this population. Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY) is a breath-based meditative practice that entails a sequence of specific breathing techniques to help practitioners achieve a state of calm alertness. It has offered benefits as a therapeutic option for mild-to-moderate depression and anxiety disorders and as an adjunctive treatment in patients with major depressive disorder, but the neurological mechanism of SKY breath intervention is still not fully understood. The goal of this study is to determine the efficacy of SKY breath intervention in treating depressed adolescents and to understand its mechanisms. In this study, thirty depressed adolescents and thirty healthy controls will be recruited to evaluate the efficacy of the 8-week SKY intervention. Assessment for depression and anxiety, salivary cortisol, resting heart rate, blood pressure, and neuroimaging will be collected at the baseline, 4 weeks into SKY intervention (questionnaires only), and post-intervention. This will be the first study to evaluate the potential benefits of of SKY breath intervention as a treatment option for depressed adolescents.

    at UCSF

  • A Study of Aticaprant 10 Milligrams (mg) as Adjunctive Therapy in Adult Participants With MDD With Moderate-to-severe Anhedonia and Inadequate Response to Current Antidepressant Therapy

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of aticaprant compared with placebo as adjunctive therapy to an antidepressant in improving depressive symptoms in adult participants with major depressive disorder (MDD) with moderate to severe anhedonia (ANH+) who have had an inadequate response to current antidepressant therapy with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI).

    at UCSD

  • A Study of Aticaprant as Adjunctive Therapy in Adult Participants With Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) With Moderate-to-severe Anhedonia and Inadequate Response to Current Antidepressant Therapy

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of aticaprant compared with placebo as adjunctive therapy to an antidepressant in improving depressive symptoms in adult participants with major depressive disorder (MDD) with moderate-to-severe anhedonia (ANH+) who have had an inadequate response to current antidepressant therapy with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI).

    at UCSF

  • A Study of Aticaprant in Adult and Elderly Participants With Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to assess the long-term safety and tolerability of aticaprant administered as adjunctive therapy to a current antidepressant (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor [SSRI] or serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor [SNRI]) in all participants with major depressive disorder (MDD).

    at UCSD UCSF

  • A Study of Psilocybin for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    One hundred participants, ages 21 to 65, who meet Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD) will be stratified by study site and randomized with a 1-to-1 allocation under double-blind conditions to receive a single 25 mg oral dose of psilocybin or a single 100 mg oral dose of niacin. Niacin will serve as an active placebo. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential efficacy of a single 25 mg oral dose of psilocybin for MDD compared to the active placebo in otherwise medically-healthy participants, assessed as the difference between groups in changes in depressive symptoms from Baseline to Day 43 post-dose.

    at UCSF

  • A Study of Seltorexant as Adjunctive Therapy to Antidepressants in Adolescents With Major Depressive Disorder Who Have an Inadequate Response to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) and Psychotherapy

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to assess the safety and tolerability of Seltorexant as adjunctive therapy to an antidepressant in adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) in the short-term compared with placebo.

    at UCSD

  • Amplification of Positivity for Alcohol Use Disorder Co-Occurring With Anxiety or Depression

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of a protocol in which individuals with comorbid depression or anxiety disorders and alcohol use disorder will be randomized to complete Amplification of Positivity for Alcohol Use Disorder (AMP-A)- a psychological treatment focused on increasing positive thoughts, emotions, and behaviors- or a traditional cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention. Assessed outcomes will include participant acceptability and completion rates, participant compliance with the intervention, positive and negative affect, substance use- and depression and anxiety-related symptom severity, and functional disability.

    at UCSD

  • App-Based Mindfulness Meditation for People of Color Who Experience Race-Related Stress

