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Depression clinical trials at University of California Health

67 in progress, 37 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Neuroimaging Study of Open-label Placebo in Depressed Adolescents

    open to eligible people ages 13-18

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the current leading cause of disability worldwide and adolescence is an especially vulnerable period for the onset of depression. Non-pharmacologic approaches are particularly attractive as treatment of adolescent depression due to the elevated risks of side effects related to the use of psychotropic drugs during development. A recent meta-analysis detected a positive and significant effect of non-deceptive placebos (open-label placebo, OLP) for a series of clinical conditions, including adult depression. To the investigators' knowledge, no studies of OLP have been conducted in depressed adolescents to date, although placebo response rates in adolescent depression are especially high, accounting for over 80% of the actual response to antidepressant treatment. The study's main objective is to estimate the effectiveness and understand the mechanism of OLP in depressed adolescents. The central hypothesis is that the mechanism by which OLP exerts its action in adolescent depression is by forming a positive expectation, which activates endogenous mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-mediated neurotransmission in a network of regions implicated in emotion, stress regulation, and the pathophysiology of MDD, namely, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) - striato - amygdalo - thalamic network. The hypothesis has been formulated on the basis of published research and preliminary data. The investigators will test the hypothesis by performing structural and functional neuroimaging in 60 untreated 13-18 year-old adolescents with mild to moderate depression. The proposed research is significant, because it is expected to elucidate the mechanism of action of OLP and advance the understanding of the neural underpinnings of positive expectations in adolescent depression.

    at UCSF

  • A Prospective, Multi-center, Randomized Controlled Blinded Trial Demonstrating the Safety and Effectiveness of VNS Therapy® System as Adjunctive Therapy Versus a No Stimulation Control in Subjects With Treatment-Resistant Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Objectives of this study are to determine whether active VNS Therapy treatment is superior to a no stimulation control in producing a reduction in baseline depressive symptom severity, based on multiple depression scale assessment tools at 12 months from randomization.

    at UCSD

  • A Study of Psilocybin for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

    open to eligible people ages 21-65

    Eighty participants, ages 21 to 65, who meet Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD) will be stratified by study site and randomized with a 1-to-1 allocation under double-blind conditions to receive a single 25 mg oral dose of psilocybin or a single 100 mg oral dose of niacin. Niacin will serve as an active placebo. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential efficacy of a single 25 mg oral dose of psilocybin for MDD compared to the active placebo in otherwise medically-healthy participants, assessed as the difference between groups in changes in depressive symptoms from Baseline to Day 8 post-dose.

    at UCSF

  • Amplification of Positivity for Alcohol Use Disorder Co-Occurring With Anxiety or Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-55

    The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of a protocol in which individuals with comorbid depression or anxiety disorders and alcohol use disorder will be randomized to complete Amplification of Positivity for Alcohol Use Disorder (AMP-A)- a psychological treatment focused on increasing positive thoughts, emotions, and behaviors- or a traditional cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention. Assessed outcomes will include participant acceptability and completion rates, participant compliance with the intervention, positive and negative affect, substance use- and depression and anxiety-related symptom severity, and functional disability.

    at UCSD

  • Amplification of Positivity to Enhance Social Connections in Anxiety and Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-55

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a novel transdiagnostic behavioral treatment -- Amplification of Positivity (AMP) -- intended to enhance positive social connections in individuals with elevated anxiety and/or depression. Social relationship impairments are common and debilitating consequences of anxiety and depression. Existing treatments have some beneficial impact on social functioning; however, many people continue to have few and/or poor quality relationships following treatment, even after experiencing symptom relief. This study will evaluate the effects of AMP on the brain systems that have been shown to be important for establishing positive connections with others. Approximately 100 individuals (ages 18-55) seeking treatment for anxiety or depression will participate in this study. Participants will be randomly assigned with equal probability to either AMP or stress management training (SMT) (6 sessions each). Participants will be assessed at baseline and post-treatment and compared on measures assessing brain responses to social reward (primary outcome), as well as physiological, behavioral, and emotional responses to social reward (secondary outcomes). It is hypothesized that the AMP group will experience greater increases from pre- to post-treatment in activity in brain systems that regulate the processing of social reward cues (e.g., striatum) relative to participants in the SMT group. It is also hypothesized that changes in brain activation to social reward from pre- to post-treatment will be correlated with the degree of improvement in social connectedness.

    at UCSD

  • An Adaptive Intervention for Depression Among Latinos Living With HIV.

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will use a pilot sequential multiple assignment randomized trial (SMART) design to build an adaptive treatment strategy (ATS) for depression and engagement in HIV among Latinos living with HIV. The ATS is the sequencing of treatments, which are a behavioral activation therapy (BAT), a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and mobile health (mHealth) tool. The outcomes are to assess the feasibility of the SMART and ATS in the HIV care site and acceptability of the SMART and ATS to patients and clinic staff.

    at UCSF

  • Aripiprazole Lauroxil for Preventing Psychotic Relapse After an Initial Schizophrenia Episode

    open to eligible people ages 18-45

    This 12-month study will evaluate the efficacy of aripiprazole lauroxil compared to oral aripiprazole in preventing the re-emergence of psychotic symptoms in patients with a recent onset of schizophrenia.

    at UCLA

  • Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up for Depression

    open to eligible females ages 18-50

    The overarching goal is to pilot the Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC) intervention for mothers with heightened depressive symptom and their children with heightened internalizing symptoms.

    at UCSF

  • Azithromycin for Meibomian Gland Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study aims to elucidate the effectiveness of oral azithromycin in treating symptomatic dry eye syndrome secondary to Meibomian gland dysfunction.

    at UCSF

  • Biomarkers of Depression and Treatment Response

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    This study is a stratified, parallel-group, single-center study utilizing multimodal imaging techniques to identify biomarkers for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The study goal is to identify biomarkers for MDD and treatment response that can be implemented in clinical diagnosis and care as valid and reliable measures, through monitoring neurophysiological and electrophysiological changes across the course of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) treatment.

    at UCSF

  • Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Major Depression

    open to eligible people ages 22-70

    Neurons are specialized types of cells that are responsible for carrying out the functions of the brain. Neurons communicate with electrical signals. In diseases such as major depression this electrical communication can go awry. One way to change brain function is using electrical stimulation to help alter the communication between groups of neurons in the brain. The purpose of this study is to test a personalized approach to brain stimulation as an intervention for depression. The study researchers will use a surgically implanted device to measure each individual's brain activity related to his/her depression. The researchers will then use small electrical impulses to alter that brain activity and measure whether these changes help reduce depression symptoms. This study is intended for patients with major depression whose symptoms have not been adequately treated with currently available therapies. The device used in this study is called the NeuroPace Responsive Neurostimulation (RNS) System. It is currently FDA approved to treat patients with epilepsy. The study will test whether personalized responsive neurostimulation can safely and effectively treat depression.

    at UCSF

  • Cognitive Training Delivered Remotely to Individuals With Psychosis (ROAM)

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    Primary study: This study is a single-site, double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial to compare an evidence-based structured program of 30-35 hours of on-line cognitive and social cognitive training exercises performed over 16 weeks (~2 hours per week), delivered with an innovative digital app which provides users with a motivation coach to set personalized goals and with secure social networking for peer support, "PRIME" ; vs. 2) A control condition of computer games, encouraged at ~2 hours per week over 16 weeks, delivered with "PRIME". Unblinded Cognitive Training Sub-Study: Participants who were randomized to the computer games arm of the trial may be offered access to the active cognitive training at the end of their 6 month follow up appointments, if they still meet inclusion criteria. PRIME Super Users Sub-Study: Participants who have provided all follow up data to the initial study, including those who are currently enrolled in the Unblinded Cognitive Training sub-study, may be offered continued participation in the PRIME community as super-users.

    at UCSF

  • Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management Device for the Treatment of Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Stage I-III Breast or Lung Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the effect of a digital application (app), BNT001, on cognitive-behavioral stress management in patients with stage I-III breast or lung cancer. The app is designed for cancer patients to treat anxiety and depressive symptoms related to their cancer diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to develop and refine procedures for eligibility screening, suicide risk assessment, and delivery of the app prior to the launch of a phase III randomized trial. The impact of the app in managing stress and improving quality of life and mood is a secondary aim.

    at UCLA

  • Comparative Effectiveness Research Trial for Antidepressant Incomplete and Non-responders With TRD

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    This is a multi-site, randomized, open-label, effectiveness trial comparing three treatment arms for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) patients with TRD who are currently on ongoing, stable and adequate antidepressant therapy (ADT). Adequate ADT is defined as a therapeutically sufficient dose for a sufficient treatment period, which would be expected to be effective as listed in the MGH Antidepressant Treatment Response Questionnaire (ATRQ). Patients will be randomized in a 1:1:1 fashion to one of three open-label treatment arms: a) aripiprazole augmentation, b) rTMS augmentation, and c) switching to venlafaxine XR or Duloxetine.

    at UCLA

  • Diabetes and Depression Text Messaging Intervention

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    The main aim of the "Diabetes and Mental Health Adaptive Notification Tracking and Evaluation" trial (DIAMANTE) is to test a smartphone intervention that generates adaptive messaging, learning from daily patient data to personalize the timing and type of text-messages. We will compare the adaptive content to 1. a static messaging intervention with health management and educational messages and 2. a control condition that receives a weekly mood message. The primary outcomes for this aim will be improvements in physical activity at 6-month follow-up defined by daily step counts.

    at UCSF

  • Effectiveness and Implementation of eScreening in Post 9/11 Transition Programs

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Electronic screening is effective for timely detection of, and intervention for, suicidal ideation and other mental health symptoms. The VA eScreening program is a patient self-report electronic screening system that has shown promise for the efficient and effective collection of mental and physical health information among Veterans. However, additional effectiveness and implementation research is warranted to evaluate the impact of eScreening within VHA. This study will address questions of the impact of eScreening compared to screening as usual, while evaluating a multi-component implementation strategy (MCIS) for optimal enterprise rollout of eScreening in VA Transition Care Management clinics.

    at UCSD

  • Engaging Mothers & Babies; Reimagining Antenatal Care for Everyone (EMBRACE) Study

    open to eligible females

    This is a randomized comparative effectiveness study of two forms of enhanced prenatal care among 2,600 Medi-Cal eligible pregnant women in Fresno, California. The goal is to see whether group prenatal care with wrap around services versus individual prenatal care supplemented by services covered by the California Department of Public Health Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program (CPSP) results in lower rates of preterm birth, less depression and anxiety, and more respectful and greater satisfaction with prenatal care.

    at UCSF

  • Evaluation of a Crowd-Powered Web Platform for Depression and Anxiety

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    100 participants will be enrolled in a two-armed randomized controlled trial of the Accumulated Depression and Anxiety Plans and Treatments (ADAPT) platform which integrates internet Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (iCBT) to determine impact on symptoms of depression and anxiety. This trial will pilot the effectiveness of the ADAPT platform, and evaluate the extent to which the ADAPT platform engages putative targets of personal relevance, skills use, and skills mastery.

    at UC Irvine

  • Health and Health Care Utilization Effects of Medical Debt Forgiveness

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this study is to estimate the direct, causal impact of medical debt on health care utilization, mental health, and wellbeing of patients. The investigators will conduct a survey to measure the impact of the debt forgiveness on health care use, mental health, and wellbeing. The survey will be administered to approximately 17,000 subjects of a recent medical financial intervention. In that prior intervention, a non-profit charity, RIP Medical Debt, purchased and abolished medical debt for a randomly selected about 6,000 (out of the 17,000) individuals. In this current protocol, the investigators will administer the survey, and will compare surveyed outcomes of subjects who received and did not receive the intervention.

    at UCLA

  • Long Term Follow Up Study to COMP 001 And COMP 003 Trials (P-TRD LTFU)

    open to eligible people ages 18-55

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the long-term efficacy of psilocybin with respect to use of new antidepressant treatment, hospitalisations for depression, suicidality, and depressive severity rated using the Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) over a total of 52 weeks (compared across the 1 mg, 10 mg and 25 mg psilocybin groups from COMP 001).

    at UCSD

  • Media Project and Health Study - Spanish Version

    open to eligible females ages 21-50

    We seek to test the efficacy of the Spanish version of the "Catalina" web-app intervention compared to an attention control web-app in reducing symptoms of depression and/or anxiety and motivate women to take action to get help.