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In the United States, people of color (POC) are disproportionally affected by stressors related to race/ethnicity compared with their non-Latinx White (NLW). Considering POC exposed to race-related stress are at high risk of developing a mental health disorder, there is a clear need for treatments that allow individuals to cope effectively with these stressors. Among many evidence-based treatments available, mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) may be particularly well suited to help POC cope. MBIs are hypothesized to be effective via increases in mindfulness and self-compassion, as well as reductions in experiential avoidance, rumination, and emotion suppression. Despite their effectiveness, MBIs rarely reach POC. As such, innovative strategies such as self-directed app-based intervention may reduce the treatment gap. Considering the lack of research examining the effectiveness of MBIs among POC, especially those who experience elevated levels of race-related stress, this study will employ a randomized control trial (RCT) approach to examine whether receiving an app-based MBI engages the hypothesized mechanisms of change (i.e., mindfulness, self-compassion, experiential avoidance, rumination, emotion suppression) among POC. Similarly, the study will test whether the intervention leads to decreases in the negative mental health outcomes more often associated with exposure to race-related stress (i.e., stress, anxiety, depression). Acceptability, adherence, and satisfaction also will be analyzed to explore whether a non-culturally adapted MBI is still relevant for POC who face race-related stress. Results from this trial will contribute to the nascent data on MBI acceptability and effectiveness with POC. To the investigators' knowledge, this study will also be the first to include a sample of POC recruited based on elevated levels of race-related stress, a high-risk population that is not commonly targeted in MBI research.

    at UCLA

  • Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up for Depression

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The overarching goal is to pilot the Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC) intervention for mothers with heightened depressive symptom and their children with heightened internalizing symptoms.

    at UCSF

  • BEhavioral Health Stratified Treatment (BEST) Study for Youth With Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities (IDD)

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Many youth with disabilities and their families receive "care coordination services" from a state Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) agency. MCHB care coordination services help youth with disabilities get the medical care and social services they need to be healthy. Complex HEalth Care for Kids (CHECK) developed a program to combine mental health treatment and care coordination services for youth with disabilities. The goal of this study is to see whether a care coordination program that treats depression and anxiety (MCHB care coordination + CHECK) is better than a care coordination program (MCHB care coordination alone) that refers youth to mental health services in terms of making youth feel healthier, happier, and able to handle future challenges. The project team will test which care coordination approach is better at making youth with disabilities: (Aim 1) less anxious and depressed; (Aim 2) feel healthier, function better, and practice healthy habits; (Aim 3) improve their ability to manage their health. This study will also evaluate which approach makes (Aim 4) youth, caregivers, and providers feel more satisfied with their care coordination experience. This study will give youth with disabilities and their families information about what kinds of care coordination models are available, and better suited to their needs. The study team will reach out to 780 youth with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, age 13-20 years old, who receive care coordination services from the state of Illinois MCHB. If these youth are eligible and agree to be in the study, they will be placed, by chance, into either MCHB care coordination alone or into the MCHB care coordination + CHECK program. In both groups, youth will have a care coordinator who helps them identify and make plans to meet their needs and provides referrals to services/resources. Youth in the MCHB care coordination + CHECK care coordination will get mental health treatment directly from CHECK staff if they report symptoms of depression or anxiety. Treatment may include an online program or group meetings that teach youth how to cope with negative thoughts and feelings. Youth in each group will be followed for 24 months and will receive gift cards for participating. Youth will be asked questions about anxiety and depression, health, functioning, ability to manage their health care, self-efficacy, and their experience with care coordination.

    at UCLA

  • Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management Device for the Treatment of Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Stage I-III Breast or Lung Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies the effect of a digital application (app), BNT001, on cognitive-behavioral stress management in patients with stage I-III breast or lung cancer. The app is designed for cancer patients to treat anxiety and depressive symptoms related to their cancer diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to develop and refine procedures for eligibility screening, suicide risk assessment, and delivery of the app prior to the launch of a phase III randomized trial. The impact of the app in managing stress and improving quality of life and mood is a secondary aim.

    at UCLA

  • Competitive Revision for CLARO: Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery From Other Stresses

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to develop and then test an enhanced version of the parent study's collaborative care intervention for co-occurring disorders (CC-COD) to reduce the risk of suicide and overdose among individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) in combination with PTSD/depression. The parent study is CLARO, Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery from Other Stresses (NCT04559893).