    at UCLA

  • Mindfulness-based Intervention to Address PTSD in Trauma-exposed, Homeless Women

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a major public health concern that disproportionately effects minorities and those with low-socioeconomic status, such as homeless women, creating a critical health disparity. PTSD has been linked with dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) functioning and increased inflammation, which can lead to long-term physical-health problems and PTSD-symptom maintenance, exacerbating disparities. Mindfulness-based interventions, including Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction (MBSR), have shown promise as a complementary tool for addressing PTSD in veterans and with low-income, minority populations, but homeless women have not been examined adequately. MBSR may improve PTSD symptomatology and help modulate the dysregulated stress response common in individuals with PTSD, improving physical and mental health concurrently. This project is an open-label, parallel, modified-cross over clinical trial of a modified-MBSR intervention to reduce PTSD symptoms in homeless women and to explore physiological correlates of treatment-response. Hypotheses: 1. Participation in an MBSR-based intervention will be associated with clinically significant reduction in PTSD (primary outcome), lower depression symptoms and greater drug and alcohol abstinence (secondary outcomes) compared to participation in an attention control. 2. Compared to an attention control, participants in an MBSR-based intervention group will demonstrate improvements in cortisol reactivity and lower inflammation. At baseline, women will complete psychosocial assessments (e.g., depression, substance use, trauma history) and participate in a brief stress task, providing salivary samples before and after the task (which will be assayed for cortisol and C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation). Women will then participate in 1) a 9-session MBSR-based program that was modified based on an initial qualitative component that involved a Community Advisory Board and focus groups with women from the community (N=4 focus groups; 28 women total) or 2) a nine-session health-promotion course (i.e., attention-control condition). Follow-up assessments that include psychosocial and biological data will occur immediately after final intervention session and again 6-months later. Clinically-meaningful improvements in PTSD (primary outcome) and secondary outcomes (e.g., depression, substance use, inflammation, cortisol reactivity) will be examined.

    at UC Irvine

  • Mobile Web-based Behavioral Intervention for Improving Caregiver Well-being

    open to eligible people ages 40 years and up

    Caregivers suffer great amounts of distress that significantly impacts their mental and physical well-being, yet caregivers' access to quality, evidence-based care is currently very limited. The public health significance of the proposed study is that our internet and mobile-based web intervention will (1) significantly reduce caregiver distress and improve caregivers' overall well-being, and (2) dramatically increase caregivers' access to high quality, evidence-based care at relatively low cost.

    at UCSD

  • Multimodal MRI Characteristics of Psychotherapy Response in Late Life Depression

    open to eligible people ages 65 years and up

    The specific focus of this study is to gather data regarding the effects of a psychological therapy known as Problem Solving Therapy (PST) on cerebral blood flow (CBF), cortical gray matter (GM) atrophy, subcortical white matter (WM) lesion burden, and measures of cognitive function in subjects with Late Life Major Depressive Disorder (LLD). This research goal will be achieved by recruiting 110 individuals over the age of 65 with LLD. The primary outcomes will be change in CBF, change in GM atrophy, change in WM lesion, change in cognitive function, and change in depression severity from baseline to the end of 12 weeks of PST.

    at UCSF

  • Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for Assessment of Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Develop a NIRSIT testing protocol that can be administered in the diagnostic setting and reliably distinguishes the symptoms and severity of depression, with the help of repeated measure (up to five visits per subject) comparison of patients being treated for Major Depressive Disorder with control, non-depressed subjects.

    at UCSF

  • Optimizing Outcomes of Treatment-Resistant Depression in Older Adults

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    The purpose of this research study is to assess which antidepressants work the best in older adults who have treatment-resistant depression (TRD).

    at UCLA

  • Pilot Study of Mirtazapine for the Dual Tx of Depression and CINV in High-Grade Glioma Pts on TMZ

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of the study is to estimate the ability of mirtazapine to reduce depression, nausea, and vomiting, and maintain weight in depressed glioma patients undergoing Temozolomide (TMZ) therapy. Of equal importance, the investigators will monitor the tolerability of Mirtazapine in these patients over the course of the study.

    at UC Irvine

  • rTMS in Alleviating Pain and Co-Morbid Symptoms in Gulf War Veterans Illness (GWVI)

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study aims to look at the effectiveness of using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in relieving pain and other co-morbid symptoms of Gulf War Illness.

    at UCSD

  • Rural Dementia Caregiver Project

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    These caregivers are a vulnerable group due to their physical isolation and well-documented rural disparities in health care access and quality. Many rural dementia caregivers experience serious health consequences due to caregiving responsibilities that can limit their ability to maintain their caregiving role. Thus, there is a pressing need for effective, scalable, and accessible programs to support rural dementia caregivers. Online programs offer a convenient and readily translatable option for program delivery because they can be accessed by caregivers in the home and at the convenience of the user. Building Better Caregivers is an online 6-week, interactive, small-group self-management, social support, and skills-building workshop developed for caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease or related dementia. The investigators will conduct a hybrid effectiveness-implementation randomized controlled trial that will enroll and randomize 640 rural dementia caregivers into two groups: 320 in the intervention (workshop) group and 320 in the attention control group. Caregivers will be recruited throughout the United States. Primary outcomes will be caregiver stress and depression symptoms. The investigators hypothesize that stress scores and depression symptoms will be significantly improved at 12 months in the intervention group versus control group. The investigators will also identify key strengths (facilitators) and weaknesses (barriers) of workshop implementation. The investigators will use the RE-AIM implementation framework and a mixed methods approach to identify implementation characteristics pertinent to both caregivers and rural community organizations. If the Building Better Caregivers workshop is proven to be effective, this research has the potential to open new research horizons, particularly on how to reach and effectively support isolated dementia caregivers in rural areas with an intervention that is scalable, even in low-resourced settings. If the workshop can achieve its goals with rural dementia caregivers, some of those most isolated, it would also be expected to be scalable in other low-resourced settings (e.g., in urban or suburban environments).

    at UCSF

  • Sleep and Healthy Aging Research for Depression (SHARE-D) Study

    open to eligible people ages 60-90

    Late-life depression is a significant public health concern, and effective interventions for prevention and treatment are needed. Insomnia and inflammation are modifiable targets for depression prevention, and this study is significant in using an experimental approach (i.e., inflammatory challenge) to probe acute inflammatory- and depression responses as a function of insomnia, which will inform identification of molecular targets for pharmacologic interventions, and improvement of insomnia treatments to prevent depression in older adults. Project

    at UCLA

  • Sleep and Healthy Aging Research on Depression for Younger Women

    open to eligible females ages 25-44

    Compelling evidence indicates inflammation plays a role in depression, but potential mechanisms linking inflammation to depression, such as dysregulated reward processing, are poorly understood. This study comprehensively evaluates effects of inflammation on reward across dimensions (e.g., anticipating versus receiving a reward) and types (e.g., money vs. smiling faces) in younger and older women. Characterizing how inflammation shapes the dynamic and multidimensional reward system, and how this may differ by age, may give insight into risk factors for depression and help identify critical points for intervention.

    at UCLA

  • Technology Enhanced Family Treatment

    open to eligible people ages 13-19

    The investigators propose to enhance the scalability of family-focused therapy (FFT), a 12-session evidence-based therapy for youth at high risk for mood disorders, through augmentation with a novel mobile phone application called MyCoachConnect (MCC). In adolescents with mood instability who have a parent with bipolar or major depressive disorder, clinicians in community clinics will conduct FFT sessions (consisting of psychoeducation and family skills training) supplemented by weekly MCC "real time" assessments of moods and family relationships; based on results of these assessments and the family's progress in treatment, clinicians will then push personalized informational and coaching alerts regarding the practice of communication and problem-solving skills. The investigators hypothesize that the augmented version of FFT (FFT-MCC) will be more effective than FFT without coaching/informational alerts in altering treatment targets and in stabilizing youths' mood symptoms and quality of life.

    at UCLA

  • Telepsychology in Spinal Cord Injury

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will determine the effectiveness of tele-psychology in treating persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) with depressed mood in the early period post-rehabilitation discharge. Depression among individuals with SCI is the most common psychological condition following an injury; 22% of civilians with SCI and 28% of veterans with SCI experience depression after injury, which is higher than the able-bodied population (Williams 2015; Ullrich 2014). Individuals with SCI face many barriers in receiving psychotherapy, such as lack of accessible transportation, unfamiliarity with community resources, or stigma associated with seeking treatment for depression, which this project aims to address. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), which helps people develop different ways of thinking and behaving to reduce their psychological distress, will be provided via iPad FaceTime by a psychologist with expertise in working with persons with SCI. The objectives of the proposed project are to reduce depressive symptoms, decrease associated symptoms of anxiety, and to improve satisfaction with life with CBT provided via tele-psychology. The secondary objective is to show intermediate efficacy of tele-psychology in persons with SCI with depressed mood.

    at UCSF

  • The Effect of Problem Solving Therapy and Antidepressant Therapy on Cerebral Perfusion and Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) in Depressed Elders

    open to eligible people ages 65 years and up

    The focus of this study is to gather preliminary data regarding the effects of a psychological therapy-Problem Solving Therapy-and an antidepressant medication-sertraline-on 1) cerebral perfusion (CP), 2) brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and 3) measures of cognitive function in subjects with late life major depression (LLMD). This research goal will be achieved by recruiting 38 individuals over the age of 65 with LLMD. The primary outcomes will be change in CP, change in BDNF, and change in cognitive measures from baseline to the end of 12 weeks of either therapy. We will also examine predictors of treatment outcome including severity of executive dysfunction, baseline BDNF concentrations, and baseline CP measures. The baseline neuropsychological testing, brain imaging, and depression assessment will be obtained in a companion study (PI S. Mackin; CHR #H42689-32681-01) that is IRB approved and is already in progress. In the current study a baseline serum BDNF level will be added to Dr. Mackin's protocol. Patients will then receive either 12 weeks of Problem Solving Therapy or antidepressant treatment with sertraline. Both treatments are evidence based and commonly administered in our clinic. Outcome variables will be measures of depression severity, the BDNF serum concentration, cerebral perfusion using a MRI arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique and cognitive changes in memory and executive dysfunction. This is a preliminary or pilot study. The primary objectives are to determine if the methods appear feasible and to determine if change in BDNF or CP occur after treatment and secondarily to determine if there are changes in cognitive functioning. The study is not powered to show differences between treatments. The hypotheses are 1) PST will result in increased perfusion in frontal regions of the brain but that frontal perfusion will not change with sertraline; 2)sertraline will result in an increase in BDNF but PST will not. Change in cognitive measures of memory, learning, and executive dysfunction will be examined on an exploratory basis.

    at UCSF

  • Tractography Guided Subcallosal Cingulate Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression

    open to eligible people ages 21-70

    Treatment resistant depression remains a major problem for individuals and society. Surgical procedures may provide relief for some of these patients. The most frequently considered surgical approach is deep brain stimulation (DBS) of a part of the brain called the subcallosal cingulate region. However, the effectiveness and safety is not well established. The investigators will use a novel approach using advanced imaging technique (magnetic resonance tractography) to evaluate the feasibility and safety of this surgical approach. An innovative method for the definition of DBS target will be applied that redefines the concept of targeting as one of targeting a symptomatic network rather than a structural brain region using subject-based brain anatomy to define the target location. The correlation between imaging findings at baseline with the mood score changes at different time points of the study will be investigated.

    at UCLA

  • Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) Therapy in Major Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a low-intensity neuromodulation technique of minimal risk that has been used as an experimental procedure for reducing depressive symptoms and symptoms of other brain disorders. Though tDCS applied to prefrontal brain areas is shown to reduce symptoms in some people with major depressive disorder (MDD), the extent of antidepressant response often differs. Methods that map current flow directly in the brain while a person is receiving tDCS and that determine how functional neuroimaging signal changes after a series of tDCS sessions may help us understand how tDCS works, how it can be optimized, and if it can be used as an effective antidepressant. Investigators will address these questions in a two-part randomized double blind exploratory clinical trial. For this part of the study, investigators will determine relationships between target engagement and clinical outcomes (mood) and functional sub-constructs of cognitive control and emotion negativity bias, and whether imaging markers at baseline predict changes in antidepressant response. One hundred people with depression (50 in each group) will be randomized to receive either HD-tDCS or sham-tDCS for a total of 12 sessions each lasting 20 minutes occurring on consecutive weekdays. At the first and last session, subjects will receive 20-30 minutes of active or sham HD-tDCS in the MRI scanner, which will allow investigators to map tDCS currents, and track changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) pre-to- post treatment using completely non-invasive methods. At the first and last session and mid-way through the trial, participants will also complete a series of clinical ratings and neurocognitive tests.