    at UCLA

  • Compressed Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In this proposal the investigators will use an accelerated TMS protocol that concentrates the magnetic stimulation that would usually occur over 6 weeks into 10 treatment sessions per days, for 5 consecutive days in patient with treatment-refractory depression. This protocol will build on a previously published study demonstrating clinical efficacy of intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) on left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-dlPFC) in a treatment refractory population.

    at UCSD

  • Computational Cognitive Training To Boost Reward Responsiveness In Anhedonic Patients

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Anhedonia, i.e., reduced positive mood and decreased sensitivity to rewards, is observed in many psychiatric illnesses, particularly depression and anxiety disorders. Untreated anhedonia predicts worse clinical outcomes and poorer response to treatment, yet cognitive behavioral treatment approaches to target anhedonia are fraught with poor patient compliance in real-life settings. The proposed study aims to address this gap by 1) testing the usefulness of a non-invasive, computationally informed, cognitive training in boosting reward sensitivity and reducing anhedonia in depressed and anxious patients, and 2) delineating the neurocomputational mechanisms of change associated with such intervention. In other words, can we train the brain to obtain rewards and boost positive mood among depressed and anxious individuals? This project will help to develop a computational training protocol aimed at reducing anhedonia and improving existing interventions for psychiatric conditions characterized by reward processing deficits. Long-term goals include expanding this framework to a broader range of appetitive and social stimuli to develop precise cognitive training tools to treat anhedonia.

    at UCSD

  • Confirmatory Efficacy and Safety Trial of Magnetic Seizure Therapy for Depression

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This trial aims to assess the efficacy and tolerability of Magnetic Seizure Therapy (MST) as an alternative to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for depression. Even with multiple medication trials, 30 - 40% of patients will experience a pharmacologically resistant form of illness. The ineffectiveness of current treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) coupled with the economic burden associated with the disorder engenders a need for novel therapeutic interventions that can provide greater response and remission rates.

    at UCSD

  • Diabetes and Depression Text Messaging Intervention

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The main aim of the "Diabetes and Mental Health Adaptive Notification Tracking and Evaluation" trial (DIAMANTE) is to test a smartphone intervention that generates adaptive messaging, learning from daily patient data to personalize the timing and type of text-messages. We will compare the adaptive content to 1. a static messaging intervention with health management and educational messages and 2. a control condition that receives a weekly mood message. The primary outcomes for this aim will be improvements in physical activity at 6-month follow-up defined by daily step counts.

    at UCSF

  • Effects of Intravenous (IV) Citalopram Hydrochloride During Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will recruit 30 subjects diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Subjects will be recieve one infusion treatment of citalopram or placebo and 10 treatments of a form of transcranial magnetic stimulation, theta burst stimulation (TBS). Subjects will also undergo brain scans, quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) brain activity recordings, and mood surveys. Study activities will be performed over the course of 4 weeks.

    at UCLA

  • Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation for MDD

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will evaluate the effectiveness of intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation for patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    at UCLA

  • Mindfulness-based Intervention to Address PTSD in Trauma-exposed, Homeless Women

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a major public health concern that disproportionately effects minorities and those with low-socioeconomic status, such as homeless women, creating a critical health disparity. PTSD has been linked with dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) functioning and increased inflammation, which can lead to long-term physical-health problems and PTSD-symptom maintenance, exacerbating disparities. Mindfulness-based interventions, including Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction (MBSR), have shown promise as a complementary tool for addressing PTSD in veterans and with low-income, minority populations, but homeless women have not been examined adequately. MBSR may improve PTSD symptomatology and help modulate the dysregulated stress response common in individuals with PTSD, improving physical and mental health concurrently. This project is an open-label, parallel, modified-cross over clinical trial of a modified-MBSR intervention to reduce PTSD symptoms in homeless women and to explore physiological correlates of treatment-response. Hypotheses: 1. Participation in an MBSR-based intervention will be associated with clinically significant reduction in PTSD (primary outcome), lower depression symptoms and greater drug and alcohol abstinence (secondary outcomes) compared to participation in an attention control. 2. Compared to an attention control, participants in an MBSR-based intervention group will demonstrate improvements in cortisol reactivity and lower inflammation. At baseline, women will complete psychosocial assessments (e.g., depression, substance use, trauma history) and participate in a brief stress task, providing salivary samples before and after the task (which will be assayed for cortisol and C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation). Women will then participate in 1) a 9-session MBSR-based program that was modified based on an initial qualitative component that involved a Community Advisory Board and focus groups with women from the community (N=4 focus groups; 28 women total) or 2) a nine-session health-promotion course (i.e., attention-control condition). Follow-up assessments that include psychosocial and biological data will occur immediately after final intervention session and again 6-months later. Clinically-meaningful improvements in PTSD (primary outcome) and secondary outcomes (e.g., depression, substance use, inflammation, cortisol reactivity) will be examined.