    at UCLA

  • Treatment for Affect Dimensions

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Affect, or the tendency to experience a given emotion, often is subdivided into two domains. Positive affect is the tendency to experience positive emotions, such as happiness, excitement, elation, and enthusiasm. Negative affect is the tendency to experience negative emotions, such as anger, resentment, sadness, anxiety, and fear. Humans exhibit a range of emotions that span across positive and negative affect domains with some individuals experiencing more of one type of affect than another. Recent research and developing theories have suggested that mental health disorders can be conceptualized as the tendency for an individual to fall into one or more extremes on these categories. Therefore, treatments should not be based on targeting a conglomeration of symptoms (as we have been doing for the past century) but rather they should be treating the underlying dysregulation (e.g., high or low positive and negative affect). In an effort to address this gap, the current study plans to recruit participants for a treatment trial consisting of two psychotherapies: (a) positive affect treatment (PAT), and (b) negative affect treatment (NAT). The overarching goal of this project are to evaluate the target (i.e. potential mechanisms) of PAT. Participants will be randomized to either a 15-week positive (PAT) or negative affect treatment (NAT). Participants will also complete four laboratory visits (before treatment, during treatment (two times), and at post-treatment) to measure potential targets or mediators of PAT. These laboratory-based assessments will included measures of the positive affect system such as behavioral, subjective, and psychophysiological responses to reward, anticipation and motivation, reward attainment, and reward learning.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of Esketamine Nasal Spray, Administered as Monotherapy, in Adult Participants With Treatment-resistant Depression

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of each individual dose of esketamine nasal spray, 56 milligram (mg) and 84 mg, compared with placebo nasal spray in improving depressive symptoms in participants with treatment resistant depression (TRD), as assessed by the change from baseline in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score from Day 1 (prerandomization) to the end of the 4 week double-blind treatment phase (Day 28).

    at UCSD UCSF

  • A Study of Seltorexant Compared to Quetiapine XR as Adjunctive Therapy to Antidepressants in Adult and Elderly Participants With Major Depressive Disorder With Insomnia Symptoms Who Have Responded Inadequately to Antidepressant Therapy

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of seltorexant compared with quetiapine extended-release (XR) as adjunctive therapy to an antidepressant drug in treatment response in participants with major depressive disorder with insomnia symptoms (MDDIS) who have had an inadequate response to current antidepressant therapy with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI).

    at UCSD

  • A Study of the Change in Disease State and Safety of Oral Cariprazine Capsules in the Treatment of Depression in Pediatric Participants (10 to 17 Years of Age) With Bipolar I Disorder

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Bipolar disorder is a severe chronic mood disorder that affects up to 4% of the adult population and 1.8% of the pediatric population in the United States. The treatment of the depressive episodes of bipolar disorder in the pediatric population has not been as widely studied as the treatment of depressive episodes in bipolar disorder in adults, therefore pharmacotherapeutic options are limited. Given the change in disease state and safety demonstrated in adults with depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the change in disease state and safety of cariprazine in the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in the pediatric population. Cariprazine is an approved drug for the treatment of depressive episodes in adult participants with bipolar I disorder. Study doctors put participants in 1 of 2 groups, called treatment arms. There is a 1 in 2 chance that a participant will be assigned to placebo. Around 380 Participants ages 10-17 years with bipolar I disorder will be enrolled in approximately 60 sites worldwide. Participants receiving the study drug will receive Dose A or B of Cariprazine based on age and weight. At Week 3, participants with insufficient response will have their dose increased to Dose B or Dose C, while participants with sufficient response will continue receiving the Dose A or B for the remainder of the treatment period. The treatment period will be followed by a safety follow-up (SFU) period for 4 weeks. There may be higher treatment burden for participants in this trial compared to their standard of care. Participants will attend regular weekly visits during the study at a hospital or clinic. The effect of the treatment will be checked by medical assessments, blood tests, checking for side effects and completing questionnaires.

    at UCSD

  • Adapting and Examining Collaborative Decision Skills Training Among Veterans With Serious Mental Illness

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Recovery-oriented care is an imperative for the VA, particularly in mental health programming for Veterans with serious mental illness (SMI). Collaborative decision-making (CDM) is a recovery-oriented approach to treatment decision-making that assigns equal participation and obligation to patients and providers across all aspects of decision-making, thereby empowering patients and facilitating better decision-making based on patient values and preferences. CDM is associated with several important outcomes including improved treatment engagement, treatment satisfaction, and social functioning. However, current levels of CDM among Veterans with SMI are low, and there is not yet an evidence-based method to improve CDM. Improving Veteran skill sets associated with engaging in CDM is a potential intervention strategy. Collaborative Decision Skills Training (CDST) is a promising new intervention that was previously developed by the applicant for use in adult civilians with SMI and found to improve relevant skills and improve sense of personal recovery. The proposed study has two primary stages. First, a small, one-armed, open label trial will establish CDST's feasibility will evaluate CDST among 12 Veterans with SMI receiving services at the VA San Diego Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center (PRRC) and identify and complete any needed adaptations to CDST. Stakeholder feedback from Veterans, VA clinicians, and VA administrators will be collected to assess Veteran needs and service context to identify any needed adaptations to the CDST manual or the delivery of CDST to maximize its impact and feasibility. The developers of CDST will review all feedback and make final decisions about adaptations to ensure that CDST retains its essential components to protect against loss of efficacy. For example, a recommendation to adjust role-play topics to better reflect the needs of Veterans would be accepted because it would increase CDST's relevance without impairing its integrity, but a recommendation to remove all role-plays would not be accepted because it would cause loss of a key component. Second, CDST will be compared to active control (AC) using a randomized clinical trial of 72 Veterans. The primary outcome measure will be functioning within the rehabilitation context, operationalized as frequency of Veteran CDM behaviors during Veteran-provider interactions. Secondary outcomes are treatment attendance, engagement, satisfaction, and motivation, along with treatment outcomes (i.e., rehabilitation goal attainment, sense of personal recovery, symptom severity, and social functioning). Three exploratory outcomes will be assessed: Veteran-initiated collaborative behaviors, acute service use and provider attitudes and behavior. Veterans will be randomly assigned to CDST or AC conditions. Veterans in the both groups will attend eight hour-long group sessions held over eight weeks. All Veterans will complete an assessment battery at baseline, post-intervention, and at three-month post-intervention follow-up. Following the trial and adaptation phase, the findings will be used to develop a CDST service delivery manual and design a logical subsequent study. The results of the proposed study will inform the potential for larger trials of CDST and the utility of providing CDST broadly to Veterans with SMI. The results of this study will expand current understanding of CDM among Veterans with SMI by providing data that will: 1) identify adaptations needed to optimize CDST for Veterans receiving services in PRRCs; 2) identify possible benefits of CDST; 3) inform development of alternate interventions or methods to improve CDM; and 4) further elucidate CDM and associated treatment processes among Veterans with SMI receiving VA rehabilitation services.

    at UCSD

  • Characterizing Cognitive Decline in Late Life Depression: The ADNI Depression Project

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    The purpose of this research study is to characterize the mechanisms contributing to cognitive impairment and accelerated cognitive decline in Late Life Depression (LLD). This is a non-randomized, observational, non-treatment study. One hundred and twenty (120) subjects who meet criteria for Major Depression or LLD will be enrolled for a period of 30 months. Data from an additional 300 non-depressed subjects will be used from ADNI studies for comparison. Depression history, symptom severity and health information will be collected at the initial psychiatric visit to determine eligibility. A 3 Tesla (3T) Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan and florbetapir (18F-AV-45) amyloid imaging will be conducted at the ADNI clinic site visits. Collection of plasma and serum for biomarkers, clinical assessments and cognitive assessments will be conducted at two time points. Blood samples will also be collected for genetic analysis.

    at UCSF

  • Compassion Meditation vs. Health Education for Veterans

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    Chronic pain (CP) is a major health problem for military Veterans, and CP is often associated with comorbid mental health problems, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. CP with psychological comorbidity is associated with increased healthcare costs, medication use, risk of suicide and rates of disability and reduced quality of life. Current empirically supported treatments do not always lead to substantial improvements (up to 50% of patients drop out or are do not respond to treatment). This project was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel intervention for addressing these challenges. Compassion meditation (CM), a meditative practice that focuses on the wish to remove suffering, is a contemplative practice that has promise for the amelioration of physical and mental health problems as well as promoting positive affect and improving quality of life. This study will evaluate the efficacy of Cognitively-Based Compassion Training for Chronic Pain with Psychological Comorbidity (CBCT-CP+) compared to Health Education while Living with Pain (H.E.L.P.) control condition, in a sample of among Veterans with CP conditions and psychological comorbidity.

    at UCSD

  • Computerized Substance Use and Depression Screening and Behavioral Treatment in HIV Primary Care

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    Substance use disorders (SUDs), depression and anxiety in HIV-infected patients result in poor HIV outcomes, yet are often unrecognized and untreated. To address these problems, this study examines the implementation and effectiveness of a clinical intervention consisting of self-administered tablet-based SUD and depression screening at routine HIV primary care clinic visits, followed by evidence-based treatments for SUD, anxiety and depression delivered by a behavioral health specialist. If successful, this study has potential to reduce SUD-, anxiety- and depression-related problems and reduce HIV treatment disparities for patients with these comorbidities.

    at UCSF

  • Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) for Depression Using Directional Current Steering and Individualized Network Targeting

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    The goal of the study is to address the unmet need of TRD patients by identifying brain networks critical for treating depression and to use next generation precision DBS with steering capability to engage these targeted networks. The study's goal will be achieved through 3 specific aims: 1. Demonstrate device capability to selectively and predictably engage distinct brain networks 2. Delineate depression-relevant networks and demonstrate behavioral changes with network-targeted stimulation 3. Demonstrate that chronic DBS using steered, individualized targeting is feasible and safe for reducing depressive symptoms

    at UCLA

  • Development and Pilot Test of a Postnatal mHealth Intervention - Phase 2

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    The goal of the study is to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the optimized MeSSSSage intervention which was developed and revised based on the results of our initial pilot testing. The investigators will conduct a controlled 4-arm factorial design randomized study to test the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary effectiveness of several intervention modalities over a 6-month period.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Effects of Intravenous (IV) Citalopram Hydrochloride During Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

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    This study will recruit 30 subjects diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Subjects will be recieve one infusion treatment of citalopram or placebo and 10 treatments of a form of transcranial magnetic stimulation, theta burst stimulation (TBS). Subjects will also undergo brain scans, quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) brain activity recordings, and mood surveys. Study activities will be performed over the course of 4 weeks.

    at UCLA

  • Enhancing Transdiagnostic Mechanisms of Cognitive Dyscontrol

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    The proposed project aims to test the cognitive and neural effects of a cognitive training in a sample of individuals seeking treatment for anxiety, depression, or traumatic stress symptoms. Participants will be randomly assigned to a high dose, low dose, or assessment only condition. Participants will be compared on cognitive performance and brain response during cognitive tasks from baseline to post-treatment.

    at UCSD

  • Examine the Effects of Meditation on Daily Psychological Stress Responses in Woman With a History of Child Adversity

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    The aim of the Everyday Moments of Mindfulness (EMMI) study is to test whether brief mindfulness-based practices will improve daily psychological stress responses in women (age 30-60) who report a history of early life adversity. Following a baseline visit (remotely or in person), participants complete daily surveys and audio-guided mindfulness-based practices in everyday life via the study app. Specifically, participants receive app-notifications three times/day (morning, afternoon, evening) to complete daily surveys of current stressors and psychological states. At each notification, each participant is then randomly assigned to either receive a mindfulness-based intervention or not (max of 3 interventions/day). Thus, participants are randomized many times over the course of this 30-day study. At the end of the study, participants complete a follow-up visit (remotely or in person).