    at UCLA

  • Mobile Virtual Positive Experiences for Anhedonia

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Anhedonia is a symptom dimension that characterizes many individuals suffering from depression, as well as some types of anxiety, psychosis, and substance use. For the most part, treatments are effective in decreasing negative affect but ineffective in improving anhedonia, with some antidepressant medications even worsening symptoms of anhedonia. Yet anhedonia is a significant marker of poor prognosis as well as suicidal ideation and actual suicide. The development of effective treatments for anhedonia is thus of paramount importance. Advances in neuroscience indicate specific targets that may underlie anhedonia that can be shifted through behavioral training. The investigators have developed such a program and found it to be effective in raising positive affect, especially for depressed or anxious individuals with anhedonia at baseline. To date, this program has been implemented by highly trained clinicians, which have supervised its implementation on a large scale. Moreover, the behavior program is dependent on readily available rewarding experiences, which anhedonia obviously challenges. Furthermore, mechanistic evaluation is impeded by intra¬- and inter-¬individual variability in exposure to rewarding stimuli. Virtual Reality (VR) offsets these barriers by repeated controlled immersion in experiences designed to enhance approach motivation, initial responsiveness to reward attainment, and reward learning. In this current study, the investigators aim to measure clinical outcomes using Virtual Reality-Reward Training (VR-RT).

    at UCLA

  • Neural Mechanisms of Meditation Training in Healthy and Depressed Adolescents: An MRI Connectome Study PART 2

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The primary objective will be to study changes in putamen connectivity and depression severity in depressed teens with meditation training. H1: Putamen node strength will increase in the training group compared to the active controls. H2: This increase in node strength will correlate with practice amount recorded by participants. H3: There will be a significant reduction in self-rated depression symptoms following the training as measured by the Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale (RADS-2), compared to controls. H4: This reduction will correlate with the increase in putamen node strength. Design and Outcomes: The current research study design will utilize an individually randomized group treatment, open-label, active-controlled clinical trial to test the efficacy and safety of the investigator's innovative mindfulness meditation intervention (Training for Awareness Resilience and Action [TARA]) on the primary outcome (Putamen structural node strength) and secondary outcome (depression symptoms measured using Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale [RADS-2]) in depressed adolescents between the ages of 14 to 18 years old.

    at UCSF

  • Pain and Major Depressive Disorder

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study will examine the effects of brain stimulation on pain symptoms associated with Major depressive disorder. This study will enroll 69 Subjects. Study subjects will be asked to complete surveys about their mood and well-being, 2 blood draws, 2 MRIs, 3 electroencephalograms, and receive 30 treatments of blinded transcranial magnetic stimulation. There is no control group as all subjects will receive some form of active treatment. Subjects are required to participate in 30-33 study visits and volunteer 40 hours of their time. Compensation for this study is $150 for completing all study activities.

    at UCLA

  • Psilocybin-assisted CBT for Depression

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The primary objectives of this clinical investigation are to (1) determine the feasibility of joining psilocybin treatment with CBT (cognitive-behavioral therapy) for patients with depression, (2) optimize CBT to most effectively integrate the psilocybin experience with psychotherapy and (3) determine the initial efficacy of psilocybin as an adjunct to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for major depressive disorder. Psilocybin will be administered orally in two doses during the course of 12 sessions of CBT to eligible study participants - a 10mg dose following the third session and a 25mg dose following the sixth session. Participants will be in active treatment for the first 4 months (psilocybin + CBT) of the study and then followed for an additional 3-months following the termination of CBT.