    at UCSF

  • FACE-PC: Family-Centered Care for Older Adults With Depression and Chronic Medical Conditions in Primary Care

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    Comorbid depression and multiple medical conditions in older adults are a serious public health problem. As an important facilitator of health-related activities, families are already involved in various aspects of self-management of chronic disease in older adults. Despite the benefits they provide, informal caregiving activities currently are organized outside the medical system, which potentially creates redundant or misaligned efforts.The purpose of the mentored research is to examine the feasibility and acceptability of the FACE-PC, a theory-driven, multi- component, technology-assisted interdisciplinary team-based care model that systematically involves family in chronic disease management. It aims to optimize the patient and family's collective ability to self-manage chronic disease.

    at UCSF

  • Feasibility & Acceptability of a Virtual Sister Circle Intervention for Black Women With Depressive Symptoms

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    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a protocol for middle- and older-aged Black women with depressive symptoms.

    at UCLA

  • Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation for MDD

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    This study will evaluate the effectiveness of intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation for patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    at UCLA

  • Ketamine for Older Adults Pilot

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    This pilot study will assess the safety and feasibility of intravenous (IV) ketamine in older adults with Treatment-Resistant Depression (TRD). In addition, this study will develop and utilize innovative methodological approaches to demonstrate the feasibility of precision medicine and mobile health approaches in depression treatment.

    at UCLA

  • Latent Structure of Multi-level Assessments and Predictors of Outcomes for Women in Recovery

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    In this study the investigators will seek to improve their understanding of how positive and negative valence systems, cognition, and arousal/interoception are inter-related in disorders of trauma, mood, substance use, and eating behavior for women involved in a court diversion program in Tulsa, Oklahoma (Women in Recovery). The investigators will recruit 100 individuals and use a wide range of assessment tools, neuroimaging measures, blood and microbiome collections and behavioral tasks to complete the baseline and follow-up study visits. Upon completion, the investigators aim to have robust and reliable dimensional measures that quantify these systems and a set of assessments that should be recommended as a clinical tool to enhance outcome prediction for the clinician and assist in determining who will likely benefit from the diversion program, and to inform future revision or augmentation of the program to increase treatment effectiveness.

    at UCSD

  • Leucine for Depression Study (L-DEP)

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Depression is very common and poses a huge disease burden. About 20% of the US population suffers from depression at lease once in their lifetime. Inflammations that are hidden inside our body as a result of aging, obesity, chronic diseases, or certain treatments (e.g., interferon for hepatitis C) appear to cause depressive symptoms and even clinical depression. Individuals with such inflammations are more likely to suffer from depression and are less likely to respond to currently available antidepressant medications. This study will test leucine, an amino acid, as a new way to mitigate depressive symptoms in response to such inflammations. This study begins with a 90-minute screening session to determine whether participants are eligible to join the main study. Those who meet the eligibility criteria will then join the main study, which will consist of taking leucine or maltodextrin (i.e., oral placebo) for 2 weeks at home and an 8-hour session at the UCLA Medical Center. A brief telephone follow-up every 3 months for 2 years with questions on mood is also planned. Approximately 90 healthy adults will be recruited for participation in the study. During the course of the study, participants will take leucine or maltodextrin for 2 weeks at home and then will be injected either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline (i.e., intravenous placebo) at the UCLA Medical Center. LPS is a bacterial substance that can initiate chemical reactions that are similar to those seen in individuals with mild sickness symptoms, such as a slight increase in body temperature, muscle aches, or tiredness. It is a safe way of investigating the body's response to inflammation and how these changes may alter cognitive, emotional, or neural function. It has been given thousands of times to healthy volunteers - both younger and older adults - without any serious side effects.

    at UCLA

  • MBCT for People With Parkinson's Disease and Caregivers

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    This study aims to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in reducing anxiety and/or depressive symptoms in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and caregivers of people with PD.

    at UCSF

  • Meditation Accelerated Brain Stimulation for Depression

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    Repetitive Transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an FDA-approved treatment for depression that involves brief magnetic stimulation pulses on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) brain region. The ultimate goal of this treatment is to increase excitability and long-term plasticity in DLPFC, a brain region shown to be hypo-active in depression. Unfortunately, rTMS only has low to moderate efficacy; remission rates for patients range from ~15-30% in large randomized controlled trials. The focus of this research is to develop a next-generation rTMS protocol that is guided by the basic principles underlying brain plasticity, in order to improve the efficacy of rTMS for the treatment of depression. Specifically, in this study the investigators will test rTMS paired with a depression-relevant cognitive state of internal attention.

    at UCSD

  • Mobile Virtual Positive Experiences for Anhedonia

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Anhedonia is a symptom dimension that characterizes many individuals suffering from depression, as well as some types of anxiety, psychosis, and substance use. For the most part, treatments are effective in decreasing negative affect but ineffective in improving anhedonia, with some antidepressant medications even worsening symptoms of anhedonia. Yet anhedonia is a significant marker of poor prognosis as well as suicidal ideation and actual suicide. The development of effective treatments for anhedonia is thus of paramount importance. Advances in neuroscience indicate specific targets that may underlie anhedonia that can be shifted through behavioral training. The investigators have developed such a program and found it to be effective in raising positive affect, especially for depressed or anxious individuals with anhedonia at baseline. To date, this program has been implemented by highly trained clinicians, which have supervised its implementation on a large scale. Moreover, the behavior program is dependent on readily available rewarding experiences, which anhedonia obviously challenges. Furthermore, mechanistic evaluation is impeded by intra¬- and inter-¬individual variability in exposure to rewarding stimuli. Virtual Reality (VR) offsets these barriers by repeated controlled immersion in experiences designed to enhance approach motivation, initial responsiveness to reward attainment, and reward learning. In this current study, the investigators aim to measure clinical outcomes using Virtual Reality-Reward Training (VR-RT).

    at UCLA

  • Pain and Major Depressive Disorder

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    This study will examine the effects of brain stimulation on pain symptoms associated with Major depressive disorder. This study will enroll 69 Subjects. Study subjects will be asked to complete surveys about their mood and well-being, 2 blood draws, 2 MRIs, 3 electroencephalograms, and receive 30 treatments of blinded transcranial magnetic stimulation. There is no control group as all subjects will receive some form of active treatment. Subjects are required to participate in 30-33 study visits and volunteer 40 hours of their time. Compensation for this study is $150 for completing all study activities.

    at UCLA

  • PRIME Care (PRecision Medicine In MEntal Health Care)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The focus of this application is on the impact of providing depressed Veterans and their providers with the results of pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing for psychotropic medications. The project focuses on whether and how patients and providers use genetic test results given to them at the time an antidepressant is to be initiated to treat Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and whether use of the test results improves patient outcomes. MDD is one of the most common conditions associated with military service and combat exposure, increases suicide risk, and worsens the course of common medical conditions, making it a leading cause of functional impairment and mortality. Validation of a PGx test to personalize the treatment of MDD represents an important opportunity to improve the healthcare of Veterans.

    at UCSF

  • Psilocybin Therapy for Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease

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    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety, tolerability, and feasibility of psilocybin therapy for depression and anxiety in people with Parkinson's disease.

    at UCSF

  • Psychostimulant Augmentation of Repetitive TMS for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

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    This study analyzes the affects or Adderall extended-release (XR) in Subjects receiving brain stimulation therapy for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder. Subjects will be assigned by chance to active or placebo group. Active group will be asked to take one 15 mg pill once daily of Adderall XR (amphetamine) and the Placebo group will be asked take an identical appearing tablet/capsule, one tablet by mouth daily. The placebo tablet has no active ingredients and has no affect on the body or mind. With the exception of the study drug, all other study activities between both groups will be identical. Subjects will use the assigned study drug two weeks before therapy and throughout the first 10 therapy treatments. A total of seven(7) visits will be required for screening, drug assignment, and completion of mood assessments. This study will enroll a total of 30 Subjects.

    at UCLA

  • Spectral Correlation Coefficient-based TMS

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This study will analyze the feasibility, safety, and tolerability of administering repetitive Transcranial magnetic stimulation(TMS) at frequencies other than standard 10 Hz. This study will enroll 10 subjects who will undergo one quantitative electroencephalograph, one TMS procedure to determine the appropriate frequency and intensity for treatment, weekly mood/symptom assessments, and up to 30 TMS treatments. Subjects will be asked to participate for up to 6 weeks.

    at UCLA

  • Spectral Correlation Coefficient-determine TMS for Depression

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will investigate the feasibility, safety, and tolerability of administering repetitive Transcranial magnetic stimulation(TMS) at frequencies other than standard 10 Hz. This study will enroll 10 subjects who will undergo one quantitative electroencephalograph, one TMS procedure to determine the appropriate frequency and intensity for treatment, weekly mood/symptom assessments, and up to 30 TMS treatments. Subjects will be asked to participate for up to 6 weeks.

    at UCLA

  • Testing Mediators and Moderators of a Fotonovela for Depression to Promote Help-seeking Behavior

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Although rates of depression are similar in Latinx populations compared to non-Latinx whites (NLW), there are significant disparities in service utilization. Mental health literacy - one's knowledge and attitudes about mental health and treatment-seeking - is a significant predictor of help-seeking behavior and likely contributes to mental health disparities among Latinx. Understanding ways to improve mental health literacy in Latinx populations is important to reducing these disparities. Health literacy interventions that are engaging, dramatic, and culturally-relevant, such as fotonovelas (graphic novels designed to change health-related knowledge and attitudes), show promise in changing mental health literacy in Latinx populations. However, little is known about how these interventions work and for whom they are most effective. Furthermore, although there is some evidence that fotonovelas can change mental health attitudes and intent to seek treatment, their impact on help-seeking behavior is less understood. The purpose of this study is to examine 1) if narrative and cultural elements of a fotonovela for Latinx with depression (i.e., transportation, identification, and social proliferation) are important mediators in changing mental health attitudes and help-seeking behaviors and 2) if factors such as rurality, acculturation, depression severity and logistic barriers to treatment moderate these relationships.

    at UCLA

  • Theophylline for Depression Study

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Depression is very common and poses a huge disease burden. About 20% of the US population suffers from depression at least once in their lifetime. Inflammations that are hidden inside our body as a result of aging, obesity, chronic diseases, or certain treatments (e.g., interferon for hepatitis C) appear to cause depressive symptoms and even clinical depression. Individuals with such inflammations are more likely to suffer from depression and are less likely to respond to currently available antidepressant medications. This study will test theophylline, a medication currently used for asthma treatment, as a new way to mitigate depressive symptoms in response to such inflammations. This study begins with a 90-minute screening session to determine whether participants are eligible to join the main study. Those who meet the eligibility criteria will then join the main study, which will consist of taking theophylline or methylcellulose (i.e., oral placebo) for 2 weeks at home and an 8-hour session at the UCLA Medical Center. Approximately 20 healthy adults will be recruited for participation in the study. During the course of the study, participants will take theophylline or methylcellulose for 2 weeks at home and then will be injected either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline (i.e., intravenous placebo) at the UCLA Medical Center. LPS is a bacterial substance that can initiate chemical reactions that are similar to those seen in individuals with mild sickness symptoms, such as a slight increase in body temperature, muscle aches, or tiredness. It is a safe way of investigating the body's response to inflammation and how these changes may alter cognitive, emotional, or neural function. It has been given thousands of times to healthy volunteers - both younger and older adults - without any serious side effects.

    at UCLA

  • Women's Health Initiative Strong and Healthy Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The WHISH trial applies state-of-the science behavioral principles and currently available technologies to deliver a physical activity intervention without face-to-face contact to ~25,000 older U.S. women expected to consent. It includes the National Institute of Aging (NIA) Go4Life® Exercise & Physical Activity materials 3 and WHISH developed targeted materials based on Go4Life® to provide inspirational tips and recommendations about how to achieve nationally recommended levels of PA and overcome barriers to exercise, with a means for self-monitoring and setting personal goals. The intervention builds upon evidence-based behavioral science principles and intervention components that have proven to be effective in increasing PA in older women, with innovative adaptive approaches to tailoring the delivery to meet individual (personal) needs.

    at UCSD

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