    at UCLA

  • Psychostimulant Augmentation of Repetitive TMS for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This study analyzes the affects or Adderall extended-release (XR) in Subjects receiving brain stimulation therapy for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder. Subjects will be assigned by chance to active or placebo group. Active group will be asked to take one 15 mg pill once daily of Adderall XR (amphetamine) and the Placebo group will be asked take an identical appearing tablet/capsule, one tablet by mouth daily. The placebo tablet has no active ingredients and has no affect on the body or mind. With the exception of the study drug, all other study activities between both groups will be identical. Subjects will use the assigned study drug two weeks before therapy and throughout the first 10 therapy treatments. A total of seven(7) visits will be required for screening, drug assignment, and completion of mood assessments. This study will enroll a total of 30 Subjects.

    at UCLA

  • Pupillary Unrest as an Indicator of Central Opioid Effect in Subjects 40-60 Years of Age

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study will establish the relationship between magnitude of opioid exposure and a pupillary measure referred to as PUAL (pupillary unrest in ambient light), in subjects aged 40-60. Previous investigation demonstrated that loss of PUAL was a sensitive, discriminative indicator of opioid toxicity and respiratory depression among subjects aged 20-40 years old. Population data indicate that pupil size and PUAL decline slightly with age. The investigators will explore whether PUAL proves to be a sensitive indicator of opioid exposure and respiratory depression in this older group.

    at UCSF

  • RCT of Brain Longitudinal Biomarker Study (OPT-Neuro RCT)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to assess which antidepressants work the best in older adults who have treatment-resistant depression (TRD), and to test whether treatment-resistant late life depression is associated with declines in memory and attention and brain structure and function.

    at UCLA

  • Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Veterans with comorbid chronic pain and depression are highly prevalent, have poor functional status and low quality of life, are at increased risk of suicide and lack access to effective treatments. To address this problem, the proposed research will examine the feasibility of a novel approach that integrates repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with the overall goal of maximizing functional improvement in Veterans with chronic pain and depression. This is an important first-step in preparation for a future randomized efficacy trial. The investigators will also include two cognitive control tasks with concurrent electroencephalography to explore as a potential objective indicator of treatment response. This application addresses a critical need within the Veterans Health Administration and is closely aligned with the focus area of developing suicide prevention treatments that influence participation in life roles.

    at UCSD

  • Resources, Inspiration, Support and Empowerment (RISE) for Black Pregnant Women

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders (PMADs) encompass a range of mental health disorders that occur during pregnancy and up to one year postpartum. Approximately 13% of women experience PMADs. This rate doubles for those with adverse perinatal outcomes (APO) and triples in Black women. Recent research points to racism as one significant source of these health disparities. Cultural adaptations to improve communication with providers decrease rates of depression in minority patients as well as improve adherence to treatment, insight and alliance. Discrimination stress and worries about experiencing medical consequences are thought to increase systemic inflammation, a mechanism known to drive mental and physical symptoms. Inflammation has been implicated in both PMADs and APO, suggesting a shared underlying etiology. Evidence from our work suggests that inflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of PMADs. The proposed pilot randomized control trial will allow the investigators to build on promising preliminary results and identify whether our culturally relevant mobile Health (mHealth) intervention is effective in improving outcomes among Black pregnant women randomized to the intervention compared to a control group. The culturally relevant modules include building communication and self-advocacy skills and provide a support network. The primary objective of this research is to provide guidance for clinical care of Black women during the perinatal period, with the goal to improve mental health and physical health outcomes. A secondary goal is to examine novel inflammatory signatures that change as a function of the intervention to reduce PMADs in this population. As inflammation may be diagnostic of PMADs, identification of its role may shed light of potential intervention targets and provide critical knowledge to improve women's long-term health. PMAD symptoms will be assessed prospectively in 150 Black pregnant women, half of whom will be randomized to receive the culturally relevant mHealth intervention. The investigators hypothesize that women in the intervention group will have reduced rates of PMADs and APOs, an increase in adherence to mental health treatment and will report increased self-advocacy skills, increased communication with providers, and reduced levels of discrimination related stress. Participants will also have improved biological risk indicators including lower circulating C-reactive protein and a transcription profile of differentially expressed inflammatory genes, marked by a decreased activity of inflammatory transcription factors from blood spots. Given the high burden of both PMADs and APOs among Black mothers and the numerous consequences on maternal and child outcomes, it is imperative that investigators develop and implement effective interventions, and test the biological mechanisms that might drive these effects. This work is interdisciplinary, building on a network of community advocates to implement a novel mHealth intervention informed by real world experiences designed to enhance self-advocacy, reduce stress and prevent adverse outcomes

    at UCLA

  • Sleep and Healthy Aging Research on Depression for Younger Women

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Compelling evidence indicates inflammation plays a role in depression, but potential mechanisms linking inflammation to depression, such as dysregulated reward processing, are poorly understood. This study comprehensively evaluates effects of inflammation on reward across dimensions (e.g., anticipating versus receiving a reward) and types (e.g., money vs. smiling faces) in younger and older women. Characterizing how inflammation shapes the dynamic and multidimensional reward system, and how this may differ by age, may give insight into risk factors for depression and help identify critical points for intervention.

    at UCLA

  • Spatiotemporal Dynamics of the Human Emotion Network

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The overall goal of this study is to elucidate how emotion network dynamics relate to the behavioral, autonomic, and experiential changes that accompany emotions and to investigate how emotion network dysfunction relates to affective symptoms. Affective symptoms are a common feature of neuropsychiatric disorders that reflect dysfunction in a distributed brain network that supports emotion. How aberrant functioning in a single emotion network underlies a wide range of affective symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, is not well understood. Anchored by the anterior cingulate cortex and ventral anterior insula, the emotion network responds to numerous affective stimuli. The recording of neural activity directly from the cortical surface from individuals is a promising approach since intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) can provide direct estimates of neuronal populations to map the spatiotemporal dynamics of the emotion network at a millisecond level resolution. This study will exam how activity within emotion network hubs changes during emotions and how emotion network properties make some individuals more vulnerable to affective symptoms than others. A multidisciplinary approach is critical for understanding the dynamic brain network to advance neuroanatomical models of emotions and for guiding the development of novel treatments for affective symptoms.

    at UCSF

  • Spectral Correlation Coefficient-based TMS

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This study will analyze the feasibility, safety, and tolerability of administering repetitive Transcranial magnetic stimulation(TMS) at frequencies other than standard 10 Hz. This study will enroll 10 subjects who will undergo one quantitative electroencephalograph, one TMS procedure to determine the appropriate frequency and intensity for treatment, weekly mood/symptom assessments, and up to 30 TMS treatments. Subjects will be asked to participate for up to 6 weeks.

    at UCLA

  • Spectral Correlation Coefficient-determine TMS for Depression

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will investigate the feasibility, safety, and tolerability of administering repetitive Transcranial magnetic stimulation(TMS) at frequencies other than standard 10 Hz. This study will enroll 10 subjects who will undergo one quantitative electroencephalograph, one TMS procedure to determine the appropriate frequency and intensity for treatment, weekly mood/symptom assessments, and up to 30 TMS treatments. Subjects will be asked to participate for up to 6 weeks.

    at UCLA

  • Technology Enhanced Family Treatment

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators propose to enhance the scalability of family-focused therapy (FFT), a 12-session evidence-based therapy for youth at high risk for mood disorders, through augmentation with a novel mobile phone application called MyCoachConnect (MCC). In adolescents with mood instability who have a parent with bipolar or major depressive disorder, clinicians in community clinics will conduct FFT sessions (consisting of psychoeducation and family skills training) supplemented by weekly MCC "real time" assessments of moods and family relationships; based on results of these assessments and the family's progress in treatment, clinicians will then push personalized informational and coaching alerts regarding the practice of communication and problem-solving skills. The investigators hypothesize that the augmented version of FFT (FFT-MCC) will be more effective than FFT without coaching/informational alerts in altering treatment targets and in stabilizing youths' mood symptoms and quality of life.

    at UCLA

  • Women's Health Initiative Strong and Healthy Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The WHISH trial applies state-of-the science behavioral principles and currently available technologies to deliver a physical activity intervention without face-to-face contact to ~25,000 older U.S. women expected to consent. It includes the National Institute of Aging (NIA) Go4Life® Exercise & Physical Activity materials 3 and WHISH developed targeted materials based on Go4Life® to provide inspirational tips and recommendations about how to achieve nationally recommended levels of PA and overcome barriers to exercise, with a means for self-monitoring and setting personal goals. The intervention builds upon evidence-based behavioral science principles and intervention components that have proven to be effective in increasing PA in older women, with innovative adaptive approaches to tailoring the delivery to meet individual (personal) needs.

    at UCSD

  • Characterizing Cognitive Decline in Late Life Depression: The ADNI Depression Project

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this research study is to characterize the mechanisms contributing to cognitive impairment and accelerated cognitive decline in Late Life Depression (LLD). This is a non-randomized, observational, non-treatment study. One hundred and twenty (120) subjects who meet criteria for Major Depression or LLD will be enrolled for a period of 30 months. Data from an additional 300 non-depressed subjects will be used from ADNI studies for comparison. Depression history, symptom severity and health information will be collected at the initial psychiatric visit to determine eligibility. A 3 Tesla (3T) Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan and florbetapir (18F-AV-45) amyloid imaging will be conducted at the ADNI clinic site visits. Collection of plasma and serum for biomarkers, clinical assessments and cognitive assessments will be conducted at two time points. Blood samples will also be collected for genetic analysis.

    at UCSF

  • Computerized Substance Use and Depression Screening and Behavioral Treatment in HIV Primary Care

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Substance use disorders (SUDs), depression and anxiety in HIV-infected patients result in poor HIV outcomes, yet are often unrecognized and untreated. To address these problems, this study examines the implementation and effectiveness of a clinical intervention consisting of self-administered tablet-based SUD and depression screening at routine HIV primary care clinic visits, followed by evidence-based treatments for SUD, anxiety and depression delivered by a behavioral health specialist. If successful, this study has potential to reduce SUD-, anxiety- and depression-related problems and reduce HIV treatment disparities for patients with these comorbidities.

    at UCSF

  • Inflammatory and Glutamatergic Mechanisms of Sustained Threat in Adolescents With Depression

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Despite the prevalence and significant public health concern over depression among adolescents, up to 40% of depressed adolescents do not respond to first-line antidepressants (herein termed treatment non-response, TNR). The goal of this project is to recruit and assess 160 treatment-seeking depressed adolescents and test whether acute stress impacts peripheral levels of inflammation and downstream levels of glutamate in corticolimbic regions previously associated with depression, whether these stress-related biomarkers predict TNR to a 12-week trial of either fluoxetine or escitalopram, and whether these stress-related biomarkers predict 18-month clinical course.

    at UC Irvine UCLA UCSF

  • Latent Structure of Multi-level Assessments and Predictors of Outcomes for Women in Recovery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In this study the investigators will seek to improve their understanding of how positive and negative valence systems, cognition, and arousal/interoception are inter-related in disorders of trauma, mood, substance use, and eating behavior for women involved in a court diversion program in Tulsa, Oklahoma (Women in Recovery). The investigators will recruit 100 individuals and use a wide range of assessment tools, neuroimaging measures, blood and microbiome collections and behavioral tasks to complete the baseline and follow-up study visits. Upon completion, the investigators aim to have robust and reliable dimensional measures that quantify these systems and a set of assessments that should be recommended as a clinical tool to enhance outcome prediction for the clinician and assist in determining who will likely benefit from the diversion program, and to inform future revision or augmentation of the program to increase treatment effectiveness.

    at UCSD

  • Longitudinal Observational Biomarker Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to test whether treatment-resistant late life depression is associated with declines in memory and attention and brain structure and function.

    at UCLA

Our lead scientists for Depression research studies include .